Dendroboard banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,997 Posts
I`m researching sterilization technique for each parasite, such as drying kills hookworm, lungworm, chytrid(4hrs) etc.
bleach concentration and time necessary for rana virus
some protozoa die by drying, some don`t.
which temps and how long for baking and boiling for each parasite.
would this be the right place for a section like this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,997 Posts
I was just thinking of specifics for each type of parasite, a lot of people don`t like bleach or soaps or alcohol and would rather bake or dry things. especially w/ stuff like wood/cork/coco huts etc. if they find they had hookworm or lungworm or something it`s good to know you can dry things instead of having to bleach them. so if someone was treating a quarentine tank they could flop the frog and leave the tank open to dry for 2 days instead of bleaching.
It shouldn`t be more than a small list.
each parasite and techniques that work listed after.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
Virusan will get many viruses, but probably won't kill most parasite eggs. I'm unsure regarding protozoans, but some of the spores are harder to kill.
John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,179 Posts
Just to bump this with more information.

Survival of the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachoc...[Dis Aquat Organ. 2008] - PubMed Result

Hygiene protocols for handling amphibians in the field and in laboratories have been proposed to decrease the transmission of chytridiomycosis caused by infection with the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, which is responsible for global amphibian declines. However, these protocols are mainly based on theoretical principles. The aim of this study was to develop an evidence-based approach to amphibian handling hygiene protocols by testing the survival of B. dendrobatidis on human hands and various gloves. Bare or gloved human fingers were exposed to cultured zoospores and zoosporangia of B. dendrobatidis. Survival of B. dendrobatidis on hands and gloves was tested for up to 10 min post-exposure by inoculation onto tryptone/gelatin hydrolysate/lactose (TGhL) agar plates. The effects of repeated hand washings with water and with 70% ethanol and of washing gloves with water were also tested. Bare human skin demonstrated a fungicidal effect on B. dendrobatidis by 2 min and killed 100% of cells by 6 min, but this killing effect was reduced by repeated washing with water and ethanol. Nitrile gloves killed all B. dendrobatidis on contact, but washing in water decreased this effect. Latex and polyethylene gloves had no killing effect, and B. dendrobatidis survived for over 6 min. The killing effect of vinyl gloves varied with brands and batches. These results support the use of an unused pair of gloves for each new amphibian handled in either the field or the laboratory, and if this is not possible, bare hands are a preferable, although imperfect, alternative to continual use of the same pair of gloves.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top