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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
These frogs are very interesting to me. I have 2 that are very rounded, and 1 that is more elongated. The behavior seen is silly to me. The 2 occupy the left side of the viv, and the 1 (rounded) stays on the right side prodominately. The frog that likes the right side will climb and go onto the glass walls and into the Pothos canopy. The others prefer to stay in the *Java Dish, and under the large thick dead leaves I have been using from work, lol! These guys put weight on fast, color up fast, and are just outgoing after the initial land-coming. Once they establish and start growing, you could pet them if desired! These guys are still small enough to fit 2 on a nickle(easily), very orange, and very active. They prefer larger prey items. I have offered them D. melanogaster, D. hydei, the maggots of both, Springtails, and Pheonix Worms. Of all the foods offered, by far, the maggots were taken with the absolute most vigor. I had run low on flies, and used some of the maggots as a carry over. I need to say that this food item was/are without a doubt relished by them(and many other-if not all-species)! The down side was that they are not easily "dusted". Of all the frogs I keep and have kept, these are different. They look at you as if to say "try me...." They have confidence beyond reason, and it is charming. I recommend them to anyone looking for a beautiful, personable frog.

*The Java Dish is a tuft of Java Moss held in a ceramic pot catch. They go there to dip their butts, and to just hang out on the edges.

I just wanted to share my experience with this species. Thanks for reading!

JBear
 

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On monday I had one of my mints jump about 6 inches to strike my finger as i was placing in some new moss...made us both jump back! Dont know if it was a bite or an accidental too far curious jump towards me or what...

I love my mints though....and they are amazing to watch while eating small crickets!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
On monday I had one of my mints jump about 6 inches to strike my finger as i was placing in some new moss...made us both jump back! Dont know if it was a bite or an accidental too far curious jump towards me or what...

I love my mints though....and they are amazing to watch while eating small crickets!
I would imagine you were working by a favored hide. The terrible frog probably saw you reaching in and dove toward an area in which to hide not knowing that you were reaching there. In truth, I find it hard to believe P. terribilis will bite a finger as a predatory response. This, IMHO, is myth, meant to dramatize a(this) species that has good enough credentials to make it an interesting frog/captive period. I can't wait until these guys are big enough to try small crickets, but I will use my "handicap method". I remove the rear legs before feeding to anything I have ever kept(Not saying that I never tossed in a cricket with back legs, but I never liked seeing undigested cricket legs in the fecal).

JBear
 

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I. In truth, I find it hard to believe P. terribilis will bite a finger as a predatory response.
I don't.. Once the animal becomes conditioned to you as a supplier of food, you as food is an easy transition... I worked with a number of species that attempted to consume me..... As a couple of examples, while at the Zoo, the fire belly toads got to the point that when I opened the cage to clean the glass, they would leap at me with thier mouths open repeatedly.. another example was a grey treefrog that when I went to nudge it to move so I could clean the glass, turned around and seized my finger and tried to stuff it into it's mouth further...

There are also a lot of records of various species of anurans consuming something too large to fit all of the way into thier mouth at one time, digesting what they could and then stuffing in more....

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don't.. Once the animal becomes conditioned to you as a supplier of food, you as food is an easy transition... I worked with a number of species that attempted to consume me..... As a couple of examples, while at the Zoo, the fire belly toads got to the point that when I opened the cage to clean the glass, they would leap at me with thier mouths open repeatedly.. another example was a grey treefrog that when I went to nudge it to move so I could clean the glass, turned around and seized my finger and tried to stuff it into it's mouth further...

There are also a lot of records of various species of anurans consuming something too large to fit all of the way into thier mouth at one time, digesting what they could and then stuffing in more....

Ed
If you were to apply this to all frogs and toads, of course there is documentation. I just find it hard to believe a frog that prefers the size of prey that is common to darts, will suddenly abandon natural fear and jump toward a human hand/finger intentionally with intent to feed on the finger(s). I agree conditioning is a reality, but I don't know if I buy "finger vs terribilis".

JBear
 

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I don't.. Once the animal becomes conditioned to you as a supplier of food, you as food is an easy transition... I worked with a number of species that attempted to consume me..... As a couple of examples, while at the Zoo, the fire belly toads got to the point that when I opened the cage to clean the glass, they would leap at me with thier mouths open repeatedly.. another example was a grey treefrog that when I went to nudge it to move so I could clean the glass, turned around and seized my finger and tried to stuff it into it's mouth further...

There are also a lot of records of various species of anurans consuming something too large to fit all of the way into thier mouth at one time, digesting what they could and then stuffing in more....

Ed
I've kept large breeding groups of yellow and orange terriblis and they both exhibited similar behavior. My oranges would hop right onto my hand, arm, whatever, they feared nothing. Their personality, boldness, call, and size makes them a great species to keep. However two big groups will eat you out of house and home!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've kept large breeding groups of yellow and orange terriblis and they both exhibited similar behavior. My oranges would hop right onto my hand, arm, whatever, they feared nothing. Their personality, boldness, call, and size makes them a great species to keep. However two big groups will eat you out of house and home!
Hopping onto your hand is not the same as biting a finger. Am I wrong?

My Tincs would have liked a stroll around the house on my shoulder. Was it conditioning, yes. Would they have mistaken my fingers as a meal, never.

JBear
 

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If you were to apply this to all frogs and toads, of course there is documentation. I just find it hard to believe a frog that prefers the size of prey that is common to darts, will suddenly abandon natural fear and jump toward a human hand/finger intentionally with intent to feed on the finger(s). I agree conditioning is a reality, but I don't know if I buy "finger vs terribilis".

JBear
Keep in mind that the terriblis unlike the majority of other dendrobatids routinely feeds on relatively large prey items..... and that terriblis are very bold both in the wild and in captivity...

I can't find the link now but on one of the European sites they had pictures of a terriblis eating a small lizard housed with it...

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Keep in mind that the terriblis unlike the majority of other dendrobatids routinely feeds on relatively large prey items..... and that terriblis are very bold both in the wild and in captivity...

I can't find the link now but on one of the European sites they had pictures of a terriblis eating a small lizard housed with it...

Ed
I saw that pic. It was posted here. It was a baby gecko of sorts. Fingers or no fingers, this was intended to be a thread to allow people to share the experiences they have had, so thank you for contributing! Maybe mine will astound me by biting my hand one day, who's to say? Thanks!

JBear
 

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I can very easily see a terribilis lunging at someone. Whenever I go to feed mine, one or two of them will jump at the container and try to get the insects before they're even pouring out. And as completely fearless as they are, I doubt they'd think anything of going after something no matter what the size.

...but isn't that why we love these frogs? They fear nothing. When they eat, they practically slam themselves against their prey. (I swear that mine are determined to flatten their food before eating.) A finger isn't going to phase them. If something moves around them, it's just in their nature to try and eat it. It's what makes them so freaking cool.
 

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Haha, yea I'm not sure what had happened, but his face definitely hit my finger...hard! Wasn't near a hide, nor was he. With my mints, it seems that as soon as they see something move, they strike at it. I absolutely love watching them eat!

Does anyone else's stare upward a lot? Mine are always out in the open looking up....I cant figure out why.
 

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Haha, yea I'm not sure what had happened, but his face definitely hit my finger...hard! Wasn't near a hide, nor was he. With my mints, it seems that as soon as they see something move, they strike at it. I absolutely love watching them eat!

Does anyone else's stare upward a lot? Mine are always out in the open looking up....I cant figure out why.


*blinded by staring at the lights for prolonged periods*

Jk I honestly have not a clue as to why they do it. My juvi mints do it from time to time. Seems more so as they age.
 

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My large adult female mint has "bit" my finger before. It was like she was trying to gum my finger to death. She always jumps straight for the feeding cup and it's usually a game where I have to fake her out before I can drop in food; otherwise, she jumps right in the feeding cup. She knows the difference between feeding time and me just messing around in the tank. I can pull eggs, trim plants, etc and she minds her own business...if I have the feeding cup in hand, all bets are off.

As far as my experience goes, terribilis are the only dart frogs that will eat things that don't fit in their mouth (like an earthworm). They will actually push it in with their front arms if they can't swallow it in one bite.

Kevin
 

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Does anyone else's stare upward a lot? Mine are always out in the open looking up....I cant figure out why.
I think they're looking for food. Mine do it all the time, but noticeably more often if I've just fed them and they're hunting.

...and for some reason, when I see them like that, I always end up having dreams about giant terribilis invading Tokyo. I'm pretty sure that the person who came up with Godzilla had mints.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It had seemed so very unliekly to me.... I feel silly and thankful for the correction and the sharing of experiences. These are amazing gems! Mine are very young yet, and this is my first go with them.

I will add that mine, young as they are, do stare more upwards than the other darts I have when resting. I, after reading some other's experiences, would theorize they are glutinously waiting for the "manna from the sky"....

Keep the observations coming, it has been a very cool discussion thus far!

JBear
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
My only concern with this species' ability/desire to consume as big/much as possible is that people who care for them will overlook what is good for the frog to see what it will take.

In my opinion Chitin(as seen in crickets and mealworms, etc.) should not be offered too much. Earthworms, on the other hand, particuarly the garden worm variety, are a great addition to the diet as long as they come from untreated(pesticides, herbicides, etc.) soil.

I would reccomend moths, and small grubs. I think the moths would allow the frogs a good hunt, and be rather high quality as a supplemental feeder. The grubs can be harvested from the grass roots. Simply take a shovel and cut very shallow in the ground so that only a scraping of grass is lifted. if the grubs are present, and the lawn/land is untreated, these would be a good addition to the diet of P. terribilis, and would be a better option than mealworms IMHO. I used to collect grubs for Salamanders and Newts, so I have an inclination to suggest them.

I guess harvesting foods locally poses a risk of pathogen transmission, maybe some would not want to take that risk. Just to highlight some risks...

JBear
 

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I've kept large breeding groups of yellow and orange terriblis and they both exhibited similar behavior. My oranges would hop right onto my hand, arm, whatever, they feared nothing. Their personality, boldness, call, and size makes them a great species to keep. However two big groups will eat you out of house and home!
I think that they fear nothing because they are the most poisonous frog in the world:eek: hence terrible frog....just saying;)
 

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They are the most bold I have worked with, especially mints but I have never had one lunge toward me, not move or approach me yes so I believe the hide opinion to be the most appropriate since when they eat although quick to it they do not lunge, they are like other darts and taking a lizard or anything bigger than a cricket I think is a big stretch, they do get big but come on now!
 
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