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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve decided to quarantine my plants for 3.5 weeks, considering I’m getting all of them from three separate places.
So I’m a bit unclear on some things, any tips or advice is greatly appreciated!
plants I’m using: oak leaf leaf creeping fig, golden pothos, two neoregelias bromeliads, pilea depressa, and pilea moon valley.
1. the bromeliads are from bromeliad.com which does treat with pesticides, i figured as long as I waited three weeks of plant quarantine and five weeks of the vivarium cycling, it be safe to use for my inhabitant by then?
2. I’m using a 10x20inch humidity dome that’s about 9 inches tall to quarantine the plants. My lighting is a Jungle Dawn 18” 22W, can I place this directly on top of the dome or would this be too much light? I also have a NanoTech T5 Reflector that came with the humidity dome but since it’s for seedlings would it still work for 3inch plants?
3. Since I’m quarantining is it fine to skip the bleach step? I was planning to bare root, rinse well and soak each plant for 10-15 minutes in dechlorinated lukewarm water(before and after the quarantine). If bleaching is neccessary, would any of these plants be too sensitive/need a weaker dip instead of a diluted soak?
4. How should I go about quarantining the bromeliads since they’re epiphytes and don’t need soil?
5. My original tank substrate will be Neherp V2, however I only have enough for the original tank. I got a tropical substrate mix from divideandculture to quarantine the plants in, since it’s pretty much the same as the Neherp V2 and only missing one ingredient (the calcinated clay). Will this be okay?
6. I’m a bit scared of mold becoming a problem in the quarantine tank, can it take over and kill plants? What can I do to prevent it?
7. I’ve heard a few stories of plants not making it through the quarantine period, what are the usual causes of this so I can avoid them? This will be my first time with plants ever, so I’m trying to be as prepared as possible.
Thanks again!
 

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I’ve decided to quarantine my plants for 3.5 weeks, considering I’m getting all of them from three separate places.
So I’m a bit unclear on some things, any tips or advice is greatly appreciated!
plants I’m using: oak leaf leaf creeping fig, golden pothos, two neoregelias bromeliads, pilea depressa, and pilea moon valley.
1. the bromeliads are from bromeliad.com which does treat with pesticides, i figured as long as I waited three weeks of plant quarantine and five weeks of the vivarium cycling, it be safe to use for my inhabitant by then?
2. I’m using a 10x20inch humidity dome that’s about 9 inches tall to quarantine the plants. My lighting is a Jungle Dawn 18” 22W, can I place this directly on top of the dome or would this be too much light? I also have a NanoTech T5 Reflector that came with the humidity dome but since it’s for seedlings would it still work for 3inch plants?
3. Since I’m quarantining is it fine to skip the bleach step? I was planning to bare root, rinse well and soak each plant for 10-15 minutes in dechlorinated lukewarm water(before and after the quarantine). If bleaching is neccessary, would any of these plants be too sensitive/need a weaker dip instead of a diluted soak?
4. How should I go about quarantining the bromeliads since they’re epiphytes and don’t need soil?
5. My original tank substrate will be Neherp V2, however I only have enough for the original tank. I got a tropical substrate mix from divideandculture to quarantine the plants in, since it’s pretty much the same as the Neherp V2 and only missing one ingredient (the calcinated clay). Will this be okay?
6. I’m a bit scared of mold becoming a problem in the quarantine tank, can it take over and kill plants? What can I do to prevent it?
7. I’ve heard a few stories of plants not making it through the quarantine period, what are the usual causes of this so I can avoid them? This will be my first time with plants ever, so I’m trying to be as prepared as possible.
Thanks again!
I'll take a stab at some of your questions based off of my experience:

1. I have purchased plants from big box stores and nurseries in the past. I have no doubt that many of them have used pesticides and foliar sprays that leave behind residues. I have put these into my tanks in the past (not anymore without an extended observation period of three to four weeks) immediately after a very thorough rinsing and scrubbing. Is this a guarantee, no, but has not come back to haunt me personally.
2. Not sure on your light as I have never used it. The reflector should be fine to use though.
3. Bleaching is advised.
4. I put my bromeliads into humidomes after thoroughly cleaning. I elevate a piece of egg crate used for false bottoms with pvc couplers and stick the stolens through the holes. Does a nice job of propping them upright and the humidity within the domes does a good job of promoting root development.
5. Yes should be. I usually set new plants up on 100% sphagnum though which is cheaper. It is great at getting clippings to root, keeps moisture well, and as a bonus (to me at least, some people find it invasive) often returns to life.
6. Mold can be a problem in your quarantine tank. Anywhere for that matter. Newly arrived plants can drop leaves and mold over. This is natural. After it is obvious that a leaf is done for I chop it (after a spritz of Isopropyl) to prevent mold and further infection. Beyond that, keep your humidomes humid, not wet. If you have excessive condensation on your domes, you have too much moisture and you need to vent it (all of mine have different types of adjustable vents on the top).
7. I've had plants die in quarantine. It happens. Most of the time it is due to shipping stress and they die within days, or maybe a little over a weak. DON'T GIVE UP ON A PLANT THOUGH. I've had them come back from dead a few times. I've lost them other ways though, the most common being that the new plants didn't acclimate to my lights. Mine are fairly intense. When acclimating plants, and quarantining, I'd suggest going less bright while they are establishing themselves. After they establish they can handle and acclimate to more light.

Nothing to it but to do it. Experience is what you need and in no time you will be able to read your plants and their needs just on a visual inspection. Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'll take a stab at some of your questions based off of my experience:

1. I have purchased plants from big box stores and nurseries in the past. I have no doubt that many of them have used pesticides and foliar sprays that leave behind residues. I have put these into my tanks in the past (not anymore without an extended observation period of three to four weeks) immediately after a very thorough rinsing and scrubbing. Is this a guarantee, no, but has not come back to haunt me personally.
2. Not sure on your light as I have never used it. The reflector should be fine to use though.
3. Bleaching is advised.
4. I put my bromeliads into humidomes after thoroughly cleaning. I elevate a piece of egg crate used for false bottoms with pvc couplers and stick the stolens through the holes. Does a nice job of propping them upright and the humidity within the domes does a good job of promoting root development.
5. Yes should be. I usually set new plants up on 100% sphagnum though which is cheaper. It is great at getting clippings to root, keeps moisture well, and as a bonus (to me at least, some people find it invasive) often returns to life.
6. Mold can be a problem in your quarantine tank. Anywhere for that matter. Newly arrived plants can drop leaves and mold over. This is natural. After it is obvious that a leaf is done for I chop it (after a spritz of Isopropyl) to prevent mold and further infection. Beyond that, keep your humidomes humid, not wet. If you have excessive condensation on your domes, you have too much moisture and you need to vent it (all of mine have different types of adjustable vents on the top).
7. I've had plants die in quarantine. It happens. Most of the time it is due to shipping stress and they die within days, or maybe a little over a weak. DON'T GIVE UP ON A PLANT THOUGH. I've had them come back from dead a few times. I've lost them other ways though, the most common being that the new plants didn't acclimate to my lights. Mine are fairly intense. When acclimating plants, and quarantining, I'd suggest going less bright while they are establishing themselves. After they establish they can handle and acclimate to more light.

Nothing to it but to do it. Experience is what you need and in no time you will be able to read your plants and their needs just on a visual inspection. Good luck
Thanks so much, I really appreciate the detailed response! I think I’ll go with the reflector for the light, and bleaching as well. That method sounds great for the bromeliads, so you don’t use any moss for them in quarantine? Just fresh water in the cups and light will be enough for them? I do have some 100% sphagnum moss but would that only work for just clippings? I’m getting all 3-4inch plants. Would I have to change the moss out before the month is over? I do have vents on the dome top, so I’ll keep in mind of the humid, not wet thing. Thanks again for all your help!
 

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If plants appear healthy and you are not introducing them to a collection worth 10's of thousands of dollars is quadrating necessary? The risk that you will infect other plants is extremely low. Just plant the vivarium.
 

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Thanks so much, I really appreciate the detailed response! I think I’ll go with the reflector for the light, and bleaching as well. That method sounds great for the bromeliads, so you don’t use any moss for them in quarantine? Just fresh water in the cups and light will be enough for them? I do have some 100% sphagnum moss but would that only work for just clippings? I’m getting all 3-4inch plants. Would I have to change the moss out before the month is over? I do have vents on the dome top, so I’ll keep in mind of the humid, not wet thing. Thanks again for all your help!
No moss for the bromeliads in quarantine. No cups of water either. Just poke the stolon through the eggcrate. No medium at all. Pour a little water into their cups and spray a little water in the humidome tray. The water in the humidome tray should be "beaded up" not with standing water. After a few days to a week you should should start to see fuzzy roots developing at the base of the bromeliad where it meets the stolon. That's all you need for the bromeliads.

I use 100% Long Fiber Sphagnum Moss, that is all (there are some twigs and stuff that come in the sphagnum moss, I try and pick them out, but I am not anal about it). Some LFS brands are better in that the length of fibers are longer and comes with less "junk", but they are a little harder to come by right now. I've been using the cheap stuff from the big box stores lately with good success.

You shouldn't have to change the moss out throughout your quarantine period.

Good luck.
 

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If plants appear healthy and you are not introducing them to a collection worth 10's of thousands of dollars is quadrating necessary? The risk that you will infect other plants is extremely low. Just plant the vivarium.
This is probably a matter of who you ask. At the very least I suggest everyone process their plants with a good rinse/scrubbing and bleach dip. My main concern with plants from nurseries/big box stores is more to do with pesticides and residual foliar sprays. These plants are healthy and look healthy, but I wouldn't even think about putting them into a tank until they were prepared.

I've never had any plant diseases or fungal outbreaks that were contagious (can't think of any that I've heard of amongst vivarium owners either). However, I have had pests make their way into tanks and that is why the additional observation period is a good idea. It's really not a big deal. All it requires is a 10$ humidome (handy to have anyways if you ever want to save clippings from one of your tanks). Doesn't even require a dedicated light. You could put the humidome right next to a window with diffused light.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
No moss for the bromeliads in quarantine. No cups of water either. Just poke the stolon through the eggcrate. No medium at all. Pour a little water into their cups and spray a little water in the humidome tray. The water in the humidome tray should be "beaded up" not with standing water. After a few days to a week you should should start to see fuzzy roots developing at the base of the bromeliad where it meets the stolon. That's all you need for the bromeliads.

I use 100% Long Fiber Sphagnum Moss, that is all (there are some twigs and stuff that come in the sphagnum moss, I try and pick them out, but I am not anal about it). Some LFS brands are better in that the length of fibers are longer and comes with less "junk", but they are a little harder to come by right now. I've been using the cheap stuff from the big box stores lately with good success.

You shouldn't have to change the moss out throughout your quarantine period.

Good luck.
Thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If plants appear healthy and you are not introducing them to a collection worth 10's of thousands of dollars is quadrating necessary? The risk that you will infect other plants is extremely low. Just plant the vivarium.
I just want to be extra safe, because I am getting them from a few separate places so the risk of pests might be a little higher. I’d rather not have anything slip through the washing process and infest the permanent cork bark mosaic background.
 
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