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Dendrobates Tinctorius Alalapadu Cobalt F1 1.1.0
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my new acquisition of an established viv looks to be in great shape, however the builder never added isopod sand mentioned that the springtails all died.
Why would they have died?
Should I consider adding both now? My understanding is that they should be added prior to the frogs. Is it too late?
 

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So my new acquisition of an established viv looks to be in great shape, however the builder never added isopod sand mentioned that the springtails all died.
Why would they have died?
Should I consider adding both now? My understanding is that they should be added prior to the frogs. Is it too late?
Not sure why they may have died, but it’s never too late to add more CuC! Even in a viv with established micro fauna, you can add more to replenish or top them off. I’d say, go ahead.


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Dendrobates Tinctorius Alalapadu Cobalt F1 1.1.0
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks, makes good sense. I’ve also been wondering what keeps the CuC from overpopulating the tank? I imagine the frogs don’t eat them due to exoskeleton, but ST’s are most likely a welcome snack?
 

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I think that the populations self-limit, in terms of over population. The isos or spring populations can only get so large before they outgrow their food supply of waste, rotting leaves, etc.

It’s always helpful to have extra CuC on hand though, especially with Ranitomeya froglets. I keep a couple starter cultures going and periodically top-off my vivs every now and then.

I think frogs will also readily eat dwarf white isos since they’re so small. Any larger isos though I imagine are safe from predation, at least as adults. Depends on the frogs though. I think Terribilis will eat things relatively large, from what I’ve read, anyways.


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Just to be clear, using any isos other than dwarf species in a dart viv is pretty off-script activity and not recommended unless a person has extensive experience both with the frog species and the iso species. I wouldn't put any non-dwarf isos in my frog vivs for anything.
 

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Just to be clear, using any isos other than dwarf species in a dart viv is pretty off-script activity and not recommended unless a person has extensive experience both with the frog species and the iso species. I wouldn't put any non-dwarf isos in my frog vivs for anything.
I made this mistake when I first started, I put a larger iso (powder orange, I think) in with thumbs. They seemed to coexist fine, but the isos were voracious and ended up eating the leaf-litter and hard scape so eventually I removed them and learned my lesson.


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A 1.0.1 pair of dentrabates tink azerus, a 0.0.2 pair of aruatus green and bronze and a 1.1 pair of
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So my new acquisition of an established viv looks to be in great shape, however the builder never added isopod sand mentioned that the springtails all died.
Why would they have died?
Should I consider adding both now? My understanding is that they should be added prior to the frogs. Is it too late?
Doesn’t rlly matter but it’s always good to have a master culture just to add them every few weeks or so I would go with dwarf unless you know about the species
 

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I think its a good question of the ST's would die off. Maybe nothing to eat. But tanks don't have to have iso's. Although there's nothing wrong with it either, obviously. I keep a good ST population because I my two different species, one being Chazuta's like to eat them, and they do a good job of eating and dead FF's that may be there. I saw a group of them once feasting on one. Hopefully they also eat frog doo too!
 

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Every vivarium is going to have a carrying capacity that is self limiting in terms of microfauna. Once the vivarium reaches a balance (which may take months) you will not see the overabundance of microfauna seen upon initial setup. (This is also assuming you aren’t using the wrong species of isopods). I rarely see springtails and dwarf whites in my oldest vivariums anymore but they are still there. If I dig around in the substrate I’ll find a few here and there. It can’t hurt to add more but it’s not a catastrophe if you don’t assuming the vivarium is properly established. Springtails are only one part of the vivarium dynamic and are very helpful in the beginning. As time goes by though and the tank reaches a balance you’ll find that they still serve a purpose but not as significant as during the initial cycling. Adding more from time to time is perfectly acceptable though.
 
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