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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I purchased several poison dart frogs and it turns out the smallest one has the "short tongue" syndrome. The frog has a lot of trouble eating and I want to correct the problem. However, I can not really find anything that contains only or mostly Vitamin A. I have several supplemants, but I do not know the dosing on Vitamin A in them, if it would be enough to correct the problem. Vitamin A injections does not appear to be a good option, nor does force feeding. I have been applying a multi-vitamin supplemant topically, but again, I do not know how much vitamin A is in it. The only thing I found is Zoo Med Repti Turtle Eye Drops which I have. I want to know if it would be safe to use that with the frog. The ingredients are: Water (isotonic saline solution), solubizing hydrotope, Vitamin A palmitate in an oil base, and cyanocobalamin (Vitamin B12). Some of the ingredients wouldn't harm the frog, but I'm not entirely certain. The frog still has a good amount of energy left despite how skinny it is becoming, it goes for the flies with or without being dusted so that isn't the issue. I want to do something as soon as possible before its too late. Any information or other suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
 

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I was just about to recommend Repashy's product, as well; but I also try to gutload my feeder insects (near impossible for fruit flies, however) with steamed or fresh Vitamin A rich foods. e.g. sweet potato, yam, red papaya, carrot, pumpkin, orange flesh melons, and others.
 

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I was just about to recommend Repashy's product, as well; but I also try to gutload my feeder insects (near impossible for fruit flies, however) with steamed or fresh Vitamin A rich foods. e.g. sweet potato, yam, red papaya, carrot, pumpkin, orange flesh melons, and others.
Sadly, those do not constitute high vitamin A foods for amphibians or insects. The primary source of "vitamin A" in those foods are carotenes (example beta carotene), amphibians do not convert carotenes to vitamin A efficiently which is why we vitamin A deficiencies in the frogs. It should also be noted that insects do not convert or store vitamin A (the closest are some forms of rhodopsin in the eyes). As a result, this does nothing to resolve the deficiencies of vitamin A.

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have been dusting the flies and putting them in the freezer for a lil to slow them down, it helps the frog at least attempt to grab them and even if he doesn't ingest the flies and drops them, that lil bit he gets of the dust is better than nothing. I mostly sit the frog in water that I mixed supplements in. Because it has such a hard time eating the frog unfortunately started showing signs of a calcium deficiency and would go completely lame and I would gently pump it's chest and it would "come back" so to speak. Since I've been applying calcium topically it hasn't passed out anymore and does show progress. That is what made me start really looking into deficiencies and someone I know that works in the herpetology department at a zoo told me about the "short tongue" syndrome. I absolutely refuse to give up. I will most likely buy the repashy supplement.
 

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Sadly, those do not constitute high vitamin A foods for amphibians or insects. The primary source of "vitamin A" in those foods are carotenes (example beta carotene), amphibians do not convert carotenes to vitamin A efficiently which is why we vitamin A deficiencies in the frogs. It should also be noted that insects do not convert or store vitamin A (the closest are some forms of rhodopsin in the eyes). As a result, this does nothing to resolve the deficiencies of vitamin A.

Ed
Interesting feedback. I have received contradicting information from my Herp Vet and others in the hobby for many years. Do you have some references for this information? I would be interested in reading it. :)
 

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Interesting feedback. I have received contradicting information from my Herp Vet and others in the hobby for many years. Do you have some references for this information? I would be interested in reading it. :)
It was summarized to no small extent in TWIs Leaf Litter magazine 3(2); 4-7

Or you can look for access here and backtrack a lot of the articles
Pessier, A.; 2005; Suspected hypovitaminosis A

in captive toads (
Bufo ssp.); In Charlotte editor;
Proceedings of the American Association of Zoo
Veterinarians/American Association Wildlife
Veterinarians, American Zoo and Aquarium
Association Nutrition Advisory Group Joint
Conference; American Association of Zoo

Veterinarians, FL p.57

And Arizona Exotic Animal Hospital

Or you can search the multiple discussions with references on here..... as there have been citations on it as well here.....

Ed

 
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