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Discussion Starter #1
Ranitomeya summersi
AKA: Ranitomeya fantastica, Dendrobates fantastica, Banded fants.


  • Difficulty:
    Intermediate to Advanced

  • Location & History:
    This species occurs in the central Huallaga Canyon near the towns of Sauce and Chazuta in San Martin, Peru. This species appears to be primarily associated with premontane habitats, occurring up to 684 m elevation. Habitats tend to be relatively dry, with reduced rainfall between the months of June through September. (1)

  • Descriptions & Behavior:
    Long considered a morph of R. fantastica, Brown et all, 2008 elevated this banded frog to species status based on genetics, distribution and behavior. (1) Brown et al. (2008) showed this species forms a clade sister to Ranitomeya fantastica. This species was previously considered to be a morph of R. fantastica until more detailed investigations revealed that these frogs were distinct with respect to morphology, call, and genetics. (2)

    Ranitomeya summersi is a large species of Ranitomeya, with adults reaching 20.4 mm SVL. Adults have a black body with conspicuous orange ‘rings’ encircling the body and outlining the top of the head. An orange line is also present running along the dorsal surface of each limb. Ventral coloration is black with irregular orange lines. Little variation has been documented in this species, although the dorsal orange markings are sometimes broken or have branching patterns.

  • General Care:
    Ranitomeya summersi is a diurnal, terrestrial species. Little is known about the breeding behavior in the wild, but adults can frequently be found in Dieffenbachia axils which contain water. Courtship and egg deposition take place in leaf litter. Clutches consist of 4-9 eggs. Tadpoles are transported by the male to water bodies in tree holes or Dieffenbachia axils. These frogs can be found in disturbed areas, and can be locally abundant, especially in habitats with high densities of Dieffenbachia.(2)

  • Breeding & tadpole Care:

  • Pictures:

References:
(1) Understory Enterprises Inc. - Ranitomeya summersi
(2) Dendrobates.org - Ranitomeya summersi
(3) AmphibiaWeb - Dendrobates summersi
 

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I think others have said that they will lay in film containers half way up a viv. Also it should be noted that they are extremly shy frogs and will hide most of the day. When I had mine they always hid in dark wet spots and the only time I saw them was when I turned the lights on.
J
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I think others have said that they will lay in film containers half way up a viv.
When you say half way up the viv, what size are you talking about? I put mine (need to take some pics) in a 40 vert, mainly because there was larger floor space and it was seeded with springtails, but I don't expect them to hike up to the top of that sucker. I plan to build another viv with more floorspace.
 

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I dont know thats what I remember hearing. I used to see mine at the top of an 18 cube exo. Most of the time they were in the bottom fot of the viv however.
J
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ranitomeya summersi
AKA: Ranitomeya fantastica, Dendrobates fantastica, Banded fants, yellow fants


  • Difficulty:
    Intermediate to Advanced

  • Location & History:
    This species occurs in the central Huallaga Canyon near the towns of Sauce and Chazuta in San Martin, Peru. This species appears to be primarily associated with premontane habitats, occurring up to 684 m elevation. Habitats tend to be relatively dry, with reduced rainfall between the months of June through September. (1)

  • Descriptions & Behavior:
    Long considered a morph of R. fantastica, Brown et all, 2008 elevated this banded frog to species status based on genetics, distribution and behavior. (1) Brown et al. (2008) showed this species forms a clade sister to Ranitomeya fantastica. This species was previously considered to be a morph of R. fantastica until more detailed investigations revealed that these frogs were distinct with respect to morphology, call, and genetics. (2)

    Ranitomeya summersi is a large species of Ranitomeya, with adults reaching 20.4 mm SVL. Adults have a black body with conspicuous orange ‘rings’ encircling the body and outlining the top of the head. An orange line is also present running along the dorsal surface of each limb. Ventral coloration is black with irregular orange lines. Little variation has been documented in this species, although the dorsal orange markings are sometimes broken or have branching patterns.

  • General Care:
    Ranitomeya summersi is a diurnal, terrestrial species. Floorspace is more important than height of the tank, so more horizontally oriented tanks such as cubes, 20 high, etc are preferred. Summersi also seem to appreciate leaf litter over moss, which gives them more hiding spots and hunting grounds. In captivity their set up should be similar to their terrestrial relative, D. reticulatus. Film canisters are used, but should be at ground level or only slightly above. They can be extremly shy frogs and will hide most of the day.

  • Breeding & tadpole Care:
    Little is known about the breeding behavior in the wild, but adults can frequently be found in Dieffenbachia axils which contain water. Courtship and egg deposition take place in leaf litter. Clutches consist of 4-9 eggs. Tadpoles are transported by the male to water bodies in tree holes or Dieffenbachia axils. These frogs can be found in disturbed areas, and can be locally abundant, especially in habitats with high densities of Dieffenbachia.(2)

    In captivity adults have been known to lay eggs in film canisters half way up the vivarium, ~ 6" to 12". Film canisters should tilted at a slight angle.

  • Pictures:



    Photo summited by Corey Wickliffe (c) 2006


    Pigface


    Bojan


    Bojan


    Julio


    Brooklyn Dart Frogs

References:
(1) Understory Enterprises Inc. - Ranitomeya summersi
(2) Dendrobates.org - Ranitomeya summersi
(3) AmphibiaWeb - Dendrobates summersi
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well funny thing...my summersi (I thought) hang out mostly in the leaf litter. Turns out they laid eggs (they look good) about 30" up. So apparently they are not always hanging out down there. :)

For my own selfish reasons, any info on tadpole care that we can add to the care sheet? Food, water, container, community raising?
 

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Excellent! I kept mine like all my other Ranitomeya: individually in about 50mL of water, temperature ~74-76, food is sinking pellets. I don't care for frog and tadpole bites when working in that small of a volume of water. I use hikari micro pellets and a New Life Spectrum sinking pellets.

Just a question to clarify something in the care sheet, when you say a tilted film canister, does that mean opening up or down? Mine laid eggs in horizontal canisters all the time so I never tried tilting.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Update because some asked for the care sheet and deleted a few pictures that were no longer showing up. Added habitat video and more pics with comparison of R. imitator.

Ranitomeya summersi
AKA: Ranitomeya fantastica, Dendrobates fantastica, Banded fants, yellow fants


  • Difficulty:
    Intermediate to Advanced

  • Location & History:
    This species occurs in the central Huallaga Canyon near the towns of Sauce and Chazuta in San Martin, Peru. This species appears to be primarily associated with premontane habitats, occurring up to 684 m elevation. Habitats tend to be relatively dry, with reduced rainfall between the months of June through September. (1)

  • Descriptions & Behavior:
    Long considered a morph of R. fantastica, Brown et all, 2008 elevated this banded frog to species status based on genetics, distribution and behavior. (1) Brown et al. (2008) showed this species forms a clade sister to Ranitomeya fantastica. This species was previously considered to be a morph of R. fantastica until more detailed investigations revealed that these frogs were distinct with respect to morphology, call, and genetics. (2)

    Ranitomeya summersi is a large species of Ranitomeya, with adults reaching 20.4 mm SVL. Adults have a black body with conspicuous orange ‘rings’ encircling the body and outlining the top of the head. An orange line is also present running along the dorsal surface of each limb. Ventral coloration is black with irregular orange lines. Little variation has been documented in this species, although the dorsal orange markings are sometimes broken or have branching patterns.

  • General Care:
    Ranitomeya summersi is a diurnal, terrestrial species. Floorspace is more important than height of the tank, so more horizontally oriented tanks such as cubes, 20 high, etc are preferred. Summersi also seem to appreciate leaf litter over moss, which gives them more hiding spots and hunting grounds. In captivity their set up should be similar to their terrestrial relative, D. reticulatus. Film canisters are used, but should be at ground level or only slightly above. They can be extremly shy frogs and will hide most of the day.

  • Breeding & tadpole Care:
    Little is known about the breeding behavior in the wild, but adults can frequently be found in Dieffenbachia axils which contain water. Courtship and egg deposition take place in leaf litter. Clutches consist of 4-9 eggs. Tadpoles are transported by the male to water bodies in tree holes or Dieffenbachia axils. These frogs can be found in disturbed areas, and can be locally abundant, especially in habitats with high densities of Dieffenbachia.(2)

    In captivity adults have been known to lay eggs in film canisters taking full advantage of a 40 gallon breeder vert. Film canisters (black and clear) should tilted at a slight angle.

  • Pictures:



    Photo submitted by Corey Wickliffe (c) 2006


    Photo submitted by Pigface


    Photo submitted by Julio


    Photo submitted by Brooklyn Dart Frogs






    Bottom picture is that of R. imitator (Not the differences in coloration (dorsally) above and below the eye
    Photos submitted by Stemcellular




  • Habitat

    References:
    (1) Understory Enterprises Inc. - Ranitomeya summersi
    (2) Dendrobates.org - Ranitomeya summersi
    (3) AmphibiaWeb - Dendrobates summersi
 
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