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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a message about this in another discussion, but I figured I might post it here to get some more responses. So, sorry if you’re seeing this twice. this is the bromeliad I want to ID, the picture was from a YouTube video by Joshua Turner. In the video he says he doesn’t think it’s a fireball, because it looks a bit too pink. I originally thought it was a fireball but now I see why he thinks that. Any responses would help, thanks!
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The light on the tank is actually white, 6500k, it looks pink in the picture tho. I originally thought it was a fireball, but I think it might be too pink to be. I think it is either a super fireball, or a pink fireball. IMO it’s some type of fireball, it might be one of the species I just mentioned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Here is another picture from a different tank, the one in the center appears to be the same species.
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Oh I assumed each different one was a different species. Im getting annoyed because as soon as I think I find the neorgelia that matches the picture, I find another one that looks exactly like it. “June night” is one of those that i now have to take into consideration.
 

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@Socratic Monologue to be precise, I think a cultivar and a hybrid are two different things. As I understand it, a cultivar has been created by selective breeding within a species and is usually notated Genus species ‘Variety’, and a hybrid is a combination of two (or more, across multiple generations) species and is usually notated Genus ‘Variety’. Maybe this is TMI.

@asteroids You may never find the exact cultivar from that photo, and even if you do it may not be available to buy, and even if it is it may not look the same in your conditions. The color of a plant leaf can be impacted by:
  • Cultivar/hybrid
  • Light temperature (kelvin)
  • Light intensity
  • Nutrients
If it’s a hybrid, color could vary a lot depending on what exact plants the parents were - someone in CA and someone in FL can each make the same hybrid with the same name and come out with two very different plants.

I think your best bet is to see what’s actually available for sale and buy something. They should have pictures up of the actual plants they have for sale so you won’t get as much as variation there, and you can ask them about their lighting and fertilizing situation.

Even without having selective breeding to enhance colors, color can vary from plant to plant. I recently bought a rather expensive terrestrial orchid that I was hoping would have nearly black leaves, but it came with mauve leaves. I contacted the seller to ask if lower light would encourage darker leaves, and they said it would but also they got plants with a decent amount of variation and in future I should request the color I want when ordering - they may or may not be able to fulfill the request. So you can also contact the seller and say “I want the brightest pink plant you have, please”.
 

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@Socratic Monologue to be precise, I think a cultivar and a hybrid are two different things. As I understand it, a cultivar has been created by selective breeding within a species and is usually notated Genus species ‘Variety’, and a hybrid is a combination of two (or more, across multiple generations) species and is usually notated Genus ‘Variety’. Maybe this is TMI.
In common parlance, perhaps, but not if one wants to be precise. The two categories substantially overlap:

-- some cultivars are hybrids (e.g. Neoregelia 'Afternoon Delight': pauciflora (red) X ampullacea)
-- some hybrids are cultivars (as above)
-- some cultivars are not hybrids (e.g. Ficus pumila 'Variegata')
--some hybrids are not cultivars (e.g. Cattleya dolosa, a wild hybrid of C. loddigesii and C. walkeriana)

From the "International Code for the Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants":

1.4. Hybrids between taxa, including, if it is so wished, those arising in cultivation, may receive names as provided in Appendix I of the ICN (“Names of hybrids”; see also Division III of this Code). Alternatively, or in addition, cultivated plants arising through hybridization may be named as cultivars, Groups, or grexes under the provisions of this Code.

sample sections, including the cited one here: International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants, Ninth Edition | International Society for Horticultural Science
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Wow you guys know a lot about bromeliads! I found a plant on a certain website, and it has the nice pink color I want. It might not be the exact same as the one in the photo, but it is pretty similar. For the past month, it’s been out of stock. As the weather starts to get warmer, will that change? Do you think the stock of neos will go up as the cold starts to disappear?
 

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For the past month, it’s been out of stock. As the weather starts to get warmer, will that change? Do you think the stock of neos will go up as the cold starts to disappear?
I'll bet the vendor knows that far better than anyone here.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I emailed them about 2 hours ago. the problem is in the box for the question, they have an “order number” box. I didn’t order from them yet so I suspect they block out the questions without that filled in. This is probably to prevent spam or they only take time to support actual customers.
 

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I ordered from bromeliad.com and got them in February they also had a great selection of broms in stock. However shipping was really quick so I wasn't too worried about them freezing.
 

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That tank is frog dendrozone on YouTube you can check him out and he will probably explain the plants and what tipes of plants he used.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yeah I’m aware. He just called them neoregelias he didn’t mention what type they were
 
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