Dendroboard banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all,

Would love to get your thoughts on my current plan. So first the idea.
I want to set up a paludarium for Vietnamese Mossy Frogs.

Some guidelines I want to try to folllow
  • Vivarium is 100*40*90cm (LxWxH)
  • I want full moss growth, so very high humidity
  • Bottom part will be a peninsula surrounded by a body of water. My main priority are the frogs, not having an aquarium
  • I want a waterfall going down from the top to the water feature. I have some pieces of wood that are perfect for this.
  • I want a drip wall to promote moss growth. I have a dart frog setup with just misters and I can't keep the background wet enough for moss to grow., so i need something like this.
Currently I have 2 drawings, 2 with their own pros and cons. Ill list them for both

Setup 1

295383

Pros:
  • I already have a waterfall filter
  • Easy to build
Cons:
  • 1 filter and 2 pumps take up more room
  • Waterfall filter might not be enough (?)
  • More wiring and tubes inside the paludarium
Setup 2
295384


Pros:
  • Stronger filter
  • More room wood/land/etc
  • Filtration and drip wall into 1 system
Cons:
  • More work trying to fit pipes/bulkeads etc
  • Much more expensive
  • Maybe too much force for a drip wall (?)
If anyone has some ideas other than these 2 I would love to hear it! Or let me now if 1 or both wouldn't work at all.
Im thinking the misting might be a bit too much? But mossy frogs like a wet and high humidity setup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
My advice is to dump the drip wall. Its extra equipment you probably don't want to see and the end result is not something you probably want to deal with, namely, algae... a lot of it. Any surface you have water running through you should be able to manually clean algae from. The piece of cork bark you can hopefully use an old toothbrush to clean off. But if you have a wall of moss with water dripping through you basically have a recipe for algae growth with no good way to clean it once it infests the moss. The good news is you don't need water dripping to have moss growth. You need to keep the moss somewhat wet, and you need a LOT of light.

To keep the moss damp you need the misting system (which it looks like you got) and a background that holds or wicks water. Cracked cork mosiac, or hygrolon can work fine for background.

As to which filter system to go with, its dependent on how much water you are filtering. How deep is your water area? I personally lean towards a canister filter because you can always size a filter down but not up. Anyway since you seem to really want a waterfall I would consider making the waterfall the return (if you don't have a lot of water in this tank) and then you only need an intake drilled in the glass and another hole for the waterfall return and no equipment needs to be in the tank itself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
That actually sounds perfect. Then I also don't need the extra pump for the waterfall.
I've been looking at hygrolon, so perhaps thats a better investment instead of a drip wall. Why make it more difficult for myself if it's not needed :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
346 Posts
An alternative to a constant drip wall would be a pump set to a timer to spray the back wall at set intervals with a timer. IMO, I would put the canister to the body of water and skip a waterfall filter. The internal filters like that generally don't help with much filtration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
A drilled setup is more work initially but gives you a lot more filtration options and maintenance will be way easier over time (if you need to do a water change, for example)

If you do go with a drop wall, I'm not sure why you couldn't run both the drip wall and the waterfall off one pump, unless you want to turn them on and off separately? Can control relative flow with Ts and reducers. Again, more versatile and easier to change if external.

Drilling glass is a bit nervewracking if you haven't done it but it's not that bad. Lots of how-tos available and just take your time and be careful about it. Of course the bit is a little expensive.

You can use a cheap plastic tub as a sump too, if you do that rather than a canister filter you have a much larger amount of water available to buffer against sudden water quality changes, as well as additional space for biological filtration.

I think I initially missed that you were thinking of drilling the return input too, that's probably not necessary.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top