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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have (had?) three cultures of springtails that were finally starting to boom. They're on charcoal in largeish plastic/tupperware containers. I'm not sure what kind they are besides being white. I mostly fed them on yeast but drop in the occasional piece of fruit leftover, peel, or seed. Last night I was munching on some "Cuties" (easy-peel clementine things) and dropped a few pieces of the peel into each container.
This morning there is no movement in any of the cultures and I noticed some floaters. I took out the peels, is there anything else I can do (maybe the eggs aren't all dead?) to hopefully bring the cultures back? Each container has about 1/4-1 inch of water in the bottom, should I dump that and add new water?
Thanks for any help!
 

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It has happened to me before. Open the top for 5 minutes and put it back on. Mine all come back to life like they were sleeping
 

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Springtails do lay eggs and it is possible to see a completely dead looking culture bounce back. First make sure they are truly dead. Then remove the peels and perhaps the substrate they were sitting on. Changing the water might be a good idea too. Then don't throw them out until it looks dead for at least a month.
Isopods would be a different story as they hold their live young under their tails. If you kill an isopod culture it is a dead culture.

I have often wondered if citrus could hurt your frogs or cultures. I avoid particularly acidic fruits and also particularly spicy veggies like hot peppers, onions or garlic (I have used bell peppers though).
 

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I routinely use orange pieces (with peel) in my enclosures as a feeding station for the frogs but I also make sure to throughly wash the orange to prevent pesticide residues from making it into the cultures. I also use pieces of orange to provide moisture to crickets and roaches as part of thier culturing as a routine practice.
When I check enclosures after the lights are out, I see springtails, and isopods feeding on the orange pulp and peel.

Often people don't wash the oranges since the peel isn't consumed and I would suspect that the pesticide residues are the concern.

Ed
 

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I knew somebody who had a 35-year old parrot, a lifelong companion, die when it ate peels with oranges. She had never fed it that way but the bird was in somebody else's care while she was away and that's when it happened.
 

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I knew somebody who had a 35-year old parrot, a lifelong companion, die when it ate peels with oranges. She had never fed it that way but the bird was in somebody else's care while she was away and that's when it happened.
I have doubts about it since I know institutions (and private people) that routinely add it as part of the diet (usually for enrichment purposes). There are a lot of other things that can cause unexplained deaths in parrots including heating teflon lined pans too high...

Ed
 

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I routinely use orange pieces (with peel) in my enclosures as a feeding station for the frogs but I also make sure to throughly wash the orange to prevent pesticide residues from making it into the cultures. I also use pieces of orange to provide moisture to crickets and roaches as part of thier culturing as a routine practice.
When I check enclosures after the lights are out, I see springtails, and isopods feeding on the orange pulp and peel.

Often people don't wash the oranges since the peel isn't consumed and I would suspect that the pesticide residues are the concern.

Ed
Good to know, Ed. I've always wondered about the acidic fruits.
 

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Orange Peel Oil is used effectively as an insecticide

Orange Peel Spray
Oranges and other citrus fruit contain natural occurring pesticide compounds called limonene and linalool. These compounds can be used as a treatment for soft bodied pests such as aphids, fungus gnats, mealy bugs and as an ant repellant.

Insect Treatments

Dr. Rod's invention takes advantage of differences between insects and humans. Unlike man, the breathing passages of ants and all other insects are waterproofed by a wax lining. The food-grade ingredients in BUGS 'R' DONETM soften and dissolve this wax lining, clogging the passageways and quickly leading to the insect's death.

ORANGE! The New
 

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Orange Peel Oil is used effectively as an insecticide

Orange Peel Spray
Oranges and other citrus fruit contain natural occurring pesticide compounds called limonene and linalool. These compounds can be used as a treatment for soft bodied pests such as aphids, fungus gnats, mealy bugs and as an ant repellant.

Insect Treatments

Dr. Rod's invention takes advantage of differences between insects and humans. Unlike man, the breathing passages of ants and all other insects are waterproofed by a wax lining. The food-grade ingredients in BUGS 'R' DONETM soften and dissolve this wax lining, clogging the passageways and quickly leading to the insect's death.

ORANGE! The New
That is concentrated limonene from the peels. It is very different than the peel itself... There are a huge variety of invertebrates that will feed on oranges and the peels.. In one tank I've been battling small brown snails and slugs, and I routinely find both of those along with the flies and isopods feeding in and on the fruit.. as a small example see Citrus: Identifying Invertebrate Damage to Fruit—UC IPM

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for all the info, folks!
Just to be safe I won't be adding any more peels from those clementines to my cultures. I had taken out the peels and changed the water but they still haven't come back. Luckily I have pretty decent populations of springs in my iso cultures and I was able to re-seed them all.
An interesting thing to note, I forgot I had added some peels from the same clementines to a viv I recently built to feed the bugs in there. I looked in there yesterday and the peels had a few bugs crawling on them and the bug population in general seemed to be booming. Maybe the issue was with the peels being air-sealed in a culture instead of being allowed to breathe?
 

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