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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello I've had my paludarium set up for almost a year. It's in a 30 gallon breeder and I've been trying to think of some type of frog to put in there and I don't know what I can put in there. Any suggestions would be nice, I'll post a picture of it later when I get home
 

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Hi,
It looks like there is not much land area in your tank so I would recommend an aquatic frog of some type.
You didn't mention what type of equipment you have (IE filter, heater, light setup, etc) Depending on the parameters inside the tank, how stable the are, and any experience you have had with keeping amphibians, will determine what you can keep.
I would recommend something along the lines of Fire-belly Newts, African Dwarf/Clawed Frogs, or Fire-belly Toads. All of these should be great introductory amphibians to get you started, but make sure once you decide on something to research into its particular care.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I was wanting to silicon a small piece of flat cork bark in the bend but I didn't know if the cork bark is fish safe. for lighting I have a fluval led reef light.( it grows my aquatic plants like crazy and its doing a nice job growing the moss) I have a heater but I haven't had to use it for a while do to it being so hot lately but it normally stays around 77-80 F. if I need to I can dial that in smaller range if need be. I don't really want to do fire-belly toads or dwarf frogs. I have a cascade 170 filter in the water and I also do a water change once a week. I haven't really kept amphibians before but I have a reef tank(7+ years old) and its doing well so I thought I would try this and I do lots of research on anything before I get it haha. would I be able to do any type of tree frogs and is there any other type of frog I could do besides those?
 

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Cork bark should be fish safe as it is frequently used in vivs/ paludariums that have both fish and terrestrial amphibians.
Sounds like that equipment should work fine for many types of frogs. And if you’re able to keep a stable reef thriving than keeping frogs should be pretty similar.
I wouldn’t recommend a tree frog for this particular tank, as it looks like your tank is quite shallow, especially when a third of it is underwater. And I also can’t recommend any type of dart frog since there seems to be so little land area. I would stick with aquatic/ semi-aquatic frogs. I still think some Fire Bellies would be best suited to that tank, plus they have some great personality and are more active than many tree frogs. Perhaps others here have had different experience and can recommend something else that would do well with that much water area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I still want to do some kind of frog but if I were to do a newt or salamander what types would be good for my setup and thanks for the help. I have also just recently been looking at thinking of putting in some bladderwort and maybe a pitcher plant but I don't know how the pitcher plant would be in my setup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I still want to do some kind of frog but if I were to do a newt or salamander what types would be good for my setup and thanks for the help. I have also just recently been looking at thinking of putting in some bladderwort and maybe a pitcher plant but I don't know how the pitcher plant would be in my setup.
 

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If you can find any, some spotted floating frogs (Occidozyga lima) would do great. They spend virtually all of their time floating on the surface of the water, or in floating vegetation. They're not that easy to come by though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
can anyone tell me of a good salamander or new that would be ok with fish or if a reed frog would be ok?
 

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Newts and salamanders don't really like fish in the water. Small cool water species like White Cloud minnows work okay, as long as their population density is kept low. But if you go with caudates, I would recommend freshwater shrimp.

I think in the wild most caudates avoid fish inhabited water bodies, as the fish are formidable predators to larvae and adults alike. I'm sure newts can sense the presence of fish in the water by picking up on hormones or something like that.

I keep Cynops ensicauda popei, and they will exhibit both terrestrial and aquatic behaviors, although if they're really comfortable they'll be almost exclusively aquatic. They can also tolerate room temps with ease. The only problem is that with the salamander shipping ban you can't buy adults or larvae, only eggs from hobbyists in another state.
 
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