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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so my 1.2 variabilis turned out to be a 2.1 (at least i think and hope not a 3.0). the two definite calling males just started staring each other down and calling simultaneously. the third seems indifferent at this point. the two definite males seem on edge but aren't smothering each other or anything as of yet.

What does everyone suggest? signs i should look for to definitely separate? should i get another female to make it a 2.2? would this decrease chances of aggression??
 

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Hi Jessie,

I have kept a 3.0 together for over a year and, while the calling males chase each other around quite a bit, I haven't lost any from stress. I'm sure you would be fine with a 2.1 group.

Take care, Richard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you so much for your advice Richard! I love these little guys and wanted to make sure I wasn't accidentally going to kill one! And I guess it doesn't help that I'm slightly neurotic. lol
 

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Just keep an eye on them. I have seen two males get along fine and ones that kick the crap out of each other. One may start to hide more or lose weight, so you might just watch for any changes and remove one of them if it becomes a problem. But they might be fine.
 

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Agreed, it all depends on the specific attitude of your frogs, its the same in comparison of how some 1.2 groups dont work well cause of egg eaters :(

Edit: Signs of bullying would be the frog not venturing around, losing weight, sometimes if you know a frogs personality, any change can usually be seen immediately.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks everyone. So far they seem more like best buds than competing enemies (and trust me I've been watching obsessively since I saw them both calling next to each other). They are almost always together. Sometimes they are chasing each other, while other times they're just chilling or calling near each other. Pics of them together below.
 

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my imis were doing that one day and rolling around in a ball fighting the next. they were fine until a female was added to the mix. as soon as i saw the wrestling i seperated them. they sound to be fighting for the alpha spot. not all stress is caused by physical contact, just be real careful and watch them. better to seperate being too precautious than to lose a frog. I'm now looking for another female for my relocated male
 

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My advice would depend on whether or not you want them to breed. I have a 2.3 group of variabilis. I started with four sub-adults and then bought a plump proven female. I intended to either keep a pair or 1.2 trio once I could sex them. The problem was that I could never catch the males calling, partly because, like an idiot, I set my viv up near my noisy reef tank, and they are quiet callers. After a while at least one of the younger frogs got plump and I started getting eggs. Not knowing who laid the eggs, I didn't want to mess with them and I never have seen signs of aggression. To date I have 3 morphed froglets, 32 tads in various stages, and 16 eggs developing. They've slowed down a bit, but it seems that when one of the males starts calling, they all have a big frog party and by the end of the day I typically have a dozen or so eggs that, based on appearance, look like 2 or 3 clutches of 4-6 eggs each. The three females are now noticeably larger.

Anyway, with only one female, you might find that the males spend too much time distracting one another and not enough time courting the female.

If breeding is a priority, I'd remove one of the males temporarily and see what happens. You could always purchase another female and pair it up with the second male. If you aren't determined to get tads, and they are getting along, then, as others have said, keep an eye out for weight loss, one of the males hiding, or other signs of stress and enjoy them. I must say that they have really grown on me and they are one of my favorite groups of frogs.

Keep in mind that if you change the dynamic, by adding another female, or removing a male, it might have to be permanent. For example, if you remove one male and the pair becomes bonded you might not be able to re-introduce the male without there being aggression.

Here's a photo of a recent party.

Variabilis on brom axial 1.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the advice. Great picture too. Breeding would be an added bonus, but certainly not a requirement. As of now, my males spend a lot of time together. As we speak, two of my frogs (only one is calling at the moment) are in the brom together like your frog party. The calling male had his forearm on the other frogs back and head for a minute and then turned his back to him/her. The third frog is deep in the next axil. This seems to be the extent of their interactions. I will be keeping an eye out for weight loss.

My advice would depend on whether or not you want them to breed. I have a 2.3 group of variabilis. I started with four sub-adults and then bought a plump proven female. I intended to either keep a pair or 1.2 trio once I could sex them. The problem was that I could never catch the males calling, partly because, like an idiot, I set my viv up near my noisy reef tank, and they are quiet callers. After a while at least one of the younger frogs got plump and I started getting eggs. Not knowing who laid the eggs, I didn't want to mess with them and I never have seen signs of aggression. To date I have 3 morphed froglets, 32 tads in various stages, and 16 eggs developing. They've slowed down a bit, but it seems that when one of the males starts calling, they all have a big frog party and by the end of the day I typically have a dozen or so eggs that, based on appearance, look like 2 or 3 clutches of 4-6 eggs each. The three females are now noticeably larger.

Anyway, with only one female, you might find that the males spend too much time distracting one another and not enough time courting the female.

If breeding is a priority, I'd remove one of the males temporarily and see what happens. You could always purchase another female and pair it up with the second male. If you aren't determined to get tads, and they are getting along, then, as others have said, keep an eye out for weight loss, one of the males hiding, or other signs of stress and enjoy them. I must say that they have really grown on me and they are one of my favorite groups of frogs.

Keep in mind that if you change the dynamic, by adding another female, or removing a male, it might have to be permanent. For example, if you remove one male and the pair becomes bonded you might not be able to re-introduce the male without there being aggression.

Here's a photo of a recent party.

View attachment 19127
 
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