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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Oh no! Well, it's not good, but I guess it's okay because I'll be tearing down this tank soon anyway. I do want to reuse the plants though, so I guess I'll just have to do my best to sterilize them.

I have a lot of springtails in this tank. If I want to save some and culture them for the next tank, can I do that? Or will nemerteans inevitably tag along if I try to pull some springs? Maybe it's best to just buy a new culture of springs...
 

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anything that you reuse will more than likely spread them to your new tank.. even the plants.


jamie
 

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Re: Nematode?

im still a little confused here but as i understand it and as Ed kindly pointed out to me. nemertean is not at all what we're talking about here. nematodes (which i believe is what you have pictured) and nemerteans are completely different. its a misuse of terms perpetuated on this site by people (like myself) who improperly associated the two.

nemerteans

nematode

james
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I did a little reading up, and it seems you are right. There are a few plants that I really wanted to keep, but if it means not getting nemerteans in the new tank, then I guess I can throw them. If there's anything I can do to keep them though, please someone let me know. They are:
-grub fern
-dischidia ovata
-pleurothallis allenii + a keiki from it
-ludisia discolor

Also I just got two nice orchids that were rather spendy... They are mounted to pieces of wood hanging over the edge of the tank by wire. They weren't touching the substrate, but they were leaning up against the glass, so I guess they could still be contaminated. They were only in the tank for one day. I wonder if there's any way I can save these?

I have a computer fan in the tank I want to reuse too. It just occurred to me that I have already put it in my new tank without attempting to clean it or anything! :O Could that have transferred over any nemerteans?

One more thing. Is this little guy a nemertean too, or just a nematode? It's way smaller than the nemertean I found, you can tell its size because it's next to a springtail in the video.
Dendro :: f001-1.mp4 video by miss_cherry_blossom - Photobucket

Sorry for the deluge of questions!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Re: Nematode?

im still a little confused here but as i understand it and as Ed kindly pointed out to me. nemertean is not at all what we're talking about here. nematodes (which i believe is what you have pictured) and nemerteans are completely different. its a misuse of terms perpetuated on this site by people (like myself) who improperly associated the two.

nemerteans

nematode

james
Sorry James, I posted my most recent comment before I saw your comment here. So, this just looks like a nematode to you? I sure hope you're right! And these nematodes don't kill the microfauna, right?
 

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what im saying is that as i understand it nemerteans are almost entirely comprised of sea dwelling animals, with only a dozen or so terrestrial species.

nematodes are the most numerous multicellular animals on earth. they exist in nearly every environment and that includes our vivs. the majority of these are not parasitic.

now i may be wrong here but this is simply my take on it. ed can probably shed more light on the situation since he is the one that originally alerted me to my misuse of "nemertean"

james
 

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Looks like a nemertean. From my understanding they pose absolutely no risk for your frogs or eggs. In fact, your frogs will happily munch on them.

People don't seem to like them because 1) they're unsightly and crawl on the sides of the glass sometimes, and 2) they are predators that feed on the viv's microfauna.
 

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In all honestly in a pum viv I can see these being a terrible problem for fresh froglets coming out of the water.
 

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I purchased a pum tank along with frogs that had what looks like the same thing only larger, they looked like small red worms climbing on the plants looking for food. I was in shock the first time I saw them. The former owned is a Dr. of entomology at a major university and informed me they were nematodes, he said they pose no harm to the frogs. I've since had multiple froglets grow up in the tank. Probably need a positive ID to alleviate your fear.
Brian
 

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I did a little reading up, and it seems you are right. There are a few plants that I really wanted to keep, but if it means not getting nemerteans in the new tank, then I guess I can throw them. If there's anything I can do to keep them though, please someone let me know.
I guess this is more of a question than a helpful response, but if you wanted to make sure not to transfer these things, are they really that hardy where the standard bleach dip would't be sufficient to sterilize your plants?

Pat
 

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I guess this is more of a question than a helpful response, but if you wanted to make sure not to transfer these things, are they really that hardy where the standard bleach dip would't be sufficient to sterilize your plants?

Pat
There are two different threads discussing this topic at this moment, a lot the questions have been answered here. http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/identification-forum/78350-what.html

What appears to be the most commonly seen species in the hobby is able to make a dessication resistent mucosal cocoon which is probably going to provide protection against the brief dips in a disinfection level of bleach.

Ed
 

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I purchased a pum tank along with frogs that had what looks like the same thing only larger, they looked like small red worms climbing on the plants looking for food. I was in shock the first time I saw them. The former owned is a Dr. of entomology at a major university and informed me they were nematodes, he said they pose no harm to the frogs. I've since had multiple froglets grow up in the tank. Probably need a positive ID to alleviate your fear.
Brian
The most commonly seen species in the enclosures appears to be Argonemertes dendyi See the thread I linked to in a previous post. Nematodes are common in enclosures but these have a different morphology and behavior... And have been recorded predating on invertebrates such as fruit flies.

Ed
 

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Looks like a nemertean. From my understanding they pose absolutely no risk for your frogs or eggs. In fact, your frogs will happily munch on them.

People don't seem to like them because 1) they're unsightly and crawl on the sides of the glass sometimes, and 2) they are predators that feed on the viv's microfauna.
In some cases, the numbers have gotten high enough that people anecdotally report major predation on the fruit flies that were added to the tank for the frogs to the point, that the nemerteans reduced the food availability for the frogs.
They impact more than the intank microfauna.
Ed
 

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In some cases, the numbers have gotten high enough that people anecdotally report major predation on the fruit flies that were added to the tank for the frogs to the point, that the nemerteans reduced the food availability for the frogs.
They impact more than the intank microfauna.
Ed
Do they pose any direct threat to the frogs though? Another member posted a concern for the safety of pumilio froglets.

Would it be feasible to starve the nemerteans to death? In cases like the one that you mentioned where the nemerteans have decimated the microfauna, would it be possible that if you didn't add any additional microfauna into the tank that the population would crash? Or do they undergo some sort of life stage like C elegans dauers where they can essentially "beat" starvation periods until food becomes available again? Or is it unlikely that the nemerteans will exhaust their food supply in the tank?
 

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i have them pretty bad in my juvenile cristobal tank(10gal) and the only problem other then being unsightly is i dont seem to have any springtails breeding intank, I add them every couple weeks, but between 3 frogs and the worms they go quick.

I doubt you could starve them off easily, maybe a tank left in a bone dry environment for years.

Im considering removing all plants and substrate, just leaving the wood background and leaving the tank outside to freeze. Anyone know how cold temps affect nemerteans?

Are the isopods that eat the eggs easily available?
 

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Anecdotal report:

I recently moved my tree frogs from a nemertean infested tank to a new one. In their old tank, there were tons, I mean tons, of microfauna, originally. Especially since the tree frogs weren't eating them. Their old tank has been left alone for a month or so now. You would expect to see lots of microfauna at this point, as the tank is still set up and yummy for springtails and isos. Sadly, the only thing I see moving in that tank is the nemerteans. :(

eta: Their old tank was a recycled tank from previous frogs with previous nemerteans. I cleaned the daylights out of that tank and soaked it in bleach water. The nemerteans survived to infest the tank again.
 
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