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Dendrobates Imitator:
  • Difficulty: Intermediate - Based on size and speed.
    [/*:m:wzppuo3x]
  • Location & History: The north east of Peru; Discovered by: R. Schulte, 1968 (1)
    [/*:m:wzppuo3x]
  • Descriptions & Behavior:
    Generally outgoing to mildly skittish.
    D. i. imitator - Morphs: standard/green, tera pota/orange. Generally mimics variabilis.
    D. i. intermedius - standard, banded. Generally mimics banded/yellow fantasticus morphs.
    D. i. yurimaguensis - generally mimics ventrimaculatus.
    [/*:m:wzppuo3x]
  • General Care:
    Temperatures from 70-80ºF day time but prefer the lower 70's.

    Humidity of at least 80%

    Can be kept in groups (5+) or pairs... tor recomends 3.3 groups. (2)
    With increased group size, enclosure dimensions become very important. Significant intra sex aggression has been noticed for both sexes - maybe necessary to remove frogs that were raised together as froglets due to the intensity of the aggression.

    Will use vertical space if offered but not required. People have had good luck with everything from a standard 10 gal to larger enclosures.
    [/*:m:wzppuo3x]
  • Breeding & tadpole Care:
    Clutch size - small, 3-8

    Matures quickly, often in 7-8 months. Males may call as early as 5 months (or before?). Call sounds like a cricket chirp, fairly quiet. Facultative egg feeders; male will call to entice females to lay food eggs periodically. Many behaviors otherwise missed can be observed by allowing parental care of (at least some) tadpoles.

    Will breed in film canisters vertical oriented down for egg laying, vertically oriented leaves, especially overlapping, and other vertical surfaces usually above ground level. Film canisters oriented up filled with water for tadpole depositing (also broms will work). Tadpoles can be raised by parents, or pulled and raised individually. (2)

    Tadpole care - raised individually on fish flakes or mostly protein based diet, detritus (decaying leaves, dead FFs, not really algae based stuff).
    [/*:m:wzppuo3x]
  • Pictures:[/*:m:wzppuo3x]

References:
(1) www.poison-frogs.com, dart poison frogs, vivaria, plants, together with lots of pictures, films and more. Orchids, bromelia's, mosses, descriptions of dendrobates leucomelas, azureus, pumilio, tinctorius, auratus and how to breed frogs but also fruit
(2)Natures-Web.org - Tor Linbo's Frog Profiles

Contributers:
Kyle Kopp (kyle1745)
 

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Behavior - generally outgoing to mildly skittish.

Do we list subspecies and their respective morphs?
- D. i. imitator - Morphs: standard/green, tera pota/orange. Generally mimics variabilis.
- D. i. intermedius - standard, banded. Generally mimics banded/yellow fantasticus morphs.
- D. i. yurimaguensis - generally mimics ventrimaculatus.

Can be kept in groups (5+) or pairs... I personally go for groups for dynamics, and tor recomends 3.3 groups.

Breeding locations & Habits: film canisters vertical oriented down for egg laying, vertically oriented leaves, especially overlapping, and other vertical surfaces usually above ground level. Film canisters oriented up filled with water for tadpole depositing (also broms will work). Tadpoles can be raised by parents, or pulled and raised individually.

Viv type - vertially oriented

Clutch size - small, 3-8?

Tadpole care - raised individually on fish flakes or mostly protien based diet, detritus (decaying leaves, dead FFs, not really algae based stuff).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I guess the questions is do any of the subspecies require special care. We could do a separate care sheet in those cases and reference it in the main one. Or just make the main one more general. We could also list subspecies as a separate description at the bottom.
 

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As far as I know all the subspecies and their respective morphs have the same care, just that some (banded intermedius, tera pota imitator, and yuris) are rarer in the hobby... tera pota have proven to be harder to breed and raise tads than the standard imitator and standard intermedius, but I think the banded inter and yuris may be similar in care to the standards, just that they aren't well established in the hobby yet and should be left to advanced keepers to they can. Description section is where I expected that info to be... just kinda have it sectioned into the 3 subspecies, then the morphs within the subspecies I guess?
 

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Standard intermedius froglet... I have a lot of pics of standard intermedius, showing the variation if you want them... I have some of the Tor Linbo bloodline as well with the sky blue legs. I'll upload them later.

 

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KeroKero said:
Behavior - generally outgoing to mildly skittish.
Sounds good


KeroKero said:
Can be kept in groups (5+) or pairs... I personally go for groups for dynamics, and tor recomends 3.3 groups.
With increased group size, enclosure dimensions become very important. I have noticed signficant intrasex aggression for both sexes - and had to remove frogs that were raised together as froglets due to the intensity of the aggression - only frog I have ever had to do that for.

KeroKero said:
Breeding locations & Habits: film canisters vertical oriented down for egg laying, vertically oriented leaves, especially overlapping, and other vertical surfaces usually above ground level. Film canisters oriented up filled with water for tadpole depositing (also broms will work). Tadpoles can be raised by parents, or pulled and raised individually.
I have also had more success with canisters at an angle of 45 degrees - again with water as you mentioned. I have also had them lay on the glass walls of the viv.

KeroKero said:
Clutch size - small, 3-8?
I think 8 may be too high. I have never had my group lay more than 3 eggs at a time - and 90% of the time it is 2 eggs - but this is just my pair. What have you others experienced?
 

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Breeding habits: matures quickly, often in 7-8 months. Males may call as early as 5 months (or before?). Call sounds like a cricket chirp, fairly quiet. Facultative egg feeders; male will call to entice females to lay food eggs periodically. Many behaviors otherwise missed can be observed by allowing parental care of (at least some) tadpoles.
 

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Kyle - every pic that is "approved" for these caresheets I can add a watermark to if it isn't already.

One thing I'd like to see is the caresheets taking advantage of the glossary... when glossary terms are used, the word would be a link people could click on and get the definition. I know this takes a lot of editing work lol, but I'm willing to put my money (or time) where my mouth is and help with the editing if you want.

In this case I think labling the Species Group for the species in question, with a link to the species group definition in the glossary will help. In my definitions of the species groups I've worked up, breeding is included (characteristic breeding style of the groups) but also working up glossary terms for the breeding style (like facultative eggfeeder in the Breeding Locations & Habits section) woud be awesome as well.

The vertical film canisters - should have mentioned that was off NAtures-Web.org/Tor Linbo, I've never used film canisters with them lol. Most of the time I never even saw eggs... I just pulled out the broms and kept flushing out tadpoles... I guess 8 is way high, 2-3 is more common, but I believe they've had up to 5 in a clutch for me, but thats extreme.
 

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Had a chance to play with this one tonight. If you object to anything, notice any mistakes, etc. just post 'em.

I put a couple of pics of my own in to figure out how to watermark - remove them if you have some that are better. There also is a pic from Corey that needs her watermark.

I also should be able to get some Yuri pics later this week.

***Just noticed that you did the same thing Kyle - this is the second time for that - guess great minds think alike.


Dendrobates imitator:
  • Difficulty: Intermediate – Based on size and speed.
    [/*:m:2o28g6gw]
  • Location & History – Rainforests of northeastern Peru. Discovered by Schulte (1986, 1999). (1,2)
    [/*:m:2o28g6gw]
  • Descriptions & Behavior: Small outgoing to mildly skittish frog. The common name of this species is the mimic poison frog due to their resemblance to other dendrobatids. Three subspecies are recognized:

    Note: These morphs represent unique subpopulations in the wild that share general physical characterisitics, and for that reason different morphs should not be mixed.

    Dendrobates imitator imitator– 2 morphs – Standard/green and Terapota/orange. Display black spots on a metallic green or orange background. Legs can be metallic green to blue in color with black spots. Generally mimics D. variabilis. Terapota imitators are relatively rare in the hobby, and should be considered an advanced frog.

    Dendrobates imitator intermedius – 2 morphs – Standard and banded. Display orange lines on a black background. Legs may be orange/black or contain blue/green markings. Generally mimics the banded/yellow morphs of D. fantasticus. Due to the rarity of the banded morph, they should be considered an advanced frog.

    Dendrobates imitator yurimaguensis – Relatively rare in the hobby, yuri imitators display orange/yellow lines running the length of the body contrasting against a black background. Legs are blue/green. Generally mimics D. ventrimaculatus. Due to their rarity, yurimaguensis should be considered an advanced frog.
    [/*:m:2o28g6gw]
  • General Care:
    Temperature range of 70-80º F during the day; nighttime temp drop of up to 10º F if possible

    D. imitator can be housed in pairs or in groups (5+). Housing groups in large enclosures may allow for dynamic behavior observations. However, care should be taken as male-male and female-female aggression can occur.

    Vertically oriented enclosures (vertical 10g, 20H) are necessary, as these frogs make regular use of the vertical space, and only occasionally spend time on the viv floor. Bromeliads, large-leaved plants, and vines covering the background (such as creeping fig) offer the frogs security as well as sleeping locations.
    [/*:m:2o28g6gw]
  • Breeding & tadpole Care:
    Frogs mature quickly (7-8 months), and males may even begin calling as early as 5 months. Call is very audible, and resembles a cricket chirp. Males will call from laying location to attract female.

    Multiple areas serve as acceptable laying sites for D. imitator including film canisters (black and white) containing water oriented vertically or at a 45 degree angle, bromeliad leaves and axils, vertically oriented leaves (especially overlapping), and even the walls of the vivarium. Tadpoles can be raised by the parents or pulled from the viv.

    Typically 1-3 eggs laid as often as every 5-7 days, but clutch sizes up to 5 eggs have been observed.

    Tadpoles may exhibit cannibalism and should be housed individually. (3) Tadpoles can be fed fish flakes or another mostly protein based diet and detritus (decaying leaves and dead FFs), but it is not recommended to raise tadpoles on a mostly algae based diet. Due to the size of froglets, a readily available supply of springtails is important for young froglets, but stunted and wingless melanogaster will be taken soon after morphing.
    [/*:m:2o28g6gw]
  • Pictures:
    Standard Imitator male transporting tad:

    Standard Imitator tad morphing:

    Standard Imitator froglet:

    Standard Imitator Sex Comparison (Female - Left; Male - Right)

    Standard Intermedius:


    Standard Intermedius parental care:

    D. imitator yurimaguensis:



    [/*:m:2o28g6gw]
References:
(1) http://www.poison-frogs.com/
(2) http://research.amnh.org/herpetology/amphibia/index.php
(3) http://www.natures-web.org - Tor Linbo


Contributers:
Corey Wickliffe (kerokero)
Kyle Kopp (kyle1745)
npaull
Bill (elmoisfive)
Oz (rozdaboff)


If you would like to see any updates or modifications to this care sheet please let myself or a moderator know.
 

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One last thing for you taxonomists - on http://www.poison-frogs.com - it says that Imitator was discovered by Shulte in 1968. But on the amphibian species of the world site - it says 1986 (as well as 1999 for yuris and intermedius) - so which is correct?
 

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I'd go with AMNH site - they are referencing the papers where the animals were described and recognized by science. Schulte may have "discovered" them in 1968, but they were not published until later, and we should follow the papers.
 

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Standard Intermedius w/ blue legs (NOT terapota, just showing variation):


Standard Inter froglets:


If you still like the original standard inter pic I'll watermark that one as well.
 

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Bump.

This one looks near completed as well - although I think we could use better images.

Corey - I like the standard Intermedius pic already in the sheet the best - could you watermark it?
 

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A few additional pics per your suggestion Oz...



I may have a better photo comparing standard imi male and female so will have to look



Standard imi male with tad



I have a few other nice close shots of intermedius as well...will have to dig them up



Intermedius parental care....good pic except for the glare...but it was a night time shot.

Bill
 

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Well I thought I had a better one of a male/female imi pair but they always seem to manage to have one of them twisted the wrong way for a good body comparison....I'll keep working on it though :wink: and we can add after this sheet gets posted. I think it is helpful to have some type of reference in that regard in helping newcomers sex their thumbnails.

Bill
 
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