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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

I bought two small containers of Java Moss. If I want to propagate this moss could I place it in a bigger container with some water and than the moss will grow, or do I need to do more in order to expland the amount of moss?

Thanks in advance

Ray
 

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IME, If you use that method and you want to plant the moss in the vivarium later, it will need to be kept very wet or all the moss will die in no time.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have those propagate containers and thought to fill it with 2 or 3 cm of water and place a grow light above it. Do you think that will do the job?
 

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Yes your method will work.

However

The trick is to let the moss grow on dry substrate like a piece of corck, wood or spaghnum for example and get a high humidity around the moss.

When put in water or with direct contact with water, the moss will ofc grow best BUT when it is placed later in a vivarium (what should be a lot dryer for the frogs), a lot of the moss will die since it is used to thrive in a more wet environment. So you have to 're'propage the moss again in the vivarium..
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ahhh clear hmmm placed it in a container with water but maybe will change what im doing. Maybe I experiment 50/50 to see what will happen. For the sake of fun
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok well for the sake of fun I will see what happens. I have done the following:

1: This is how I received the Java Moss and some of it I leave as it is for now, just spray it with rainwater
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2: Place it in a container of water, but as Tijl said this probably wont survive for 100% in the viv as it will adjust to the water instead of high humidity place outside the water
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3: I placed pebles in a growing container with water so it has high humidity but wont be under water. Therefore I think it will get used to live above water levels. I place a growing light and heating mat above and below the growing container. When I see it gets a bit dry I can spray it with rainwater anytime.
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So lets see what happens :)
 

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Good thinking! :)
 
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Discussion Starter #8
we need to experiement a little thats what it makes fun. As long no animals are hurted ofcourse
 

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That's how you wind up with 25+ tanks one day 🤣
 
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Java moss is probably one of if not straight up THE most indestructible aquatic plant. That said, your chances of success will be greatly enhanced if you provide some form of nutrients for the moss to eat. Your moss in water may or may not do fine depending on what your water is like. Some tap water contains nitrates and will give the plant what it needs, others.. not so much. I haven't done tests on rain water so I don't know about that. Regarding the one in stones... not so sure it will do well. Unless the water its coming in contact with has nutrients certainly the rocks are not going to be providing much of anything for it. If you put it on some wood in the same setup it should do better.
 

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Speaking as someone who has Java Moss, Christmas Moss, Taiwan Moss, and Flame Moss out their ears I can tell you this stuff will thrive in just about any damp condition that has enough light and nutrients. I currently have a few tubs (which were purchased from a livestock feed store) full of this and others with various mosses. One key thing is that you want to make sure if there is water, that it doesn't get overly stagnant. My one tub that is in my fishroom is literally where I chuck pounds and pounds of the stuff that I pull out of my breeder aquariums.

If you're looking for Moss spread to be fast, you're going to have to be sure it gets constant nutrients and light. The easiest way to do that is just to setup a small aquarium. Doesn't have to be big, 2.5-5 gallons will be more than enough space for you to be pulling clumps of this stuff out every month. You don't have to go out of your way and get fish, but something like snails and shrimp will provide a ton of waste that will be a great source for the moss. I don't feed my shrimp breeder tanks too much food and again, I'm pulling this stuff out by the fist load regularly. My only concern about keeping a container with water and moss is that algae can easily build up and take over the moss. That's why I recommend keeping something like shrimp and snails with it to basically maintain the condition of the moss.

When it comes to this stuff growing, keep in mind the more light you provide, the tighter the fronds will be, the less the more leggy/stringy the structure will be. When it's not submersed but grown emersed (like what you see in most Vivariums) the structure can and most likely will change shape. If you grow out stringy moss in an aquarium, don't plan on it looking that way once it's out and growing emersed.

Note of caution with this stuff. Once you add it to any aquarium or vivarium DON'T and I'll say it again, DON'T expect to ever get rid of the stuff. You will be fighting a battle that you will not win unless you completely remove everything in where it's growing and allow the enclosure to dry out 100%. Once it's basically in an environment it likes, it's impossible to get rid of it. The smallest piece will turn into a baseball sized clump in no time, when submersed. Since moss is epiphytic, it will solidly attach to a surface once established and without freezing or burning it off, you can't get it gone. That said about freezing, I actually have some outside in various fish tubs that I don't bring in over the winter. If the moss is kept hydrated and doesn't get frozen in a block of ice, it will happily survive and come back in the fall. The only times I've ever had this stuff die in the cold was when I shipped a bunch to someone and the actual moss was encrusted with ice due to USPS losing it in transit for a week during the winter.

TLDR:
Keep the moss in a well lighted enclosure that contains moving water (either by a water pump or an air pump with an airstone.) If kept in an aquarium environment to propagate, house invertebrates with it that don't require a lot of food as the inverts and left over food will be the NPK source of nutrients.
 
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