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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to posion dart frogs, but I'm not new to keeping amphibians, reptiles, fish, et cetera. I've been doing some research on keeping these frogs, and I have to say that they seem like they would be a pleasure to keep.

I fell in love with this frog and I would absolutely love to have at least one, if not two of these. Apparently, it's a Tinctorius black and white morph that I have not been able to find for sale anywhere online. Here's a photo -



I have a very nice 15 gallon tank just waiting for two frogs.
 

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I'm new to posion dart frogs, but I'm not new to keeping amphibians, reptiles, fish, et cetera. I've been doing some research on keeping these frogs, and I have to say that they seem like they would be a pleasure to keep.

I fell in love with this frog and I would absolutely love to have at least one, if not two of these. Apparently, it's a Tinctorius black and white morph that I have not been able to find for sale anywhere online. Here's a photo -



I have a very nice 15 gallon tank just waiting for two frogs.
It is Dendrobates Tinctorius "Powder Blue"
 

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They are way better looking in person. A number of our members and sponsors here breed them here and they are stunning !
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Quick responses here! Much quicker than most boards I'm on.

Does anyone on here sell this grey morph? Also, would a 15 gallon be enough for three?
 

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Quick responses here! Much quicker than most boards I'm on.

Does anyone on here sell this grey morph? Also, would a 15 gallon be enough for three?
15 is a little small for a trio. A 20 long would be good. A 40 breeder would be even better. It's important to know that female tincs can be extremely aggressive. If you start with froglets, you need to be prepared to separate if you end up with more than one female.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
15 is a little small for a trio. A 20 long would be good. A 40 breeder would be even better. It's important to know that female tincs can be extremely aggressive. If you start with froglets, you need to be prepared to separate if you end up with more than one female.
I'm okay with just one or two. I was only wondering. I have a 40 breeder, but it's going to be a community aquarium for several fairly rare fish species. I also have a 20 long, but again, that will be for my Blue Crayfish. I have two 20 high gallon tanks, one is for Japanese Fire Belly Newts with several uncommon Danio and Rasbora fish, and the other is my Red Cherry Shrimp and Oto fish tank. I have two 10 gallon tanks, one is a divided male Betta tank, and the other is a Leopard Gecko tank. So I do keep a wide variety of animals.

Is there a way to tell if the tinc is a male or a female?

Its a fun an addicting hobby. How are you setting up your tank? I think a 15 is good for your 1st viv. A 40B is a little to big for a beginner to me depending how you are setting it up. However you can get a 40B from petco for $50.
It's actually not my first vivarium. I just have space limitations right now or otherwise I would have huge vivariums. I'm just new to dart frog keeping.

I'm going to go with black aquarium gravel as substrate with either silk plants since the shelf that this 15g will be on doesn't have room for a UV light to provide UV for real plants, just a LED strip to provide light. It will have wood caves, peat moss or sphagnum moss, etc. The top is a full glass top with plastic at the back to provide a full covering and close to 100% humidity for the frogs.
 

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I'm okay with just one or two.

Is there a way to tell if the tinc is a male or a female?
I believe the recommended space for tincs is 10G/frog. Also keep in mind that the species appreciates horizontal space much more than vertical space.

Males usually have much bigger/wider toe pads than females for most tinc morphs.

Read up =]:
http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/care-sheets/14606-dendrobates-azureus-tinctorius-novice.html
Saurian Enterprises, Inc :: Dendrobates tinctorius "Powderblue"
 

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I'm okay with just one or two. I was only wondering. I have a 40 breeder, but it's going to be a community aquarium for several fairly rare fish species. I also have a 20 long, but again, that will be for my Blue Crayfish. I have two 20 high gallon tanks, one is for Japanese Fire Belly Newts with several uncommon Danio and Rasbora fish, and the other is my Red Cherry Shrimp and Oto fish tank. I have two 10 gallon tanks, one is a divided male Betta tank, and the other is a Leopard Gecko tank. So I do keep a wide variety of animals.

Is there a way to tell if the tinc is a male or a female?
Yes there is, but not until they are close to a year old. The differences are subtle and usually hard for someone new to darts to pick out. You could save yourself any headache by just asking around for a sexed pair.
 

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I'm okay with just one or two. I was only wondering. I have a 40 breeder, but it's going to be a community aquarium for several fairly rare fish species. I also have a 20 long, but again, that will be for my Blue Crayfish. I have two 20 high gallon tanks, one is for Japanese Fire Belly Newts with several uncommon Danio and Rasbora fish, and the other is my Red Cherry Shrimp and Oto fish tank. I have two 10 gallon tanks, one is a divided male Betta tank, and the other is a Leopard Gecko tank. So I do keep a wide variety of animals.

Is there a way to tell if the tinc is a male or a female?



It's actually not my first vivarium. I just have space limitations right now or otherwise I would have huge vivariums. I'm just new to dart frog keeping.

I'm going to go with black aquarium gravel as substrate with either silk plants since the shelf that this 15g will be on doesn't have room for a UV light to provide UV for real plants, just a LED strip to provide light. It will have wood caves, peat moss or sphagnum moss, etc. The top is a full glass top with plastic at the back to provide a full covering and close to 100% humidity for the frogs.
First off, a just gravel substrate is irritating and could cause stress. You need either the ABG mix (check out joshs frogs or NEherp), Leaf litter over that, and a hydroton or egg crate false bottom to collect water. Also darts need almost 100% humidity, so gravel is not an option. ALSO, silk plants aren't helping you too much with humidity either. You need live plants if you want to give your frogs a natural habitat. Plant's don't need UV light either. Just a regular CFL or strip light, and better yet LEDS are fine for the plants, and frogs don't need UVB, and I don't think they benefit from UVB.
 

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Sorry, but this is not the case. I cycle my frogs down in the winter months and the humidity drops as low as 65-70%. There is water available in case I cross the line.
I know, but I like to keep mine at high humidy, so if there is a problem, the humidty wouldn't be my first concern, and I don't like the dry look of a viv. Really, you can keep darts at 70% + Humidity, but I would get worried if it got too low.
 

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I don't want to appear as I'm being rude, but reducing humidity and food intake generally stops/slows the frogs from breeding, which is a very important part of husbandry. Breeding takes a lot out of the frogs and a rest period is needed. I'd like to see my frogs year round and have a wet looking viv, but they need to chill at some point.

Best
 

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I don't want to appear as I'm being rude, but reducing humidity and food intake generally stops/slows the frogs from breeding, which is a very important part of husbandry. Breeding takes a lot out of the frogs and a rest period is needed. I'd like to see my frogs year round and have a wet looking viv, but they need to chill at some point.

Best
That is interesting, thank you for telling me. I might do that when and if winter comes lol....
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I believe the recommended space for tincs is 10G/frog. Also keep in mind that the species appreciates horizontal space much more than vertical space.

Males usually have much bigger/wider toe pads than females for most tinc morphs.

Read up =]:
http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/care-sheets/14606-dendrobates-azureus-tinctorius-novice.html
Saurian Enterprises, Inc :: Dendrobates tinctorius "Powderblue"
Thanks for the additional information! Would there be any different species that would be okay with a single tinc in the 15 gallon?

First off, a just gravel substrate is irritating and could cause stress. You need either the ABG mix (check out joshs frogs or NEherp), Leaf litter over that, and a hydroton or egg crate false bottom to collect water. Also darts need almost 100% humidity, so gravel is not an option. ALSO, silk plants aren't helping you too much with humidity either. You need live plants if you want to give your frogs a natural habitat. Plant's don't need UV light either. Just a regular CFL or strip light, and better yet LEDS are fine for the plants, and frogs don't need UVB, and I don't think they benefit from UVB.
In that case, then that's what I'll do. I actually prefer live plants to silk/fake plants, they're just more appealing as well as natural. I was going off this site for the substrate -

Poison Dart Frog Care Sheet

Poison dart frogs do well on many types of substrate. Several soil mix recipes exist, but my personal experience leads me to the conclusion that a nonorganic substrate is ideal in the wet conditions of a poison dart frog terrarium. Organic substrates rot or sour fairly quickly, and this can cause the tank to take on a swampy smell and begin to culture fungus gnats. One of the worst substrates in this regard is ground coconut husk, which rots in a matter of months.

My breeding facility has been using one-eighth-inch natural aquarium gravel in tanks for many years. This substrate looks natural when the tank is decorated with plants, dried leaves, cork-bark hide spots and patches of moss.
 

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Thanks for the additional information! Would there be any different species that would be okay with a single tinc in the 15 gallon?
The general consensus is that you should not mix different species of dart frogs in a small vivarium, as this causes stress to the animals which might lead to the loss of an animal (which is not ideal). This is especially true with tincs, as they are very territorial, which is why they have such a big space requirement to be happy. D. leucomelas is a better "group frog", and I think you would be able to put 2 in your tank.
Saurian Enterprises, Inc :: Dendrobates leucomelas

In that case, then that's what I'll do. I actually prefer live plants to silk/fake plants, they're just more appealing as well as natural. I was going off this site for the substrate -

Poison Dart Frog Care Sheet
A planted vivarium creates a more natural environment for your frogs, and if you have sufficient vegetation/hiding spots your frogs will feel a lot more safe, so they'll come out more and you'll be able to see them more.
In order to combat mold most people employ microfauna in their vivs in the form of isopods and springtails, which eat mold. They also make tasty snacks for the frogs.
 

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Gravel, still, is'nt ideal. Search up "ABG" . It takes years to break down, plants go wild in it, and it drains just as well as gravel. For a 15 gallon, 2 gallons of hydroton should go on the very bottom, then a screen separator, then 2 gallons of the ABG mix. That website, in my opinion, doesn't have the best information. Commercially available substrates like "Eco earth" and stuff like that do not drain, and just become water logged. the ABG goes like this
1 part peat (Either chunky, fine, etc. Chunky I think is best)
1 part spagnum moss
1 part horticulture grade charcoal, fine/medium or aquarium charcoal
2 parts tree fern fiber, course
2 parts fine/course orchid bark

From others experience, I've never heard a case of it breaking down yet, and I know that Pumilo's son, Frogboy has had it in a salamander viv for years and it's in near-perfect condition.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The general consensus is that you should not mix different species of dart frogs in a small vivarium, as this causes stress to the animals which might lead to the loss of an animal (which is not ideal). This is especially true with tincs, as they are very territorial, which is why they have such a big space requirement to be happy. D. leucomelas is a better "group frog", and I think you would be able to put 2 in your tank.
Saurian Enterprises, Inc :: Dendrobates leucomelas



A planted vivarium creates a more natural environment for your frogs, and if you have sufficient vegetation/hiding spots your frogs will feel a lot more safe, so they'll come out more and you'll be able to see them more.
In order to combat mold most people employ microfauna in their vivs in the form of isopods and springtails, which eat mold. They also make tasty snacks for the frogs.
Any other recommended species? Otherwise, just one "gray" morph of the powerblue tinc is fine with me. I finally went to the local reptile expo in Raleigh, NC and saw some dart frogs in person. I didn't realize that dart frogs were this tiny! Granted, most looked like froglets, but I got a better understanding of the vivariums that they live in just by looking at the display cases they had at the expo. How would I go about acquiring the isopods and springtails?

Gravel, still, is'nt ideal. Search up "ABG" . It takes years to break down, plants go wild in it, and it drains just as well as gravel. For a 15 gallon, 2 gallons of hydroton should go on the very bottom, then a screen separator, then 2 gallons of the ABG mix. That website, in my opinion, doesn't have the best information. Commercially available substrates like "Eco earth" and stuff like that do not drain, and just become water logged. the ABG goes like this
1 part peat (Either chunky, fine, etc. Chunky I think is best)
1 part spagnum moss
1 part horticulture grade charcoal, fine/medium or aquarium charcoal
2 parts tree fern fiber, course
2 parts fine/course orchid bark

From others experience, I've never heard a case of it breaking down yet, and I know that Pumilo's son, Frogboy has had it in a salamander viv for years and it's in near-perfect condition.
I recently acquired two Fat Tailed Geckos and Eco earth for them. However, their Eco earth needs to be dry, which isn't the case with dart frogs. So I'm going to go with the ABG, which is what those of you who are clearly more experienced than I at keeping these frogs use. What exactly is a hydroton? Egg crate like they use for flourscent lighting? I also saw a fogger for sale at the Reptile Expo, but I could not see anything in the tank, so I'll just stick with misting the vivarium.
 
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