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It is a symptomatic response to the infection which causes tne inflamation on the skin,more than likely due to handleing.can be treated by mixing antibiotic in water in a hand mister and spraying frog 2 times daily,there are even herbal fixes which involve soaking frog in a chamomile water mix I will research that method and give you a cheaper alternative 2 the vet visit
 

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Really????? nice to know that you can psychically diagnose the issue as well as the cause....


Ed
 

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I have seen this several times on my retf over the course of the hundreds I have breed,and my girl friend is a vet and is pretty convinced its the same thing we have seen in our personal exp
 

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There are a number of potential issues that can create an infection like that seen in the picture. Some of the real causes are things like infections originating around encysted parasites, or even viral or fungal lesions that are secondarily infected. Ideally a biopsy would look to see if this was secondary to another issue, or possibly even an abcess that is larger in the underlying tissues or penetrating into the body cavity and is simply going to drain via that site.. Depending on deep it has penetrated into the underlying tissues (which can't be told from the the photos) a systemic antibiotic is probably going to be much more effective than a topically applied antibiotic. This is a matter that really should be discussed with a vet who can look at the frog in hand. The reason the vet has to determine if it involves deeper tissues or an encysted parasite, is because if the underlying factors aren't addressed the frog may continue to have symptoms which can lead to a systemic infection.

Ed
 

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I would agree with ed about seeing a vet asap,ed wouldnt there be a visible sign on the frog if it where from an abrasion other then the bump u see in the pic?i have seen similar bumps due to abrasions but they usually are a pink or red coloring.and I have seen bumps that where caused from poor husbandy neither of which look like this.i also know that he said he has not handled them in any way and all exams said they had a clean bill of health.in my similar exp it was a symptomatic response to the primary infection which I previously stated,that being said it was only an opinion and attemp to help.good luck
 

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In the 18 plus years I worked taking care of a large and diverse amphibian collection with vets on the staff, we saw a number of "similar" lesions (for lack of a better word) across multiple taxa during that time frame. They ranged from injuries, to encysted parasites (if they are encysted they don't show up on a fecal and the resulting infection can take a significant period of time to occur), to secondary infections from viral or fungal agents to abscessess that were deeper tissue and looking for a way to drain to the outside of the frog. Often the biopsy showed multiple pathogens infecting a site (potentially including fungal hyphae and/or protozoans (in the case of aquatic animals) or on occasion a piece of sharp material that was embedded in the tissue.

While I have not tried the cold chamomile tea, it was discussed a couple of times as a potential option until the cultures and the sensitivities came back from the vet techs.

Ed
 
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