Dendroboard banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
391 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I have a couple of questions, and I'm not sure if this warrants an entire thread but I wasn't sure what other means I had.

1) Is it possible to spray paint or otherwise change the color of Hygrolon fabric? It seems like great and immensly useful stuff that I would be able to use if it weren't naturally black. I was hoping I could color it brown in order to make some things in my vivaria look more natural.

2) Is it possible to fork the tube of a single waterfall pump, in order to get two waterfalls out of one pump? I'd looked into this many months ago when I was building a tall terrarium that might have used that sort of thing, but the only thing that looked like it really split the water flow was very large and probably unusable for all but the largest vivaria. I'm really just curious now, because I have a pump with way too high GPH for a single waterfall and I think it would be neat if I could split its flow.

Thanks for your consideration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
391 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I hate to double-post, but I have a third question I can't edit in:

3) Are all I need to drain a vivarium a bulkhead, a ball valve, and tubing, all of the appropriate size? I'm no plumber, and I'm having trouble figuring this out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
I'll try to answer some of these for you.
1 - I think painting the Hygrolon fabric will nullify its usefulness. Given enough time, plants, moss, etc will cover the hygrolon and it won't be an issue.

2 - You probably can fork the water flow from the pump. However, if something slows the flow to one end, the other will begin to receive even more water. The same will also happen with the length of tubing after the fork. The longer end will need more pressure to push it all the way to the end. This will inadverdently lead to a "blockage" and you will see more flow to the shorter end. You can add some sort of ball valve to keep the pressures equal to both sides and that should solve the issue. The tricky part here would be having access to the valves so they can be adjusted over time.

3 - I have a bulkhead in one of my tanks. I added some tubing and just let it flow as needed into a bucket in the stand, no ball valve needed. If space is an issue, then you can add the ball valve and drain as needed. Inside the tank, you can use a piece of PVC to set the height of water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
391 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you, especially for the info on forking waterfalls. I kind of figured out the thing with the bulkhead --- evidently it usually comes with a stopper --- and someone on a separate website suggested that I try to stain the hygrolon with coffee or pecan hulls, or perhaps even wood stain, something that might not interfere with it in the same way paint does.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,044 Posts
I'm going to combine answers to questions 2 and 3.

To "fork" the water coming out of a strong pump you can do a few things. It really depends most on how many destinations (either unique tanks, or different outlets within one) you have for the water. More below.

I find pure gravity with no impediments (valves etc) to be the best force for removing water from tanks. Just put a hose on the bulkhead and run it to a bucket or sump. No valve. If you want a little dead pool under your false bottom, for RH or sub-irrigation or whatever, put your bulkhead on the rear, not the bottom, of your tank, or, install a little standpipe onto your bottom-mount bulkhead.

Back to "forking". If you just have a single destination for the pumped water, just plumb in a Y or a T after the pump. On the line running to your tank, install a valve. Run the other line to the reservoir the pump is pulling from. Using that valve, dial the flow into your tank to whatever force you want in there, and let the remainder return directly back to the pump (where it's going anyway, right? you're just installing a little short-circuit).

More "forking". If you have >1 destination for your pumped water, install a manifold after the pump. All outgoing lines get a valve. If necessary, route one line to the reservoir as described above.

You can build your own manifold or buy it. There are many sizes (diameters, I mean) possible, but the cheapest to build are ones of common-sized valves and unions and tubing (e.g. 1/4, 1/2 and 3/4 inch, not 5/8 or 3/8). Incidentally, Marty sells manifolds for MistKing systems too. I've been thinking about a manifold for a bunch of drip walls I have; presently each has its own wimpy little pump (Tom's AL); I was thinking of beefing up to a single Avast and being able to "go way higher" (the Toms have crap head), but that would require more - and more complicated - plumbing. Also of course it would multiply the bad consequences of a pump failure.

I like valves because...well... life without them sucks. You just get too strong a flow here, and too weak a flow there, etc etc depending on the lengths of your different runs, the various elevations of your outlets above the reservoir, how many T's and elbows your runs might have, etc etc. All the water wants to run out the nearest, lowest, biggest hole. Everybody downstream gets shafted. Valves help you fix that.

Anyway...good luck!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
787 Posts
Wood stain could be really, really dangerous to add to anything that's going into a tank with frogs. It would be one thing if you were talking about using it on something that's sealed, which would still, in my mind, be questionable. Using it to stain something that's going to be part of your tank's ecosystem would be very risky. That's not to mention that I doubt it would even do anything to color a fabric that's already black.

If you want your tank to look more natural, you could use a moss mix that will eventually cover your hygrolon, which is usually the reason people even use it in the first place. Otherwise, perhaps you could replace it with another option. Filter foam has some color options, for example.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
391 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I discarded the wood stain idea for Rit polyester fabric stain, which I would be willing to discard anyway if it were going to be dangerous. My reason for changing the color is that it seems to take a while to cover hygrolon with moss ( actually, I have never seen it totally covered).

But these questions were hypothetical anyway. I dont have any hygrolon fabric yet, not would I be using them for frogs. All the same, thank you for that caution.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top