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In my qt I always use paper towels to keep an eye on their feces. Thats usually the easiest indicator that something is wrong.
I would imagine dart frogs can be quarantined the same just on damp towels.
That's good reasoning.

I prefer to be able to gauge behavior, too, which will be affected by such a setup, especially (I would think) with more skittish species -- I really can't imagine housing thumbs in a sterile box for long, but I'll admit I haven't tried it, or even looked into others' experiences doing it. Seems each method of those two have their own pros and cons, and the judgement will depend on the keeper's relative concerns.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
That's good reasoning.

I prefer to be able to gauge behavior, too, which will be affected by such a setup, especially (I would think) with more skittish species -- I really can't imagine housing thumbs in a sterile box for long, but I'll admit I haven't tried it, or even looked into others' experiences doing it. Seems each method of those two have their own pros and cons, and the judgement will depend on the keeper's relative concerns.
I have found that as long as I provide adequate hides along with some faux plants that after a short adjustment period (typically a day or two) they tend to behave normally. The key I've found is to stick to a schedule. Normally by the end of quarantine the animal has learned the routine and tends to be waiting for me to inspect/feed.
 

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I have found that as long as I provide adequate hides along with some faux plants that after a short adjustment period (typically a day or two) they tend to behave normally. The key I've found is to stick to a schedule. Normally by the end of quarantine the animal has learned the routine and tends to be waiting for me to inspect/feed.
Are you talking about dart frogs?
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Tree monitors though have been by far the most temperamental I've dealt with. Although squams have tried my patience but typically its just their refusal to eat or better yet eat and regurgitate because they saw their own shadow.
 

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During quarantine I want my frogs to have a certain level of security, which means ample hiding places and an ability to at least exhibit some natural behaviors such as climbing, etc. In my opinion any quarantine setup that lacks these features has the potential to stress the frogs out. Stressed out frogs exhibit stressed out behaviors which defeats your observations of your animals during quarantine. I'm sure many of us have noticed the more hiding spots for frogs in our tanks, the more comfortable they feel and the more they allow observation. I'm sure very simplistic setups work for some frogs, others it may do more harm than good. Because my quarantines are temporary and are broken down after the process, I opt for a thick layer of leaf litter and some cuttings of hardy plants. Plenty of hiding spots and leaves for them to climb on.
 
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