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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The standard way of resiliconing a tank isnt too difficult. However I ran into some issues with a tank that was injection molded. The silicon looked old and crusty, so I started to remove it. It is hard to explain, but long story short it is extremley difficult to remove, and even if I do the structure would be ruined. would pond liner be a solution? The obvious would be to silicon it, but from what I know new silicon doesn’t stick to old silicon at all. pond Liner came into my mind since it seems like it would be easy yet effective. I can post some pictures later since it is hard to describe. Any feedback would help, thanks.
 

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Is this regarding the 65g fish tank you're working on?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, I’m a little sad since it’s backing up the whole process. In reality the current silicon COULD be watertight but it’s not worth it to have the tank for a year and then have water all over the floor. I wanna do it the right way, also I forgot to say that I used acetone and cleaning vinegar but they didn’t do much.
 

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I'm confused about what is injection molded -- that tank isn't.
 

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So, the right way to reseal a fish tank is to:

-- pull the top trim and bottom trim off,
-- separate all the glass by cutting through the silicone,
-- scrape off all the old silicone,
-- reassemble the tank with fresh silicone,
-- reattach the top and bottom trim.

The other way to do it is to leave the tank assembled and just scrape out the inner silicone bead from all joints (leaving the glass panes attached to each other, and not damaging the seal between each pane), and then reapplying a fresh bead on all inside joints. Sometimes works, sometimes doesn't, as you imply.

Personally, my favorite way to reseal a fish tank is to take the old tank, smash it with a hammer, clean up and discard the mess, and buy a new tank. I've resealed a few, and they look pretty bad, and takes a lot of effort, and the cost of a new tank (65g are around $150) is worth being able to sleep at night, to me anyway.

But anyway, those are the three options, I think.
 

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Personally, my favorite way to reseal a fish tank is to take the old tank, smash it with a hammer, clean up and discard the mess, and buy a new tank.
Ah, new construction. So much easier than working around old shit (remodeling). And often no more costly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well, $150 for a new tank IMO would be a great deal. The cheapest ones in pet stores near me like petco are all going for $300+. I purposely got the $20 caulk gun knowing it would be better than the $5 one, it works well. I also found that my finger is my best tool for smoothing out the silicon 😂 the caulk buddy is good, not great - I will give it another try tomorrow.
 

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If you are using the second method SM suggests (just resealing the inside), then try to just use a razor blade as much as possible and no chemicals that can damage the seal between the panes.

If you can get the trim off, I used to always completely reseal the tanks. ie. remove all the panes from each other and clean all the edges up, clean with alcohol and reset and reseal again. Without doing that, there is always a chance of leaking - albeit less because a vivarium won't have the same internal pressure on the seams.
 
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