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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, just wondering if pumilios make a good first thumb. Searches of the forum seem to favor vents, imitators, and amazonicus, but where do pumilios sit?
 

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The pumilio group is considered by most to be the "trickiest".
If you have alot of experience with other darts, if you really want to try pumilio, and have the money, I say do you're homework, and then go for it. If however you end up with a chance to get rare(r) frogs like histrionicus, blue jeans, etc., you should let these go to experienced breeders.
For the most part, I don't recommend getting a specific frog just because someone recomends them as a "starter frog"...If you get the frogs you really want, chances are you'll pay more attention to them, and that goes a long way towards finding what makes these creatures tick.
That being said I would never recommend an >$100 frog for a beginner, but I also wouldn't recommend auratus as a beginner frog, alot of them are so shy, you don't see them much.
If you're considering the import pumilio...that's a whole other topic!
 

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Well first off, I'm not sure when pumilio started to be considered "thumbnails" but they seem to be commonly lumped into that group these days. Thumbnails use to just mean frogs from the quinquivittatus group of species. So that should provide a clue that learning how to keep and breed pumilio doesn't necessarily give you the skills to breed reticulatus or vice versa. That said, if you have been successful keeping and breeding other PDF, cb pumilio are actually fairly hardy animals. They are just difficult to breed. I would start with some good cb animals. If you are really wanting to learn how to keep thumbnails in the old sense of the term, then I would go with one imitator or vents. I DO recommend that people start with the so-called "starter frogs" when they are jumping into a new level of the hobby for a couple reasons. First, they are called starter frogs for a reason which means they are less likely to die as someone goes through the learning curve honing the skills to keep them. Secondly, I've seen many people start in this hobby by getting frogs that are difficult to keep. When those frogs die, they new hobbyist gets discouraged and quits. The saying "dead puppies aren't much fun" applies to frogs too.

So back to my original thought. I would consider the more commonly bred morphs of pumilio to be starter "egg feeder" frogs. NOT starter thumbnails. Egg feeders and the quinquivittatus group have significantly different life histories. I actually know some highly respected breeders who now hate the term thumbnail because a sort of status symbol has grown around collecting and breeding these little guys. They've seen people refuse to buy a frog they were intersted in simply because they learned it wasn't a "thumbnail".
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for your replies. When phrasing the question, I wasn't quite sure that it was appropriate to call pumilios "thumbnails" (it just felt wrong) - point well taken. I am interested in transitioning from the large and hardy D. tinc group of frogs to the smaller, more arboreal frogs like those in the D. vent group. What got me even thinking about cb pumilios is their reported boldness.
 

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verbal said:
Thanks for your replies. When phrasing the question, I wasn't quite sure that it was appropriate to call pumilios "thumbnails" (it just felt wrong) - point well taken. I am interested in transitioning from the large and hardy D. tinc group of frogs to the smaller, more arboreal frogs like those in the D. vent group. What got me even thinking about cb pumilios is their reported boldness.
You certainly aren't the first one to call them thumbnails. Size wise, the name fits so I can see why they started getting lumped. Pumilio are variable in their boldness. Some are really shy and others will not stop singing even when you are poking around in the viv inches away. In general the females seem more shy than the males from what I've seen with blue jeans. They also vary in how arboreal they are. Some spend most of their time low in leaf litter but males tend to climb up a foot or two to call and mate. For a really nice bold, arboreal frog with a fantastic call, I think it is hard to beat imitator. They are just really great frogs. Vents are very nice too but their call is just a whisper to my aged ears.
 

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I do agree that in terms of a beginner frog for breeding purposes, pumilio aren't the best choice. But for someone with some experience with darts in general, they can make great display animals at the very least. My male bastis all have been very bold, and the one I recently paired up with a female won't shut up! You would however, be much better off with cb animals as opposed to the FR frogs. But in terms of true "thumbs" there are lots of great choices for someone with dart care experience. Intermedius is also a good choice, although they likely won't be as easy to breed as vents or imitators.
 
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