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Go on caudata.org if you want more info. Not a lot of people keep them in captivity. There is a member on caudata.org that keeps them. You should pm or email him if you join caudata.org. This is what I know. They are like tiger salamanders but need a water area or big water bowl. You should feed them earth worms and the occasional waxworm/mealworm.
 

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Dicamptodon make excellent captives! I have kept several of them. They are vey easy to keep, will eat darn near anything, become very bold and will eat from your hand, and become impressively large. The pattern is also impressive on many individuals. I highly recommend these as captives if you can find them. I'll try to get some pics up of individuals that I used to keep
 

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here are pictures as promised

dicamptodon tenebrosus

1st individual



2nd individual



3rd individual




all 3 together


here is rather large dicamptodon ensatus, easily a foot long



2 ensatus found in the santa cruz mts


here are some other amazing salamanders found in california

plethodon elongatus


plethodon stormi



ensatina e, picta




ensatina e. xanthoptica



ensatina e. platensis



ensatina e. croceator



ensatina klauberi




salamanders make amazing captives and I urge anyone interested in them to give them a try. they can be bred in captivity and are very rewarding. I think you would be pleasantly surprised.

Josh
 

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I was under the impression that Dicamptodon required a chiller in captivity? I've heard the same about Ensatina (modified fridges for long term keeping/breeding)? Thanks! JVK
 

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I was under the impression that Dicamptodon required a chiller in captivity? I've heard the same about Ensatina (modified fridges for long term keeping/breeding)? Thanks! JVK
No that is not true. I lived in Arizona when I was heavily into keeping salamanders. I managed to successfully keep many species and even bred ensatina e. Croceator without ever using a fridge or chiller. A friend of mine who also lives in Arizona successfully bred ensatina klauberi without a fridge or chiller. They are MUCH tougher than people think. You definitely don't want to expose them to temps any higher than about 75 as anything higher causes them great stress and temps 80 or higher can be lethal with the exception of klauberi and many in the Aneides genus. They can withstand temps of 80 and higher but I highly advise against it. Many eastern north American plethodons can also withstand higher temps but again, I don't advise it.

Josh
 

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No that is not true. I lived in Arizona when I was heavily into keeping salamanders. I managed to successfully keep many species and even bred ensatina e. Croceator without ever using a fridge or chiller. A friend of mine who also lives in Arizona successfully bred ensatina klauberi without a fridge or chiller. They are MUCH tougher than people think. You definitely don't want to expose them to temps any higher than about 75 as anything higher causes them great stress and temps 80 or higher can be lethal with the exception of klauberi and many in the Aneides genus. They can withstand temps of 80 and higher but I highly advise against it. Many eastern north American plethodons can also withstand higher temps but again, I don't advise it.

Josh
Hey Josh, I've been on many, many Ensatina hunts, and have never found a one, so thanks for the pics, really piques my childhood obsession with them. My obsession with caudates pretty much died with Oregons absurd rules against keeping them.

One of these years I WILL turn up a Taricha granulosa mazamae, as they are in my neck of the woods.As far as I know, they haven't been seen for awhile, so that would be a cool little "claim to fame" :cool: JVK
 

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One of these years I WILL turn up a Taricha granulosa mazamae, as they are in my neck of the woods.As far as I know, they haven't been seen for awhile, so that would be a cool little "claim to fame" :cool: JVK
Hahahahaha! You and me both! Good luck with that one! If you find any, let me know. I suspect if there are any left, they will be localized in a pond or slow movi g creek or something outside the lake.

Yeah Oregon has some stupid salamander laws but I dont think all caudates are illegal there. Here in washington, literally ALL caudates aside from Latin American species are illegal. The list is surprisingly thorough and quite absurd. They have things on there that will never see the pet trade. However, Washington does not enforce the law at all as they allow pet stores to sell caudates regularly. If you want to find ensatina, shoot me a pm. I'll give you some pointers

Josh
 

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Hahahahaha! You and me both! Good luck with that one! If you find any, let me know. I suspect if there are any left, they will be localized in a pond or slow movi g creek or something outside the lake.

Yeah Oregon has some stupid salamander laws but I dont think all caudates are illegal there. Here in washington, literally ALL caudates aside from Latin American species are illegal. The list is surprisingly thorough and quite absurd. They have things on there that will never see the pet trade. However, Washington does not enforce the law at all as they allow pet stores to sell caudates regularly. If you want to find ensatina, shoot me a pm. I'll give you some pointers

Josh
Pretty much all are illegal here as well. There are a few goofy oddball species that are allowed, basically a few that "someone" with a very, very, rudimentry grasp of taxonomy deemed "tropical" or "sub-tropical". For example, all Bufos ("all species and hybrids") are illegal here...except Bufo marinus! :eek:

Tylotriton, Triturus marmoratus and Salamandra are easily my most "desired" animals since childhood. I really bums me out when Shrom and others offer them for sale, and CB at that!

I'll let you know if I find any Crater Lake newts...;) Really the only caudates you can find out here on the east side of the Cascades is Ambystoma macrodactylum. JVK
 

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Josh, awesome photos. This is John from Caudata.org. I've been planning a west coast trip and it looks like you're the man to speak to about herping for Plethodontids on the west coast ;).
 

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Pretty much all are illegal here as well. There are a few goofy oddball species that are allowed, basically a few that "someone" with a very, very, rudimentry grasp of taxonomy deemed "tropical" or "sub-tropical". For example, all Bufos ("all species and hybrids") are illegal here...except Bufo marinus! :eek:

Tylotriton, Triturus marmoratus and Salamandra are easily my most "desired" animals since childhood. I really bums me out when Shrom and others offer them for sale, and CB at that!

I'll let you know if I find any Crater Lake newts...;) Really the only caudates you can find out here on the east side of the Cascades is Ambystoma macrodactylum. JVK

Yeah it really too bad about the laws. They don't make any sense sometimes. I am trying to get some locality specific marms directly from Europe. A close friend of mine is getting neururgus crocatus and neururgus dergerguni, a new species. They are both beautiful newt species. How often do you make it to the west side of the mountains? I can tell you where to find ensatina e. picta, aneides ferreus, aneides flavipunctatus, plethodon stormi, plethodon elongatus (big ones) and possibly some ensatina e. oregonensis integrades with platensis right there in southern Oregon.
 

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Josh, awesome photos. This is John from Caudata.org. I've been planning a west coast trip and it looks like you're the man to speak to about herping for Plethodontids on the west coast ;).
Hey John

I thought that was you. When are you planning on coming this way? And what in particular are you interested in finding? Feel free to contact me any time to talk caudates!
 

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Haha, I am not sure when. Perhaps in the fall? I'm interested in anything caudata. I would love to talk to you about them.
 

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Just a heads up mole salamanders can be a bit boring, I had a pair of tigers a few years back. Their are times when they would burrow and you wont seem them for quite a few weeks. I would assume pacific giants would be similar.
 

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Just a heads up mole salamanders can be a bit boring, I had a pair of tigers a few years back. Their are times when they would burrow and you wont seem them for quite a few weeks. I would assume pacific giants would be similar.
Pacific giants spend a lot of time on the surface and get very bold and not afraid of anything. They will beg for food and eat out of your hand though they hit HARD when they strike. It's startling hahaha!
 

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One of these years I WILL turn up a Taricha granulosa mazamae, as they are in my neck of the woods.As far as I know, they haven't been seen for awhile, so that would be a cool little "claim to fame" :cool: JVK
As far as I have read you can only find mazamae inside the rim and on a select few streams in crater lake. The cletewood trail is the only way I know of to get down to the lake.
 

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As far as I have read you can only find mazamae inside the rim and on a select few streams in crater lake. The cletewood trail is the only way I know of to get down to the lake.
I believe it's thought the actual lake population was extirpated by trout. I've never actually been down to the lake before. JVK
 

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I found a certain solid brown species of Ensatina at a park in Mill Creek/Snohomish, Wa. Ime anything over 65 degrees will start to turn them for the worse. In this case the cooler the better.
 
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