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I've searched high and low for good thumbnails prices and have come up empty handed, but I do see Tads going for $15-30 which is ideal for me for now. I've gone through many tadpole raising threads and although they recommend against complete beginners I would t throw me into that pile, would it be a bad idea to grow some imitative out for my first darts?

I would not just toss them I. Water and expect survival I'll plan plan and plan some more and set up mature pools in a controlled environment, there is a thread in the breeding section I will link to when I get home to further explain the plan.

Just thought I'd give it a try my experience lies with breeding pythons fish and keeping other reptiles so I figured I'd ask before I try and post when I do it and get yelled At succeed or fail, I admit I still have alot to learn and I wont be doing this for several months
 

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I got my first trio of of thumbs as tads. IMO if your lookin to safe ALOT of money and have patients Id say go for it! Its really not that hard just feed alittle bit couple times a week and when the water stinks change alittle out with a turkey baster and put bottled water " I use RODI because i have a filter". I also used a indian almond leaf in each cup which kept the tannin levels up but i hear you can make "tad tea" from oak leaves too. it will take 2-3 months for them to goto tads-froglets but the experience is definetly worth it. GL
_Dillon
 

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Yo do realize you get buy froglet thumbnails from $30-45 a piece right? I even saw a sponsor on here has a probable pair of vents for $114!


I've searched high and low for good thumbnails prices and have come up empty handed, but I do see Tads going for $15-30 which is ideal for me for now. I've gone through many tadpole raising threads and although they recommend against complete beginners I would t throw me into that pile, would it be a bad idea to grow some imitative out for my first darts?

I would not just toss them I. Water and expect survival I'll plan plan and plan some more and set up mature pools in a controlled environment, there is a thread in the breeding section I will link to when I get home to further explain the plan.

Just thought I'd give it a try my experience lies with breeding pythons fish and keeping other reptiles so I figured I'd ask before I try and post when I do it and get yelled At succeed or fail, I admit I still have alot to learn and I wont be doing this for several months
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The price of 10 each is preferred id like some imitative I like the reinforcement in my plan thanks Alot, from what I read keeping it kind of dirty is fine but I'll be visiting local breeders to take notes and advice as well as look at viva :p
 

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The price of 10 each is preferred id like some imitative I like the reinforcement in my plan thanks Alot, from what I read keeping it kind of dirty is fine but I'll be visiting local breeders to take notes and advice as well as look at viva :p

Yup dirty is fine, ive herd guys who never do water changes say their tads are fine. You need to come to the SCADS meet in december!
 

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If you're willing to wait 3 months for frogs, I think raising tads is great :D

I raised my sip from a tad and she is huge and beautiful and worth the wait. There is such satisfaction when they morph.

For the water, I use a bottle of dechlorinated tap water that has a few leaves floating in it, and fill/refill tad cups from it. In the tad cup, I put a few pieces of leaves for them to hide under and chew on. Sometimes I add a little moss. I do partial changes, to clean out the tad poo and uneaten food.

If you do it, I hope you'll post pics of your progress :p
 

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I began my dart frog hobby with 6 tads of D. tinctorius from my mom. I think it was a very good thing for me, as it allowed me to set up the viv and and grow it out, etc while the tads were growing. It also gave me time to really get the culturing right, and allowed more time to read.

JBear
 

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I imagine it's possible to raise tads as a first timer. Ultimately, it's all about be careful and paying close attention to the details that are crucial for keeping something alive. When it comes to thumbnail darts (I'm guessing you are referring to Ranitomeya imitator), you are going to need loads of springtails and other small feeders to ensure that they'll get enough food until they're ready for FFs. Are you ready for that? Sometimes a springtails culture can take a long time before it starts booming.

But the bigger issue is this: if you are thinking about tadpoles to save a few bucks ($30-50 per frog) then can you afford to keep them? Ultimately, the cost of a couple frogs is a drop in the bucket compared to the cost of a good tank, plants, lights, startup cultures, culture supplies, supplements, etc. In the end, I don't think one should risk a living creature to save a few bucks.
 

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I'm a bit surprised nobody has pointed out the possible drawbacks. First of all, not all tads morph out correctly. They can seem to be doing fine and then just drop dead. They can pop their front legs only to find out they are useless, tiny, little things (spindly leg syndrome). Even after they pop their front legs, they can die for no apparent reason while their internals are shifting and changing, getting ready to be a frog. This can be very disheartening. Especially if this is your first attempt, you have no frogs yet, and all your hopes are hanging on this.
We were recently given some tads that had been community raised for a while before they got to us. When they got bigger, we could see where one of the legs had been bitten off as a young tad. http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/breeding-eggs-tadpoles/62641-communal-tad-death.html My son, Frogboy, had to learn one of the hardest lessons in frogging at a young age when we were forced to put him down.
Keep in mind that somebody with too many tads to handle may not have been taking proper care of them. They may have been communally raised or not given proper nutrition. It's possible that they already have no chance at a real life before you ever get them.
Spindly leg syndrome has been linked to the nutrition of the parents. It is possible that the tads you receive had no chance to survive since before the eggs were ever laid!
A person new to frogging can be easily crushed when his "first" dies. This can be so discouraging as to turn them away from trying again, thinking that they cannot possibly raise them.
Obviously, I am of the opinion that first time froggers are better off with a couple of nice, fat, well started froglets from a reputable breeder.
If you choose to go the tadpole route, I wish you the best of luck. I just feel it was important to point out the potential pitfalls.
Remember, if you try it, and they do not thrive, it may not be your fault. Try it again with a froglet.
 

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I picked up some tads when I was 2 months into the hobby, just do your research and you should be fine.

Sent from my DROID2 GLOBAL using Tapatalk
 

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I picked up some tads when I was 2 months into the hobby, just do your research and you should be fine.

Sent from my DROID2 GLOBAL using Tapatalk
Exactly. I was breeding, and raising the tads of, a pair of Standard Lamasii when I'd been in the hobby only 2-3 months. Everything was fine and they bred like rabbits.

No, I don't have them anymore. They weren't mine. No PMs please :p
 

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My G/F and I are on a tad only kick until the hobby allows us some trades or we raise the money back for more species. If you can follow a basic dart/tad husbandry and alter a little depending on the dart/tad species, go for it. Just don't count your chickens before they hatch. Sometimes ( from my experience and what I've read, shit happens.). It's definitely a cheaper and more exciting way to get into the hobby raising your own frogs. if you have some dedication and patience, I think things will turn out well given proper research.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I began my dart frog hobby with 6 tads of D. tinctorius from my mom. I think it was a very good thing for me, as it allowed me to set up the viv and and grow it out, etc while the tads were growing. It also gave me time to really get the culturing right, and allowed more time to read.

JBear
i forgot to mention but this is the exact reason i want to raise from tad, i am in the buying everything stage of my viv and hope after a few months of plant growth to have mini frogs to go in it, this is very reassuring thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I'm a bit surprised nobody has pointed out the possible drawbacks. First of all, not all tads morph out correctly. They can seem to be doing fine and then just drop dead. They can pop their front legs only to find out they are useless, tiny, little things (spindly leg syndrome). Even after they pop their front legs, they can die for no apparent reason while their internals are shifting and changing, getting ready to be a frog. This can be very disheartening. Especially if this is your first attempt, you have no frogs yet, and all your hopes are hanging on this.
We were recently given some tads that had been community raised for a while before they got to us. When they got bigger, we could see where one of the legs had been bitten off as a young tad. http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/breeding-eggs-tadpoles/62641-communal-tad-death.html My son, Frogboy, had to learn one of the hardest lessons in frogging at a young age when we were forced to put him down.
Keep in mind that somebody with too many tads to handle may not have been taking proper care of them. They may have been communally raised or not given proper nutrition. It's possible that they already have no chance at a real life before you ever get them.
Spindly leg syndrome has been linked to the nutrition of the parents. It is possible that the tads you receive had no chance to survive since before the eggs were ever laid!
A person new to frogging can be easily crushed when his "first" dies. This can be so discouraging as to turn them away from trying again, thinking that they cannot possibly raise them.
Obviously, I am of the opinion that first time froggers are better off with a couple of nice, fat, well started froglets from a reputable breeder.
If you choose to go the tadpole route, I wish you the best of luck. I just feel it was important to point out the potential pitfalls.
Remember, if you try it, and they do not thrive, it may not be your fault. Try it again with a froglet.
I must say I like you =p. solid advice and it makes me think twice about what i may do. and I have experienced such a thing before with snakes. I have a while to consider it, i don't have delicups or my mistking yet so all i can do is read plan and buy stuff recommended, i will be ordering that repashy once i get the first viv planted i may still do tads but i'll make sure to get them from a good breeder with lots of information. i'll find the post i wish to follow in my incubator, thanks again and it is sad to think i may have to put a frog down.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I imagine it's possible to raise tads as a first timer. Ultimately, it's all about be careful and paying close attention to the details that are crucial for keeping something alive. When it comes to thumbnail darts (I'm guessing you are referring to Ranitomeya imitator), you are going to need loads of springtails and other small feeders to ensure that they'll get enough food until they're ready for FFs. Are you ready for that? Sometimes a springtails culture can take a long time before it starts booming.

But the bigger issue is this: if you are thinking about tadpoles to save a few bucks ($30-50 per frog) then can you afford to keep them? Ultimately, the cost of a couple frogs is a drop in the bucket compared to the cost of a good tank, plants, lights, startup cultures, culture supplies, supplements, etc. In the end, I don't think one should risk a living creature to save a few bucks.
the cost shouldn't be too big a problem, im also used to keeping most insects, ffs being a new one however, springtails i have had on accident and plan on getting a few healthy cultures going along with in viv with some rolly pollies, in a few weeks i'll also be getting the 18x18x24 exo terra, too bad it is a kit. and the tads may not be that much, atleast im hoping cause i could get imitator froglets for 45-55
 
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