Dendroboard banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
434 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm currently in the process of building a new vivarium and one knowledge gap in particular struck me to me and cannot be resolved by looking at images others' builds. With Matala mats, no water is absorbed by the mat itself and passes through easily. But what about the finer filter foam that is placed on top of the Matala mat? From the images and the words used it look like aquarium foam which, from my understanding, will first absorb water until it's full before letting it pass through. Is this actually the case with the product that's we're supposed to use? Or am I misunderstanding and they're some different product entirely, one that is like the Matala mat and let water flow through immediately? Thank you.
 

· Registered
2 Dendrobates Leucomelas
Joined
·
19 Posts
I use a finer filter pad on top of matala for some builds. It isn't necessary really, but does allow water to pass through pretty easily. I use it to create more height typically, but matala is perfectly fine on its own.
What filter grade of Matala is commonly used for your drainage layers? Are there variations of Matala filter grades you recommend that would be different when putting on the next layer?

I would think if you are putting some other type of material on top of the Matala, i.e. leaf litter, sponge filters ABG, or gravels you would have a clogged up mess after awhile. What has been a successful substrate build for you?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,457 Posts
I think matala comes with different gap sizes, but in regards to working as a drainage layer, it doesn't really make any difference. Maybe a bit of extra water if it is larger gap sizes - but honestly, I wouldn't worry too much.

I typically use turface/Seachem Flourite over top of my matala and I usually put small pebbles in the front so I can drain easier, as I never drill my tanks for drainage. On top of that, ABG and leaf litter, or just leaf litter, depending on the setup.
 

· Registered
2 Dendrobates Leucomelas
Joined
·
19 Posts
I think matala comes with different gap sizes, but in regards to working as a drainage layer, it doesn't really make any difference. Maybe a bit of extra water if it is larger gap sizes - but honestly, I wouldn't worry too much.

I typically use turface/Seachem Flourite over top of my matala and I usually put small pebbles in the front so I can drain easier, as I never drill my tanks for drainage. On top of that, ABG and leaf litter, or just leaf litter, depending on the setup.
Thanks. I'll go with that.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
I am in the process of building a viv using blue Matala as drainage layer for the first time. I cut the Matala so as to create a topography with varying elevations. I've got Matala as the base, a layer of screen, egg crate, a layer of DekProTek (similar to a very loose Matala), followed by a screen and more egg crate. I like the egg crate in that it holds substate well and spreads the weight of the hardscape...

Thought it may give you some ideas...
 

Attachments

· Registered
2 Dendrobates Leucomelas
Joined
·
19 Posts
I am in the process of building a viv using blue Matala as drainage layer for the first time. I cut the Matala so as to create a topography with varying elevations. I've got Matala as the base, a layer of screen, egg crate, a layer of DekProTek (similar to a very loose Matala), followed by a screen and more egg crate. I like the egg crate in that it holds substate well and spreads the weight of the hardscape...

Thought it may give you some ideas...
I like the idea of egg crate in weight distribution on your layer builds. I might be over-thinking this, but my only concern is to keep the egg crate out of the standing water level. It seems that the structure of the egg crate would prohibit to some degree horizontal water flow, creating stagnant pockets in each cell of the egg crate. Again, this might just be me being anal.😆
 

· Administrator
Joined
·
7,352 Posts
A reason to keep water lower than the egg crate is to prevent it from wicking (from slight deviations in the levelness of the egg crate, and from the fluctuations in water level over time -- no reason to run the water level so close to the substrate). The entire contents of the drainage layer are "stagnant" and bad things don't really happen.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top