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Hi All,
Almost every zoo building in which I’ve worked was home to roach (2-3 species) and House Cricket populations. In most, pesticide use was not an option. An older animal keeper whom I befriended let me in on his favorite insect pest control technique – the molasses trap. He was content to let management wonder how he did such a good job so, out of respect for him, I did not share the secret until he retired. Then, for a time, molasses traps became standard in several zoo buildings. Molasses is also useful in outdoor traps, where it never fails to turn up a variety of interesting species. I’ll expand on that below as well. Read article here: Pet-Safe Cricket and Roach Control for Reptile and Amphibian Owners | That Reptile Blog
Comments and questions appreciated.

Thanks, Frank

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Bio: That Pet Place welcomes Zoologist/Herpetologist Frank Indiviglio to That Reptile Blog | That Reptile Blog
 

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Seems there would be some risk to our frogs as well. What depth is the mollasses?
I've used a straight sided tall glass jar baited with just a bit of damp coffee grounds. Crickets and adult roaches can't climb clean glass.
 

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Seems there would be some risk to our frogs as well. What depth is the mollasses?
I've used a straight sided tall glass jar baited with just a bit of damp coffee grounds. Crickets and adult roaches can't climb clean glass.
Hi,

Thanks for your comment...I should have been clearer, these traps are not suitable for use inside terrariums housing small frogs. I used for holding areas, or within exhibit after frogs had been relocated. I favor molasses over other baits because it attracts insect very quickly.

Best, Frank
 
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