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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So unfortunately my Vriesea fell over in the tank this morning but fortunately none of my frogs ('Fine Spot' Dendrobates Leucomelas') were harmed. I've had the plant for four months now and in that time period it's failed to root properly, most likely because it was initially mounted with superglue and was quite a botch job as the plant's stem was particularly difficult to work with. C'est la vie. I'm not too hung up on it personally as my frogs are safe and I didn't like the look too much, but I'm sure my frogs are (forgive my anthropomorphizing here, I'm just thinking about the good of the frog). The plant offered plenty of places to hide and opened many new pathways for them to get from one place to another. It made good use of negative space. Since this is the second time this has happened (the first time was before I'd put any frogs in), I'm probably going to give up on it and instead look for alternatives. I believe I have four options:
  1. Leave things as is: While empty, I don't exactly mind the look of and it makes areas within the tank significantly easier to access for maintenance etc and misting. Granted this significantly reduces the usable area within the tank.
  2. Find a different plant: Please help suggest a plant with a similar utility level to a vriesea
  3. Get some more hardscape: Might be a bit difficult as there's not much space to work with, but I'll see what can be done.
  4. Work with another vriesea
Thank you for your input.

The plant took up space where the hardscape forms a triangle. Its stem was where the clump of sphagnum is currently. The moss was put there to hide the botch job where the stem was attached using superglue. Suggestions for how to cover it up/ remove it are greatly appreciated.

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Frog looking rather confused as to where the vriesea went.

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So unfortunately my Vriesea fell over in the tank this morning but fortunately none of my frogs ('Fine Spot' Dendrobates Leucomelas') were harmed. I've had the plant for four months now and in that time period it's failed to root properly, most likely because it was initially mounted with superglue and was quite a botch job as the plant's stem was particularly difficult to work with. C'est la vie. I'm not too hung up on it personally as my frogs are safe and I didn't like the look too much, but I'm sure my frogs are (forgive my anthropomorphizing here, I'm just thinking about the good of the frog). The plant offered plenty of places to hide and opened many new pathways for them to get from one place to another. It made good use of negative space. Since this is the second time this has happened (the first time was before I'd put any frogs in), I'm probably going to give up on it and instead look for alternatives. I believe I have four options:
  1. Leave things as is: While empty, I don't exactly mind the look of and it makes areas within the tank significantly easier to access for maintenance etc and misting. Granted this significantly reduces the usable area within the tank.
  2. Find a different plant: Please help suggest a plant with a similar utility level to a vriesea
  3. Get some more hardscape: Might be a bit difficult as there's not much space to work with, but I'll see what can be done.
  4. Work with another vriesea
Thank you for your input.

The plant took up space where the hardscape forms a triangle. Its stem was where the clump of sphagnum is currently. The moss was put there to hide the botch job where the stem was attached using superglue. Suggestions for how to cover it up/ remove it are greatly appreciated.

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Frog looking rather confused as to where the vriesea went.

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View attachment 308108
I would probably get a lighter of the same species or try to secure it better
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Was the bloom assisting the frogs in using the vertical space?
It was. My biggest issue with vriesea is how difficult they are to mount. The stem will have to be a certain shape to facilitate it (so getting it to be the right shape will be like playing the lottery) and it can't be too heavy which limits its size. But if the plant's too small (lighter) then it'll be useless for the frog.

The current stem is basically a U shaped stem which makes it impossible to attach to a horizontal surface without glue (which doesn't seem to be working).

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I'm no expert on bromiliads, but I've seen a lot of tall/narrow varieties that may work similarly without the bloom being needed to achieve the height for access to the top of the viv while still not using too much horizontal space.
 

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It was. My biggest issue with vriesea is how difficult they are to mount. The stem will have to be a certain shape to facilitate it (so getting it to be the right shape will be like playing the lottery) and it can't be too heavy which limits its size. But if the plant's too small (lighter) then it'll be useless for the frog.

The current stem is basically a U shaped stem which makes it impossible to attach to a horizontal surface without glue (which doesn't seem to be working).

View attachment 308132
Use wire or fishing line
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ended up removing like ten leaves to reduce the weight and tried fishing line. So far so good. Hopefully it stays that way because I can't tie a knot to save my life.
 

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I would not plant a blooming bromeliad. That mother plant is at the end of it's life cycle. It may pup. But, you have no control of what direction it is going to send out the new growth. You plant for the plant to grow. Not for what it is in it's current state.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I would not plant a blooming bromeliad.
I don't believe the plant is currently blooming? But I can see where you're coming from. I was on autopilot when I'd responded to PersephonesChild's statement and I believe they're referring to the plant when they say "bloom" due to how they look like flowers?
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I don't believe the plant is currently blooming? But I can see where you're coming from. I was on autopilot when I'd responded to PersephonesChild's statement and I believe they're referring to the plant when they say "bloom" due to how they look like flowers?
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I'm not sure if you knew about this when buying your plants but the Vriesea is going to be too big for that tank so fast!
Also the Sintenisii and the el coca also get huge, which would me personaly choose an entire different range of Marcgravia and bromeliads for this size of enclosure.
I fear you'll be chopping up most these plants in 3-6 months.

The M.umbellata and the Solanum Uleanum should be fine though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Vriesea is going to be too big for that tank so fast!
Yeah, the Vriesea is the one that I'm most worried about. Do you have any recommendations for a bromeliad that'll stay about eight inches tall?

Also the Sintenisii
This is news to me though, I'd thought that while their leaves do get comparatively round and fat, I wasn't aware that they'd get "big" in the sense that they'll end up taking space. Did you mean M. Azreal by any chance?

I fear you'll be chopping up most these plants in 3-6 months.
Yeah, I also knew what I was getting into with the El Coca and I don't mind chopping some up as I like the way they look, the shade they'll end up providing, and there's always demand for them given their rarity. Granted to El Coca will actually have to root and really take off first for that to be a concern. Currently it's doing nothing other than sending out new roots.
 

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In frog tanks plants often don't get as much light as they normally do. That makes them grow taller and leggy. Also, tank conditions cause them to grow a lot faster then house plants often grow. I never plan to cut plants back and still end up having to even with smaller slow growing plants.
 

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In frog tanks plants often don't get as much light as they normally do. That makes them grow taller and leggy. Also, tank conditions cause them to grow a lot faster then house plants often grow. I never plan to cut plants back and still end up having to even with smaller slow growing plants.
Stretching plants is a different topic. Tbh, most available terrarium/vivarium lights nowadays are more than excellent for plant growth. I don't think this is the case here based on the color and look of the plants.

The species of plants chosen hete are simply large plants once they reach 'adult' 😅


@anon : yes, the Sintenisii. They get realy big. M.Azrael also get fairly large I believe, but it's one of the few hobby available margravia I have no experience with yet.

There a quite a bunch of smaller Vriesea (or ither bromeliad) One of my favorites Mid sized is a Vriesea Erythrodactylon. Neoregelia 'chiquita linda' is my number one when it comes to more colorful bromeliads.

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
yes, the Sintenisii.
That's interesting. Do you happen to have any images of a mature Sintenisii on hand? All of the images of the plant that I could find online show it growing leaves no larger than half an index finger.
One of my favorites Mid sized is a Vriesea Erythrodactylon.
Thanks for your suggestion. I'll see if I can get my hands on one. Fortunately it doesn't seem to have any thorns.
 

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@Anon123 : To give you an idea, I did some trimming in my tanks last week. These were some of the macragvia. The last photo is a medium sized part of one of the Sintenisii that had around 4 months of growth.




This one had his side growth already trimmed :



And the cutting from it :

 

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That's interesting. Do you happen to have any images of a mature Sintenisii on hand? All of the images of the plant that I could find online show it growing leaves no larger than half an index finger.

Thanks for your suggestion. I'll see if I can get my hands on one. Fortunately it doesn't seem to have any thorns.
No, I'm not aware of any vriesea having torns. But why would that mather if I may ask?

 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
No, I'm not aware of any vriesea having torns. But why would that mather if I may ask?
It's for a tank with Leucs and I'd rather err on the side of caution. I'll take a zero percent chance of my frogs impaling themselves over a miniscule, but non-zero chance of it happening any day. And the vriesea's main purpose in my tank is to eat into negative space and provide shade with its unique structure rather than providing a secure place to deposit tadpoles. TO that end, thorns aren't necessary.
 

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It's for a tank with Leucs and I'd rather err on the side of caution. I'll take a zero percent chance of my frogs impaling themselves over a miniscule, but non-zero chance of it happening any day. And the vriesea's main purpose in my tank is to eat into negative space and provide shade with its unique structure rather than providing a secure place to deposit tadpoles. TO that end, thorns aren't necessary.
I never heard of a frog getting impaled by a bromeliad torn. In all the years I keep frogs, non of mine ever did and I have plenty 'thorned' bromeliads in my enclosures.

As shown on the photo, most frog move very easely on them. 😄 If you look at my bull toe in the back of the photo, he is standing on one. But I you still don't feel comfortable, there are hundreds of thornless option ofcourse!


One piece of advice : pull your leucomela's eggs!

They don't raise tadpoles. So each tadpole that would end up in a small water feature in the enclosure won't survive or either never receive a good foodscoure to be raised healthy..
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I never heard of a frog getting impaled by a bromeliad torn. In all the years I keep frogs, non of mine ever did and I have plenty 'thorned' bromeliads in my enclosures.
There are some old anecdotes of it happening: Bromeliad has jagged edges..
But of course it's a very minor concern else you'd hear about it being a problem constantly (which you don't).
There's also the issue of injuring yourself as well on the spikes which I'd like to avoid.
And yeah, I'm sure I can be satisfied with a thorn-free vriesea. The V. Erythrodactylon looks nice and simple.

Looking at your images of M. Sintenisii, when you said it gets "big," did you mean it in the sense that the plant will grow everywhere like a weed as opposed to the plant's leaf growing super big as in the case of M. El Coca (which I've seen do both)?
 

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Looking at your images of M. Sintenisii, when you said it gets "big," did you mean it in the sense that the plant will grow everywhere like a weed as opposed to the plant's leaf growing super big as in the case of M. El Coca (which I've seen do both)?
Both. But in your case I think the lare leaves are the issue. The 'vigerous' groth can be easely controled but trimming.
 
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