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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Pacific Tree Frog lives on the west coast of North America, from Baja California to Alaska, where it was introduced in the 60's. I've caught these all my life, but now after I got into the idea of keeping frogs as a hobby, I set up a permanent vivarium for them. These guys have really cool patterns in natural green/brown colors. Here's a top-down shot of the viv (I'm in the process of rinsing everything)...



I'm going to put two pieces of driftwood in there. One if for climbing and it will be reaching up to the top of the viv. The other is for hiding and it will provide a dark, damp place for the frogs to chill. The landscape is really cool because I made it where there is an area that the frogs can sit on but it is submerged under a tiny bit of water. I'm thinking of putting some grasses or something in there for them to sit in.

Currently the tadpoles are in a grow-out tank. Most are around 1cm or less. One is about 2cm and there are three that are 3cm-4cm, which have their back legs. The oldest one is expected to get it's front legs within a few days.

Babies chillin' with their peeps...



Biggest one and a small one side-by-side...



And here's what they'll look like when full-grown...



I'll post more pictures as the viv gets near finished and the tads develop more.

PS: I'm going to patch the tank with silicone and sphagnum where needed soon... :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I patched most of the Great Stuff that was sticking through and rinsed out all the excess peat. I took a small shovel and went out on my lawn to get some weeds. I found some vines with orange flowers, some succulent-type plants with white flowers, and a plant with yellow flowers. I also discovered that my lawn has been farming green sphagnum for the last 15 years. I got a bunch and rinsed the dirt off of it. They'll make a nice little floor cover. I also have some brown sphagnum with no dirt on it that I can drape over the drift wood and put in the areas with less than 1cm of water. I have PLENTY more weeds in my yard if I need any lol. :p

Oh, and I'll go to my local home depot to get a bit of ivy to plant in the peat planted built into the back wall. :cool:

Pics...

(Sphagnum)


(Vine)


(Yellow flowers)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It's ready to go for the morphers, which I'll add in a few days. Here's some pictures. Please keep in mind that all of the plant life, except to ivy, was found in my yard. So yes, you could say I filled my viv with weeds. :eek:

Top-down shot


Ivy, moss and more


And my favorite area... The Chill Log. The Chill log features a cool, shaded area for moistening the skin and a soft, mossy deck for lounging and log diving. :D


There was no water in the viv while the photos were taken. I have some water plants for the frogs to hide in. The peat soaks up a bunch of water and it keeps the ground SOAKED. It moistens the green moss I have, and the holes in which I put the plants collect tiny puddles of water in the bottom of them which will keep the plants watered. :)

Will post pics when I get the tads in there! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The tadpoles can be pretty heavily cannibalistic...might want to watch your group.
Haven't had any problems with that in the last two weeks. I read online that these guys feed on organic matter. The water moss I put in there decayed into a pile of crap and all of the tads are down there having a feast.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Isn't it illegal to keep Pacific Green Tree Frogs without a license? I have heard that anyway.
I've read up on it.

"A current California Freshwater Sport Fishing License is needed by any resident or non-resident 16 years of age or older to take, or collect, reptiles and amphibians in California, except for rattlesnakes, which are not protected by law."

I have a current California Freshwater Sport Fishing License, which is the liscens required to take the Pacific Chorus Frog. The Pacific Chorus Frog is on the list of Amphibians you can take according to California state laws. I guess this project gives me a good reason to renew a $50 license every year! :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Except for rattlesnakes?!?:confused:
Yeah that kinda shocked me too! It's almost like they're encouraging people to attempt catching wild rattlers and keep them as pets. I've only seen one once in my life. The one I saw actually slithered right through my legs when I was in younger! :eek:
 

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Good luck with this project. Keep us updated on their progress.

Take care, Richard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Good luck with this project. Keep us updated on their progress.

Take care, Richard.
Thanks. Will do. :)

I'll get a morph container ready tomorrow and by then my largest tad should have his front legs. It'll have moist sphagnum on the dry part and the wet part will be just water. I'll put some of the decayed moss and a bit of moss from my yard in the water for them to eat if they're hungry. I'll post pictures when I get it set up. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Here's a picture of "the chill log" with the water under it so you can see what I'm talking about. It's extremely shallow water that the frogs can sit in. Definitely my favorite feature of the tank, and I made it on complete accident!



The oldest tad has three legs as of now... The other front leg should pop out soon. Here's a picture of the morph container from the side...



I just now put some sphagnum and some moss from my yard into the water in case the tads get hungry or something. :)

And here's an almost full viv shot. Well it's the nice part of the viv at least. :rolleyes:



My weed is beginning to flower! :D
There are two full blooms, two half blooms, and four or more unopened blooms.



I'll update when the first tad goes into the morph container.
 

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very cool tank. they were reclassified to pacific chorus frogs by the way, no longer a Hyla.

i think the reason they say you dont need the license for rattlesnakes is a lot of people hunt and eat them. they arent talking about keeping them as pets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Re: Pacific Chorus Frog Vivarium

very cool tank. they were reclassified to pacific chorus frogs by the way, no longer a Hyla.

i think the reason they say you dont need the license for rattlesnakes is a lot of people hunt and eat them. they arent talking about keeping them as pets.
I realized that they were called chorus frogs after I made this thread. If any admins read this, please change the title of this thread to Pacific Chorus Frog Vivarium, if you can please. :)

I guess that makes sense about the rattle snakes... but they should still say something about not attempting to catch them as pets.
 

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I've read up on it.

"A current California Freshwater Sport Fishing License is needed by any resident or non-resident 16 years of age or older to take, or collect, reptiles and amphibians in California, except for rattlesnakes, which are not protected by law."

I have a current California Freshwater Sport Fishing License, which is the liscens required to take the Pacific Chorus Frog. The Pacific Chorus Frog is on the list of Amphibians you can take according to California state laws. I guess this project gives me a good reason to renew a $50 license every year! :p
Aren't you limited to four.... ? Freshwater Sport Fishing Regulations - Species Regulations § 5.05


Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·

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Four is both the daily and possession limit..
c) Limit: The daily bag and possession limit for each of the amphibian species listed in subsection (a), above, is four except for bullfrogs, which have no daily bag or possession limit.

If you have other amphibians or reptiles in your collection that are not quarantined from the tadpoles, then you are putting them at risk by releasing any as there is a risk of novel pathogens. It is actually illegal for you to release them see
(e) Reptiles or amphibians which have been in captivity, including wild-caught and captively-bred individuals or offspring,shall not be released into the wild without the written approval of the department.
you are required to transfer them to another person or institution holding a scientific permit unless you get permission from the Department of FIsh and Game to release them. See the regulations here http://www.dfg.ca.gov/licensing/pdffiles/fg1502.pdf


 
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