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My room has beginning to smell a little bit, probably due to the fruit fly cultures and old tanks, etc.. My mom has been really concerned that I'm gonna get some respiratory disease or something from the "mold" in my room. Has anyone had any problems? I know there probably hasn't been- but my mom has been on my case tonight and wanted me to ask around, and mamma knows best lol

Kasey
 

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First find out what smells... Then get back to us.

Some things I do to keep the smell down:
1. Keep cultures in a cabinet.
2. Do not keep cultures long after they are used up. For small ff's this is about 3 weeks. They really stick when they start to dry out, and the flies have died off.
2. Throw out any dead plants


exclusivehawk said:
My room has beginning to smell a little bit, probably due to the fruit fly cultures and old tanks, etc.. My mom has been really concerned that I'm gonna get some respiratory disease or something from the "mold" in my room. Has anyone had any problems? I know there probably hasn't been- but my mom has been on my case tonight and wanted me to ask around, and mamma knows best lol

Kasey
 
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if you have a problem with loose ff running around, Put beer in a cup or a bottle. This will attract the ff and they will drown in the beer.
 

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Melissa taught me to put a drop of honey in the middle of the culture to eliminate the smell. I don't know why it works but is does. I have usually 10-20 cultures and little or no smell. I think the importent thing to keeping your cages from stinking is ventilation, and changing out the water every week or so.
 

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Honey thats a cool idea. I've been tossing around some new culturing ideas, just have not had time to try them.

bgexotics said:
Melissa taught me to put a drop of honey in the middle of the culture to eliminate the smell. I don't know why it works but is does. I have usually 10-20 cultures and little or no smell. I think the importent thing to keeping your cages from stinking is ventilation, and changing out the water every week or so.
 

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I bought an air purifier for around $25 at Kmart or Wal-Mart, I don not remember and filters are around $10 each. It is Holmes Brand. It is small and does the job. I sleep much harder at night and it really helps with Pollen allergies. I try and keep all the old cultures in the garage until I get around to cleaning them. I bought the air purifier to keep dust and pollen down. It has cut down on the dusting! :D
Later and Happy Frogging,
Jason Juchems
 

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How loud is it? I've been thinking about getting a couple for my house. I used to have one, but it was way too loud and the filters were way overpriced.

JJuchems said:
I bought an air purifier for around $25 at Kmart or Wal-Mart, I don not remember and filters are around $10 each. It is Holmes Brand. It is small and does the job. I sleep much harder at night and it really helps with Pollen allergies. I try and keep all the old cultures in the garage until I get around to cleaning them. I bought the air purifier to keep dust and pollen down. It has cut down on the dusting! :D
Later and Happy Frogging,
Jason Juchems
 
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It may just be your fruit fly mix. Some of my friends use different mixes than me (I use the Eds Fly Meat mix), and their cultures stink! My cultures never smell and produce like champs! It may be worth the extra $ to get them off your case. I wish it was always that easy!
 
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mold and stuff

I'm not sure what your cultures look like but if you have a lot of them and they are growing things other than fruit flies then your mom may have a point in being worried about the impact of mold on your health. In the short term, it's probably alright. I'm thinking that healthy fruit fly cultures shouldn't be producing a lot of mold (yeast maybe). Plus a lot of the premade media includes mold inhibitor. Plus, you should probably get into the habit of chucking the old, nasty cultures anyways since their production is typically shoddy and they attract mites.

If you have a history of asthma or seasonal allergies and you have moldy cultures, then you might want to improve the ventilation in your room or set aside a different room for culturing. Some people develop an allergic reaction to mold spores which can give typical allergy symptoms such as cough, wheezing, etc. Long term exposure can cause irreversible complications such as lung fibrosis. I'm not saying this will happen, this is probably a worse case scenario.

For example, farmers get a disease called farmer's lung caused by prolonged exposure to mold that grows on hay. This disease probably somewhat dependent on the individual and the amount of exposure to the mold. Some can get sick from years of exposure. Others take a few weeks. Chances are you are probably ok. Especially considering that most people make it through college alive and god knows what types of mold are growing in the kitchens and bathrooms of college students. But why take a risk?

So in summary, keep good clean cultures, consider using bought media (I like EDs too, no problems with odor), and maybe use a separate, well ventilated room for your cultures.

Ken
 

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Honey........

bgexotics said:
Melissa taught me to put a drop of honey in the middle of the culture to eliminate the smell. I don't know why it works but is does.
We were speaking to a friend the other day that knows quite a bit about a lot of things. According to him honey has anti-bacterial properties. That may explain why it helps with the smell. To be honest I haven't checked the info myself but I have no reason to doubt him. It makes sense to me......

With mold..... add white vinegar to the mix. I find some times of the year mold will pop up even when you use a mix with a mold inhibitor in it. Adding some vinegar keeps that under control. I know people who use their own mix with no mold inhibitor in it and just use a 50/50 mix of water and vinegar with great success.
 
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Re: Honey........

froglady said:
We were speaking to a friend the other day that knows quite a bit about a lot of things. According to him honey has anti-bacterial properties. That may explain why it helps with the smell. To be honest I haven't checked the info myself but I have no reason to doubt him. It makes sense to me......
Ancient egyptian medical documents actually prescribe coating the dressings of puncture and subdermal wounds with honey to draw out the bacteria. even when they didn't know what bacteria was, they knew how to get rid of it. makes sense to me too =)
 
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