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The light should not be capable of burning inhabitants with or without a dimmer.
Did you read where three of us pointed out that we do not get the same temps with that unit as the OP does, suggesting either that the particular light/driver at issue is faulty, or the IR gun is faulty?

Also, please keep in mind that none of us know what anyone's past history or experience is. When comments about the subject matter are made here, they typically assume an intelligent but not specially knowledgeable audience unless the context or previous posts in the thread dictate a different approach.
 

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I did read the thread, thanks. And they do market it for housing animals. It says "vivarium" plastered everywhere on their site. What other pets could go in a vivarium besides reptiles and amphibians? Hamsters.

The light should not be capable of burning inhabitants with or without a dimmer. I don't appreciate your condescending tone, especially since your speaking to someone who ran a research greenhouse. I know just a little about high light plants.
I'm not suggesting in any way shape or form what your experience level is with plants, reptiles or amphibians. I'm only commenting on your post, which reads as though you haven't read any of the prior discussion. You may have found my post arrogant, but I found yours ignorant. So I guess we are even now.

I retract my comment regarding reptiles. The website does say dwarf gecko's - and I would assume anything small and in need of high humidity would also be ok here.
 

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A man is always better than his printed opinion.

- Twain, i think
 

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Reptiles are more likely to receive chronically induced thermal burns
hugging up to lighted panels and screens that are sub temp than screen portions and heated panels that are 'too hot'. Within reason and rational environment design withstanding. Common illustration chameleon with lesion on belly from hanging upside down day after day under too weak a watt/setting instead of being able to attain a potz standing in a normal basking pose under a correct level of radiant heat. Chams are radiant baskers so not the best analogy. But reptiles read higher zone temperatures pretty well.

I am not saying its not a good idea to turn it down for the geckos.

But they are not going to broil their feet on the panel as readily as you might think.
 

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I did read the thread, thanks. And they do market it for housing animals. It says "vivarium" plastered everywhere on their site. What other pets could go in a vivarium besides reptiles and amphibians? Hamsters.
Arachnids, crustaceans, insects, etc...
 

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I think you have a legit reason to write about your experience but you have been told to contact the company. IMO, you should only be commenting back on those exchanges otherwise, you are beating your own dead horse.
 

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Considering that Bill got back to me inside of 5 minutes via email when I had an issue, I can't imagine the OP's issues haven't been addressed in detail by now.

(One of my Altos had a slow leak from the trench-drain assembly -- 5-second fix as I just needed to tighten the nut to seal the gasket. So actually a non-issue ... I only contacted Bill because the Alto was already partially set-up and I couldn't work out if I needed to seal it via silicone or what, as inspecting it in detail wasn't an option.)
 

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I did read the thread, thanks. And they do market it for housing animals. It says "vivarium" plastered everywhere on their site. What other pets could go in a vivarium besides reptiles and amphibians? Hamsters.

The light should not be capable of burning inhabitants with or without a dimmer. I don't appreciate your condescending tone, especially since your speaking to someone who ran a research greenhouse. I know just a little about high light plants.
Hi Everyone! Somehow this thread escaped our notice. But, Wow! did it go through some issues! Creative tension is always welcome, as it helps us design better and better systems for our future!

The In Situ lights are designed to give great flexibility to the desires of the hobbyist that is using them. Our lights have a maximum output of about 44 watts, which is about 3 times higher than most lights on the market. This dynamic ranges is necessary for some plants. The best way to use the lights is with a controller that ramps them from zero to 100% throughout the day, with a maximum peak of 100% for an hour or two, but no more. This duration will color up bromeliads and not over heat the terrarium in a temperature controlled room. We offer the Apex to control lighting, as well as monitor and effect temperature driven issues. We don't say it often, but maybe we should: incorporating a programmable controller into your collection room is an important step towards an optimally performing system that manages all of the functions and temperature. In the future, we will offer other controllers, as people are working on better solutions all of the time. In lieu of a controller, we suggest turning down the dimmer so that the hobbyist can dial in the light that is necessary, as well as make determinations about the temperature and conditions that are present in his/her room. Manually controlling lighting will likely require seasonal adjustments, as ambient conditions change. Its hard to remember, but every hobbyist's conditions are different. Some extreme examples include where we live in the Pacific Northwest, versus Phoenix, Denver, Miami, or New York. Humidity, temperature, and, even daylight changes with latitude as well as longitude.

Our circulation system has features that should be understood as well. First, we start off with a 12 volt fan, and de-rate it to 9 volts to help reduce noise. With this voltage, we can exchange the air in the vivarium about 3 times per minute per fan. So, there is substantial flow (even though it may not appear so). Additionally, the fan is treated to be "waterproof" (water resistant). We use ball bearings to improve the life as well as reduce noise. Overall, the fans should not be overly loud. But, some fans can be a little noisy. What we have found is that the fan itself can be manufactured out of balance, in which case, it will make a noise when removed from the housing. Second, sometimes the screen rubs on the impellor blades. In this case, we use a thin blunt object to push the screen away from the blades, and that usually solves the problems. In any case, if the fans are bothering you, please remember to connect with us and we will certainly replace them for you. Lastly, we should note that if you would like more air flow, the voltage can be increased to the rated 12 volts without any degradation to the system. We stock 12 volt power supplies, so we can easily make the swap for you if you desire it (just let us know).

We hope this unravels some of the knots tied up in this thread. And, if not, remember to connect with us so we can jump in when necessary!

Thanks for the discussion!

Bill/In Situ
 
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