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That is awesome, Ed. Not surprising. My female has gone after my fingers on multiple occasions.
There have been a few witness accounts posted here over the past couple of years as well, but this is definitely the first picture. Awesome for us, not so much for the lizard ;)
 

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To the best of my knowledge, terribilis will ignore their own froglets as food. I've often wondered what allows them to make this distinction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
To the best of my knowledge, terribilis will ignore their own froglets as food. I've often wondered what allows them to make this distinction.
Olfaction at the very least and probably taste are well developed in some other dendrobatids so I wouldn't be surprised if that was the case with terriblis. For an indication of olfactory ability see
JSTOR: An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie

http://elibrary.ru/item.asp?id=12787903

ScienceDirect - Animal Behaviour : The smell of success: choice of larval rearing sites by means of chemical cues in a Peruvian poison frog

Sorry the first two are not available as free access.

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
That is awesome, Ed. Not surprising. My female has gone after my fingers on multiple occasions.
Thanks Ray, your the first post that saw it as something cool and not a banner on not to mix.. I think the documentation of a dendrobatid predating on a vertebrate is pretty cool (and I have to admit, I'm not surprised it was a terriblis after seeing how big of a prey item they are willing to tackle).

Ed
 

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I think it's a great photo! I'm not a reptile fan though. I'm very curious to know if terribilis will eat thumbnail darts. I'm not kidding. I'm sure someone knows too.
 

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Thanks Ray, your the first post that saw it as something cool and not a banner on not to mix.. I think the documentation of a dendrobatid predating on a vertebrate is pretty cool (and I have to admit, I'm not surprised it was a terriblis after seeing how big of a prey item they are willing to tackle).

Ed
thanks, Ed. I've actually experimented with feeding them and have had them take full size B. lateralis, large dubia, superworms, waxworms, large moths, silverfish, pretty much anything large that I can find. I'm sure they would take geckos/anoles as well. Maybe I'll try some goldfish in a bowl... :)
 

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thanks, Ed. I've actually experimented with feeding them and have had them take full size B. lateralis, large dubia, superworms, waxworms, large moths, silverfish, pretty much anything large that I can find. I'm sure they would take geckos/anoles as well. Maybe I'll try some goldfish in a bowl... :)
Do it! Also, set up your video camera while the experiment is under way :)
 

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I have always heard foods like goldfish will contribute to fat reserves that show up as corneal opacities, like Cataracts. I would be in support of a wide variety of invertabrate prey, but I would draw the line before feeding vertebrates as a dietary supplement. This is not to say an occassional vertebrate isn't consumed in nature, but I have to assume this is few and far between, and the more these items are forced into the diet, the more health issues that become potentialities.

JBear
 

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That's scary and concerning. I think this should be a sticky for newer members to see.
 

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Thanks for posting that. I duno if there's something wrong with me, but I enjoy seeing out-of-the-norm food items being eaten by dart frogs (or any frogs for that matter)
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I have always heard foods like goldfish will contribute to fat reserves that show up as corneal opacities, like Cataracts. I would be in support of a wide variety of invertabrate prey, but I would draw the line before feeding vertebrates as a dietary supplement. This is not to say an occassional vertebrate isn't consumed in nature, but I have to assume this is few and far between, and the more these items are forced into the diet, the more health issues that become potentialities.

JBear
I have to say that there is a huge amount on this out there based mostly on speculation.... Goldfish are actually a poor choice for a feeder due to the high levels of bad cholesterol... The frequency of offering is the problem. As an example. a pink mouse is about the same size as an adult domestic cricket yet it weighs about 5-7 times as much as the cricket so it is more nutrient dense. People tend to already feed amphibians excessively and if you include nutrient dense prey items, then the risk of obesity is multiplied and hence the link to corneal lipidosis. In addition, corneal lipidosis is frequently seen in frogs that have never been fed vertebrate prey animals... it is simply that they have been overfed..

Deceased goldfish are also an extremely poor choice as feeder whether they are frozen or not, this is due to the high levels of thiaminase in tissues.

Ed
 
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