Dendroboard banner
1 - 20 of 59 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have researched this species and there seems to be a very limited amount of information about them. I am getting 6 of them, they are shipping out in November so I still have quite a bit of time to get ready for them. I would like to just discuss what people have heard or any kind of info related to the R. Benedictas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,186 Posts
I keep my benedicta just like R. fantastica; check out the R. fantastica care sheet. All the habits/behaviors are the same except their call is much louder (almost as loud an an imitator).

Also, (like fantastica) the lower the light level on the floor of the enlcosure the more active they will be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I keep my benedicta just like R. fantastica; check out the R. fantastica care sheet. All the habits/behaviors are the same except their call is much louder (almost as loud an an imitator).

Also, (like fantastica) the lower the light level on the floor of the enlcosure the more active they will be.
Cool! how many do you have?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
are they as bold as fantastica .my fanticasticas are both males . but there are very bold . cut plants right in front of there face and they don't move . dump spring tail right in front there face . still nothing . if there not out couple sprays with the mister .and there they come .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,186 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,186 Posts
Tanks a lot smaller than 90 gallons.

Bigger is usually better, just remember to get enough food into the larger enclosures so that the prey density is high enough. Not that most people don't already overfeed, but I have seen thumbs do badly in large enclosures because they didn't get enough food.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,180 Posts
Tanks a lot smaller than 90 gallons.

Bigger is usually better, just remember to get enough food into the larger enclosures so that the prey density is high enough. Not that most people don't already overfeed, but I have seen thumbs do badly in large enclosures because they didn't get enough food.
This is a consideration I have somehow overlooked, and almost presents a downside to keeping darts in huge tanks. I guess a large batch of seeders and a great many cultures constantly booming is easy for some, but I KNOW I would fall short along the line. Thanks for the perspective! It really was a good info "nugget"!

JBear
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,029 Posts
There's actually been quite a bit of discussion around the board about R. benedicta. They're a new species to the US hobby, but there is lots of information out there. A large bromeliad with a few smaller peripheral broms is good. Low light in the lower levels. They are generally a particularly shy species to start out with, but they become bolder as they enter breeding phases. They're really not much different than fantasticus. Although their call is typially louder... I'm not sure I would go as far as to say imitator loudness, but it's at least noticable....
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
52 Posts
Have you taken a look at the Zootaxa done on Benedictas and Fantasticus in 2008. You can do an internet search and it should pop up. I have learned a lot from my Benedictas. Not long ago I switched them to a very well planted tall and deep 80 gal tank and their behavior changed drastically. I also feed them fruit flies that can actually fly and they seem to like that better than the flightless ones. I see all six everyday. Love it. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Have you taken a look at the Zootaxa done on Benedictas and Fantasticus in 2008. You can do an internet search and it should pop up. I have learned a lot from my Benedictas. Not long ago I switched them to a very well planted tall and deep 80 gal tank and their behavior changed drastically. I also feed them fruit flies that can actually fly and they seem to like that better than the flightless ones. I see all six everyday. Love it. :)
Wow! do you have any pics of that I would love to see it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,186 Posts
Although their call is typially louder... I'm not sure I would go as far as to say imitator loudness, but it's at least noticable....
Check out the call volume reported in the species description paper. It's pretty close to imitators. I think the lower pitch makes it seem a bit quieter than it actually is. Still if you can't hear it through the glass as well as an imitator, then functionally it isn't as loud in captivity.

It is nice to hear a different call from time to time. The trilling gets a bit old.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,029 Posts
Check out the call volume reported in the species description paper. It's pretty close to imitators. I think the lower pitch makes it seem a bit quieter than it actually is. Still if you can't hear it through the glass as well as an imitator, then functionally it isn't as loud in captivity.

It is nice to hear a different call from time to time. The trilling gets a bit old.
Oh, I can hear all of my fantastica clade frogs. I can hear my variabilis too.... I'd still say I can hear my variabilis significantly louder than my benedicta. Benedicta are louder than any of my other fants, but my southern variabilis are louder than my variabilis.

The O. pumilio call and the trilling imitator clade frogs does get old sometimes.... I really like the mellow call of the fantastica clade. Actually... you want annoying, get some bassleri in breeding season.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Have you taken a look at the Zootaxa done on Benedictas and Fantasticus in 2008. You can do an internet search and it should pop up. I have learned a lot from my Benedictas. Not long ago I switched them to a very well planted tall and deep 80 gal tank and their behavior changed drastically. I also feed them fruit flies that can actually fly and they seem to like that better than the flightless ones. I see all six everyday. Love it. :)
Taking some inspiration from this, I set up a breeding tank measuring 45 x 90 x 55 cm with 4 pairs and provided flighted fruit flies dispensed from a plastic trap...



However, I found that while some were able to ambush and stalk the flighted FF at corners and top edges of their viv; others were not doing so well and had to be given supplementary addition of regular vestigial-winged FFs and other small insects.

But they made an interesting exhibit to look at and here are some of the inhabitants which appeared for photos...





 
1 - 20 of 59 Posts
Top