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Discussion Starter #1
Curious as to how you all setup your quarantine set ups. I'm not new to herps just new to dart frogs. Normally I will quarantine a new monitor/snake for 90 days in a simplistic setup and call it good if I don't notice a visible issue. Is this similar practice with dart frogs.
 

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I dont Q if Im putting a single subject into their permanent enclosure, which is usually the case. However all husbandry actions between the new animal and the rest of the collection is separated by a wall, or room distance, and the frequent snap of nitrile.

All my Qs are case by case, with preference for glass tanks and single use cork harborage in various sizes since I have alot of it.
 

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In my personal collection I have only 1 dart - a rescue imitator in an 18x18 that ive had over a year but i still keep her in the far wing of our apartment away from my other anurans and herps. As I harbor concerns about FF walking out of her tank and into other encls.
 

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Due to the monitors I keep everything that comes into the house gets qt. Although monitors tend to be bullet proof in terms of everything but internal parasites i tend to be very cautious as some of them took years to aquire due to rarity and cost.
 

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and the frequent snap of nitrile.
Can hear it in my mind perfectly. I quarantine religiously since I have multiple setups. This includes frogs and plants. And like KMC I keep my new new acquisitions in different areas of my living abode than the rest of my collection. My setups now are quite simple but have varied quite a bit over my keeping. Some setups are more elaborate than others but now I mostly just use a moderate layer of leaf litter with a few easier plant clippings (pothos). I quarantine for a minimum of 8 weeks. You are wise to take precautions and not cut corners. I don't know the contagion level of amphibian disease to varanids, but why risk it.... or vice versa. Quarantine is easy enough and is only temporary.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sadly the frogs will need to be quarantined in the closet as I out of rooms to do so as the wife has one rule...no cages in bedrooms. But the rest for the house has been fair game and even ended up with a heated shed a few years ago to house my larger monitors. To date the only monitors she seems enjoy seeing daily has been my Kimberly rock monitors as they don't seem to eyeball you so much like their planning your demise.
 

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Have never kept any monitors but if I did Kimberly Rocks would be at the top of the list. Gorgeous animals! Pics!
 

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I think there is a wide range of QT practices. For some other herps that are are known to be somewhat regular sources of collection-ending pathogens (geckos, all snakes but especially boids), I'm pretty strict: fecal tests before leaving QT for those prone to intestinal pathogens, housed in separate room, QT animals are last care for the day, etc.

For darts, I don't buy from untrusted sources, and never WC, so the initial housing choice is made with an eye to observing the animals for proper behavior and feeding, and sometimes I split up groups to watch for hints about sexes so I can pair them off into their permanent enclosure. If I was buying animals that I had a hint that they might likely carry pathogens -- from a general pet store/mega online herp flipper/anywhere that the animals went through the wholesale system (which I personally wouldn't buy from), or WC (which no one should be buying save a handful of very experienced breeders) I'd do the separate room/final testing QT process.

My dart QT vivs are set up just like display vivs, but smaller.
 

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I think there is a wide range of QT practices. For some other herps that are are known to be somewhat regular sources of collection-ending pathogens (geckos, all snakes but especially boids), I'm pretty strict: fecal tests before leaving QT for those prone to intestinal pathogens, housed in separate room, QT animals are last care for the day, etc.

For darts, I don't buy from untrusted sources, and never WC, so the initial housing choice is made with an eye to observing the animals for proper behavior and feeding, and sometimes I split up groups to watch for hints about sexes so I can pair them off into their permanent enclosure. If I was buying animals that I had a hint that they might likely carry pathogens -- from a general pet store/mega online herp flipper/anywhere that the animals went through the wholesale system (which I personally wouldn't buy from), or WC (which no one should be buying save a handful of very experienced breeders) I'd do the separate room/final testing QT process.

My dart QT vivs are set up just like display vivs, but smaller.
I agree there are a wide variety of QT practices, some better than others. You are talking about decisions made prior to acquiring animals to help mitigate risk, all of which I completely agree with. All are good precautions. The caveat that I'll add to your mentioned preventative decisions on where to purchase your frogs is that it requires a pretty intimate understanding of the person's collection that you are sourcing from. Like if they themselves are experienced breeders keeping wild caught. When and where they have sourced new acquisitions to their collection and if where they sourced their animals from keeps wild caught (I'm not referring to flipping frogs just bringing additional animals into their collection for whatever reason). Etc. Even a trusted sources acquires new animals from time to time and that may be unknown to potential buyers. I guess my point is that even when purchasing from trusted/reputable sources there is an inherent level of risk. I know you weren't saying anything to the contrary, I just wanted to point out that people should never have an absolute level of confidence in where they purchase their frogs from and take reasonable precautions. What those precautions are is what is up for debate.
 

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In my qt I always use paper towels to keep an eye on their feces. Thats usually the easiest indicator that something is wrong.
I would imagine dart frogs can be quarantined the same just on damp towels.
I've seen keepers use that method successfully. Some go much more elaborate and do entirely natualistic smaller vivs for quarantine. And some find a healthy compromise between the minimalistic temporary quarantine setup and naturalistic masterpieces for quarantine. The point is that there is a period of isolation and observation away from the confines of any of the rest of your collection. Not necessarily saying in a different room. In a perfect world yes. But not everyone has that capability. Everyone should, however, take some reasonable precautions in my opinion. I understand "reasonable" is up for debate.
 
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