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Do you have a necropsy done on your frogs that have perished?

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I was just curious how many of us actually have a necropsy done on our frogs when they pass on to the rainforest in the sky. When someone posts a question looking for answers why thier (insert frog name) died, so many people suggest a necropsy. But I wonder how many of us actually do. The cost of a necropsy on a frog and finding a knowlegeable enough vet is a hurdle. So how many jump this hurdle?
Mike
 

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I tried once but the vet mishandled the specimen and the necropsy couldn't be performed. I would only consider necropsy if I couldn't explain an animal's death. A frog found crispy on the living room floor doesn't require a vet to diagnose for example. I would love to be able to have routine necropsies performed just for data collection though. The recent thread on frognet pointed out that necropsy is the only reliable way to assess coccidia levels since fecals can produce many false negatives for coccidia.
 

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There are a number of ways a necropsy can lose its value one of the most common is the freezing of the specimen. If you are considering getting a necropsy performed then you should find out how the vet wants it presented before you need one performed. (whether they want it pickled or not frozen but on ice).
I think that necropsies on imported frogs are of particular importance given that there is the potential for the introduction of at least pathogen that could eliminate an entire collection (chytrid).

Just some comments and an opinion.

Ed
 

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I have necropsied a few of my frogs. Of course, I also was able to drop them in formalin soon after they died, and had the resources to turn them into slides. Gross necropsy is difficult because they are so small, but preparing full body microscope slides from several cross sections was benefical.
For now, I keep some formalin on hand just in case so I can plunk them in if needed. Luckily I have not needed to in a long time though.
vet_boy77
 

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Does anybody have any semi-affordable methods/people they can recommend that do necropsies on darts?
 

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Well, I haven't had any necropies done on my frogs, since so far only one of them has died from conditions that were anything but obvious. I had a sip that wasted away, but no cash at the time so I couldn't have it done. As for the others, one escaped and got dried out, and the other escaped from another container and got stepped on, both situations were not repeated. I have had one done on a lizard that died, though. I have to say that necropsies are expensive, and it was rather difficult for me to part with $100+ when an answer was not guaranteed. I think if just one frog died, then I wouldn't bother with a necropsy (I take my frogs to the vet when they're sick) but if more than one died, I'd be happy to have a necropsy done.
 

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Cost does vary between vets and pathologists. One of the big differences in costs is whether or not death was obvious on the gross or whether or not histopathology (and or microbial cultures) needs to be performed as the costs of the stains can be expensive. For those that are interested in trying to do some necropsies on their own there are some articles in the old American Dendrobatid Society newsletters but if there are microbial issues performing the necropsy yourself won't help you much.

Ed
 
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