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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello

I just got a Pumilio from a friend and he says it’s the "blue jean". I am a bit skeptical of his understanding though as I think he is a bit slow. He just kept calling it a Strawberry Dart Frog and it wasn’t until I asked if it was a "blue Jean" that he said it was. It looks to me like it is but I'm relatively new to the hobby.

Also is there a scientific name for this morph or is it really just "Blue Jean"? And are there any pumilio morphs that look very similar to the "blue jean"?

Thanks
 

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It can be pretty difficult to know exactly what you have without proper lineage information. The frogs themselves are Oophaga pumilio (which is the species) and the "blue jeans" part is simply a way some people identify red pumilio with blue legs. Some would argue that the term "blue jeans" should only be used to describe red pumilio with blue legs that come from Costa Rica (and maybe some from a neighboring country if I remember correctly).

However, chances are that you have an Oophaga pumilio "mancreek" or "almirante". Pictures are worth a thousand words.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks so much for the help man. I'll shoot a few pic's and see if some of you wonderful experts can help me figure things out.
Thanks again.
 

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Mostly it can be said that Costa Rican and possibly Nicaraguan pumilio with red bodies and blue legs are the Blue Jeans morph, larger than Panamanian pumilio, and smaller pumilio from Panama with red bodies and gray/bluish legs are Almirante or Man Creek morphs
 

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If you want to get crazy technical, Blue Jeans aren't pumilio... they are categorized as Oophaga typographica. Splitting hairs but whatever...
 

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Chances are if he is calling it "strawberry dart frog" which is a generic blanket term for pretty much all pumilo even ones that aren't red, then its probably not a true blue jeans. People who have blue jeans, generally know and make sure to call it that. They are still fairly rare and Its not the kinda frog you end up with accidentally very often. While pics aren't a sure way to identify it many people here can generally tell the difference between true blue jeans and man creek or almirante with a high degree of accuracy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Chances are if he is calling it "strawberry dart frog" which is a generic blanket term for pretty much all pumilo even ones that aren't red, then its probably not a true blue jeans. People who have blue jeans, generally know and make sure to call it that. They are still fairly rare and Its not the kinda frog you end up with accidentally very often. While pics aren't a sure way to identify it many people here can generally tell the difference between true blue jeans and man creek or almirante with a high degree of accuracy.
So I dont really know how to put a link to my new post but its called "NAME THAT PUMILIO!!!" and its loaded with all the info I have and has a few pics so yeah any help would be appreciated.

Thanks
 

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If you want to get crazy technical, Blue Jeans aren't pumilio... they are categorized as Oophaga typographica. Splitting hairs but whatever...
That isn't really broadly accepted. The Europeans agree with this (I don't even know that they agree with it universally), but Americans largely seem to still be using Oophaga pumilio for the whole species (from Nicaragua to Panama, including Escudo). I'm personally skeptical and would err towards pumilio rather than separate species. Given how variable genetic relationships have been shown to be in the species, I don't think that it's wise to separate out the species based on genetics.
 
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