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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im sure you guys know by now I have two auratus and the one is extremely bigger in the belly then the other one. Does anyone have pictures of pregnant frogs or give me a better way to tell if mine may be pregnant.

thanks
 

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pregnant frog

If you had a picture it would be helpful to determine, frogs may be egg laden but not pregnant. I have had female Tincs and Azureus that look like golf balls with legs that laid eggs on a regulaer basis, I have also had impacted frogs that were bloated most of which eventually died. If you have a fat frog that is active, eating and acting "normally" it is probably female that is ready to lay. If your frog is not moving (unless proded) and squatting something is wrong.
More info is needed to help.
Mark
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I dont know what im doing. If some one could copy and paste it to go to the website it is on and maybe help me or give me an idea.

thanks
 

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Just a note... only mammals can become pregnant. The correct term for egg laying animals (including the two species of egg laying mammals) is 'gravid'.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ok then it maybe gravid. Is there any info someone could give me based on the pictures jbeetle posted for me
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well my frog died yesterday. I went to feed them and noticed the one laying there it was still fat.
 

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You might want to send a stool sample to Dr. Frye, he may be able to figure out just what it was that killed it.
 

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Frogs that bloat and then die usually are impacted with eggs or an obstruction, I have also seen this happen on rare occasions after feeding pinhead or 1 week old crickets. This seems to be a rare malady so the chances of it happening to one of your frogs again should be pretty slim.
Mark
 

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If you dust your crickets and fruit flies to much the frogs become fat because they are constipated. I have had this happen 2 times in the past with my frogs 1 leuc and 1 auratus. I was using herptavite and reptocal. I now use dendrocare and have had no problems and thats 2 years now. Also could be to much vitamin A. I would suggest you get dendrocare.
1.2.1 almirante
1.1 azureus
1.1 cobalt tincs
0.0.4 intermeduis
 

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Twny4svn said:
If you dust your crickets and fruit flies to much the frogs become fat because they are constipated. I have had this happen 2 times in the past with my frogs 1 leuc and 1 auratus. I was using herptavite and reptocal. I now use dendrocare and have had no problems and thats 2 years now. Also could be to much vitamin A. I would suggest you get dendrocare.
1.2.1 almirante
1.1 azureus
1.1 cobalt tincs
0.0.4 intermeduis
Interesting... My Herptivite says "HERPTIVITE is the FIRST reptile vitamin without Vitamin A. Instead, we use Beta Carotene which is an anti-oxidant that is converted into Vitamin A in a regulated way, so there is no threat of Vitamin A toxicity." I'm a little confused though, because I thought Vitamin A had more to do with kidney failure versus constipation. I dust with Herptivite and Repcal on alternating days and have steady bowel movements from my frogs. I think the combo I am using is pretty common among lots of dart froggers including respected breeders, so I wouldn't put all my eggs in one basket about this being the solution to this particular problem. The other thing that I think about is what else the frogs ingest when they are feeding. Every once in a while my frogs get a small amount of dirt when they eat a fly. It hasn't been a problem for me, but I guess that it is possible that your frog could have gotten something else into its system other than insects and vitamins that it couldn't break down. People have mentioned stryofoam from regular potting dirt being suspect.
 

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Well as I stated, the last time I used herptavite and reptocal was over 2 years ago so they may have removed the vit A since then and are now using Beta Carotene because it will not harm herps and can easily be processed into vit a when needed by the animal. I was only suggesting that this could be a possible solution in preventing this problem in the future. Sorry for any confusion just trying to help. This link shows the ingredients of dendrocare. http://dendrobatesworld.com/e-vitaminen.htm
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
See I dont think dusting was a problem Cause I hadnt dusted them the whole time Ive had them. Cause the products Ive seen mentioned I cant find in my area Except the calcuim dust the brand with An anole on it. I cant find any products made for dart frogs. I have seen vitamins for tree frogs. would the tree frog one help.
 

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Shinoff,

Just to clarify, have you not supplemented vitamins at all? How long have you had these guys? If so this may be your problem, especially if you haven't been using a calcium supplement:
Amphibians afflicted with MBD appear weak, and may be suffering from pathological fractures about the spine and other bones, loss of bone density, splayed limbs, scoliosis, tetany (different than in cows), bloating (gastrointestinal gas), hydrops, subcutaneous edema, gastric or cloacal propolase, or a combination of these conditions. Mandibular deformities, abnormal posture, reluctance to move, splayed limbs, and scoliosis are some external symptoms that could be attributed to MBD.

Most arthropods fed to captive amphibians, namely crickets, possess an inverse calcium-to-phosphorous ratio, making them a calcium-deficient food source for amphibians. Those that are fed a diet of only crickets are at high risk of developing MBD. The calcium-deficiency of crickets can be counteracted by "gut-loading" the crickets 48 hours prior to feeding to amphibians. Gut loading means feeding crickets meals high in nutrients, namely calcium, prior to feeding the crickets to other organisms. When an amphibian eats a cricket it will absorb any nutrients within the cricket, so healthy crickets lead to healthier amphibians, and vice versa. Cricket diets can be purchased at most pet stores that sell crickets, or online from any reptile/amphibian supply company, and should be around 5%-8% calcium to maintain a positive calcium-to-phosphorous balance. A major disadvantage to gut-loading with high calcium foods is that the crickets usually cannot survive more than 48 hours on such a diet, and smaller insects, such as fruit flies and flour beetles cannot survive more than a few hours. Also, it has been shown that amphibians fed a diet of properly gut-loaded crickets still develop calcium imbalances, implying that there are other major factors affecting calcium absorption and utilization.
http://www.livingunderworld.org/amphibi ... 0001.shtml

Dropsy:
Possibly caused by bacteria, but much more likely a metabolism disorder - resulting from poor climactic maintenance or improper diet. Dropsy appears as bloating and soft dermal abnormalities around the abdominal region. The treatments sound really risky, involving puncturing the wounds if they aren't near the eye region. Even the one book I was able to find that describes this illness strongly recommends seeing a specialist for treatment.
http://allaboutfrogs.org/info/doctor/sick.html

If it is the case that you haven't been supplementing, I strongly recommend that you order some supplements ASAP.

Marcos
 

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Twny4svn said:
Well as I stated, the last time I used herptavite and reptocal was over 2 years ago so they may have removed the vit A since then and are now using Beta Carotene because it will not harm herps and can easily be processed into vit a when needed by the animal. I was only suggesting that this could be a possible solution in preventing this problem in the future. Sorry for any confusion just trying to help. This link shows the ingredients of dendrocare. http://dendrobatesworld.com/e-vitaminen.htm
You are wrong. I used Herptivite back when it first came out in 1998 on my leopard geckos, and even then it had beta carotene instead of vitamin A.

shinoff said:
See I dont think dusting was a problem Cause I hadnt dusted them the whole time Ive had them. Cause the products Ive seen mentioned I cant find in my area Except the calcuim dust the brand with An anole on it. I cant find any products made for dart frogs. I have seen vitamins for tree frogs. would the tree frog one help.
If you haven't dusted their food the whole time, that's your problem. You have to use vitamin dust. There's no way around it. Some people think that gut loading has the same effect, but that's not been proven. Your tag says that you are in Erie PA, and Petsmart's store locator tells me that there's a Petsmart right in your city:

Erie Petsmart
7451 Peach Street
Erie, PA 16509-4712

You can buy RepCal and Herptivite there. It's not as cheap as you can get it online or at shows, but I wouldn't wait. Your other frogs are in severe danger of going the same way.
 
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