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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Taking advantage of friday's after 5pm for $5 (and a chance to get out of the house for the first time in 2 weeks) I grabbed the camera and took the short trip to NAIB in search of E. tricolor. Never did see any (heard a couple calling in the main exhibit) but managed to snag a couple other decent pics. Here are my two favs:


I'm shocked my camera took such a nice pic of such a small frog! Looks like I'm finally figuring it out. And the camera doesn't even have a macro lense or macro setting :) Not mention its one of my fav frogs!


Not my favorite genus, but I can't help but be proud of this pic. Took it just before my battery died too. Only problem is.... NAIB didn't have terribilis. There was a bicolor lable, and bicolor definately in there (yellows, I got pics of one), but there were also two of these guys, which look like
'mint' or am I just going nuts?
 

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No, they are terriblis, no one has gotten around to changing the sign yet. I teased Justin about it. Those terriblis were just recently added to the display.

Also, the trick to finding the tricolor is going in the day when its bright in the room. Look for the under the second set of steps.

Nice pics btw.

-Richard
 

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Hello all,

The terribilis were recent additions and it seems as though they may be going off display soon. They are just bashing themselves into things; as a result, we have been treating many snout rubs the past few weeks. We may roll out the entire display and put a new one in that I'm working on, but only time will tell what happens.

Anyway, the tricolor are in there and they are easily observed when the lights first come on in the morning.... same with the imi's. Can you believe that there are about 10-15 tricolors in there?

The forest floor is the best spot to see them. Richard gave some accurate directions to their most frequented areas. I have found a spawing site along with a few tads that are about to exit the water.

Justin
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
After working as a volunteer I'm used to seeing them in hidden life and the main exhibit when I used to walk around in the morning and from personal experience they definately are morning frogs. I'm just too cheap to go during the day, lol, plus I don't even get a chance at taking pics of all the wonderful frogs in the back ;) What can I say, I was spoiled as a volunteer.

The camera is a Sony Cyber-shot 4.1 gig which I'm not really fond of, but its better than my personal camera. No special macro lenses were used or anything, and I think these pics were pure luck, especially the terribilis (especially when you consider how many pics just flat out sucked).

I wanna play with Yeager's new camera!
 

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So they have a display containing eyelash vipers and dart frogs. Ive got to see this. Its in Baltimore or where, i dont know. If its in baltimore i can check it out if i go to iad then if i go. Has anyone here owned an eyelash viper, i remember hearing someone had one in viv in their house under padlock. I would enjoy some info on how this works, cause it seems really interesting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
NAIB is short for National Aquarium in Baltimore, and at IAD they actually give tours of the back up areas during the weekend.

They've had an eyelash viper in this exhibit as long as I can remember.... which is about mid-90s when I moved to the east coast. It was unfortunate that the adult female who's been in the exhibit for years is no longer there, but the tank has become home to a new juvie of the same color 'morph'.

This exhibit is home to a mish-mash of pumilio morphs, the eyelash viper, and usually a couple adult female Nephila clavipes (Golden Orb Weavers) and I could see two this trip.

Orb Weaver:


Eyelash Viper:


Pumilio:


Another Pumilio:


This trip made me kinda wish I was still a volunteer there.... but I'd only go back if I actually got to work with the frogs this time instead of the lizards :wink: [/list]
 

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FYI- The old eyelash viper actually died recently. It's mouth was gaping and then it just passed. Upon necropsy, it was found that an adult WC pumilio was in its throat! This is the first time that this has ever happened at NAIB. I preserved the head of the viper for documentation. Simply amazing.


Justin
 

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wow, this is really fascinating and i must see it. So it had a pumilio in it its throat. It had absolutely nothing to do with pumiliotoxin, just aphiaxation (whatever) am i right. I figured the viper wouldnt want much to do with the pums, because they come from similar regions and wouldnt the viper know their toxic. Eyelash vipers are crazy little guys, staying really small i think. To bad i would never in a million years get to have something like this do my extreme snake fear. i also dont know if i could ever step foot in the jungle. I belong here in Indiana where nothing can kill you, no tsunamis, earthquakes, snakes ( in indy), spiders, i think this might be the safest place on earth.
 

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Hold on i just noticed the pumilio stated to be in its throat was wild caught. Im assuming it was in captivity for at least 6 months, so my question is could it have still been toxic or did it just choke the viper. Also andersonni, you work at NAIB dont you. Someone here does right, other than a volunteer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'd seen the green vine snake (she died a while ago) try and eat an auratus... but the eyelash viper?! And she'd been in with pumilio for a loooong time. I'm sad to hear that she's gone, she really was a lovely snake and was the reason eyelashes are my favorite snakes.

While pumilio and eyelash vipers are found in the same areas, they wouldn't be coming in contact with each other nearly as much as they did in the exhibit. Eyelashes are arboreal and don't usually come to the ground much. I never saw a pumilio more than a meter or two off the ground (a level its uncommon to see the arboreal vipers at). And then you have the fact that a pummie isn't even much of a food item because of its size.

I doubt she would have died due to suffication, snakes have a special "breathing tube" near the front of their mouths so that when they are swallowing prey objects, which can take a while, they can breath. "caught in the throat' is a little far back for that to be the reason she died.

At one point I had an orange and green female pummie who had been imported at least 6 years before (never figured out for sure, she had been though a number of owners). She still made my skin tingle when I held her. I personally have no idea where this "6 months' thing came from, none of my WC animals have lost all toxicity, at least not in that time period. Even some captive frogs might have some toxins, such as was found when John G. reported his CB orange terribilis to make his fingers tingle... the rest of the story can be found on frognet ML ;)
 

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I just figured they wouldnt put a frog that they had for less than six months in a exhibit. I have no idea how long it takes for frogs to lose toxicity or the majority of it. I just saw your picture and was curious. When i thought about a snake choking it didnt make sense to me either, so it was the pumiliotoxin that killed the snake or age or what.
 

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andersonii85 said:
FYI- The old eyelash viper actually died recently. It's mouth was gaping and then it just passed. Upon necropsy, it was found that an adult WC pumilio was in its throat! This is the first time that this has ever happened at NAIB. I preserved the head of the viper for documentation. Simply amazing.


Justin
This should be brought up in the mixed species area.
 
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Did the necropsy report on the snakes death happen to mention more about the pumilio frog? Was it bitten or a little crunched?
 
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