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I shall name it "Nemo"

Does this look like a case of SLS? The froglet gets around fine and is a healthy eater, though it doesn't climb as well as its siblings.


 

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Newbie question here: What is SLS? I gathered that it probably stands for "short leg syndrome"? What causes that, a calcium deficiency?
 

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am so happy to read that a noob is willing to ask a question...props But also would suggest reading previous posts using that specific question...lots of really good information...
 

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He leg does look kind of funny, but I can tell if it's folded or SLS, can someone with a little more experience help me out?
 

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SLS normally does affect the front legs. SLS stands for spindly leg syndrome. The most common reason that is believed to be the cause is leaning towards tadpole development at to high a temperature. I have never sen a case of this with the rear legs. Looks to be just a genetic defect.
 

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SLS normally does affect the front legs. SLS stands for spindly leg syndrome. The most common reason that is believed to be the cause is leaning towards tadpole development at to high a temperature. I have never sen a case of this with the rear legs. Looks to be just a genetic defect.

Where did you get that "fact" about temperature?

For the record, the main cause is not temperature related... The nutritional status of the adults is the primary cause of spindly leg in frogs... poor nutritional status with respect to vitamin A is a primary source of SLS...
One of the old studies back in the 1990s at the Baltimore Zoo was unable to develop SLS in frogs provided the adults had proper nutritional status... this was later confirmed in other studies.
As a side bar excessive phosphate in the water was documented as a causative agent at several institutional collections. Once the phosphate levels were corrected the incidence went back to zero...

It may not be a genetic defect instead it could have been due to a mechanical injury or something else impacting the development....

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Ed
 
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He leg does look kind of funny, but I can tell if it's folded or SLS, can someone with a little more experience help me out?
Hind legs are linked to SLS in some of the literature but in all of the documented studies I'm aware of hindlegs were not involved without the front legs being involved.

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Ed
 

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There are a variety of causes of spindly leg, some we can fix and some we haven't identified. The causes we can fix are temperature of the tadpole water, condition, diet and supplementation in the adults, and the tadpoles diet.

Tadpole water temperature might be the most common source of a problem, the tadpole water should be accurately measured, particularly if you raise your tadpoles without a lid on the container they are in. This can allow evaporative cooling to lower the water temps down to five or more degrees below room temperature. Keep tadpoles water in the mid seventies for best results.

Another common cause of problems is stale food. Vitamins and mineral oxidize out of foods, and then are not available for the tadpoles to use in developing their legs. Flake foods in particular are prone to this, so if you are using flake food, make sure its fresh. Store it in the refrigerator, particularly if you are going to be using the food for more than a few weeks, and buy the food at a store that sells a lot of it.
 

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I dont claim to know everything. Just trying to help out a little. But doesn't look like a mechanical injury. But I am sure someone will point it out if I am wrong. That is not uncommon being a human, and keeping frogs as a hobby and not my living.
 

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Patrick needs to update his website. That information is well out of date and wasn't even well supported to begin with in the literature. If your interested in the history behind SLS in the hobby I suggest checking out Kowalski,Edward; 2007; Spindly Leg Syndrome: A Review; Leaf Litter 1(2):28-31. For where the links between nutrition and SLS were made, back in 2009 and some of the early links were discussed here on the forums... see for example
http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/fo...ient-retinol-embryo-death-sls.html#post321627

Advocation to switch to adding vitamin A to the diet of the adults.... http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/breeding-eggs-tadpoles/59875-sls-question.html#post518458

The primary cause of SLS is deficiency of vitamin A in the egg as this prevents proper formation of the limb buds of the frogs. If you really want to get into the nitty gritty part of the importance of vitamin A in the form of retinol for proper development of anurans, I suggest
Yun-Bo Shi, 1999, Amphibian Metamorphosis: From Morphology to Molecular Biology; Wiley-Liss Press.

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Ed
 

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Is it a good idea to supplement with vitamin A once a month or so even if you aren't having issues with SLS?
Some of the cutting edge vets recommend doing so even if you aren't having issues with SLS or fertility. The reason for this is that a once a month or twice a month additional source of vitamin A in the form of a retinoic acid can help with other problems. People often forget that vitamin A is involved with a wide range of physiological system starting with the immune system all the way through the ability to feed (due to changes of the mucous producing cells) to reproduction.

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Ed
 
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