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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking for some threads on Mossy Frog care. Typing “Theloderma corticale” into the search bar mostly brings up classified adds, random pictures and threads that are years old. Anybody know of a good current thread, care sheet, or website that has pictures, and information? I am going to start a new terrarium build tomorrow and want to see what all the cool kids are doing for these frogs. It seems that some people say lots of water in the bottom, some say less. Some use a filter and some dont. Who is the know it all with this frog on Dendroboard?
 

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I've got a pair that have been breeding for me. They are in a 44 gallon pentagon tank. I usually have between 2 and 4 inches of water in there. The young ones seem to like the land more, but the adults will hang around in the water and swim. They also jump to the water if they feel threatened. I'll try and remember to post some pics of my setup tomorrow.
 

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Try your luck in the other amphibian section. This section is mostly for darts. Wish I could help you more.
 

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There are a couple of other links at the bottom on care and breeding.

I have a group of four, they are kept in primarily water with large areas of wood moving in and out of the water. They spend most of their time in the water and pull out to feed. They also spend a fair amount of time hanging on the glass.

Good luck with them, great frogs.

Saurian Enterprises, Inc :: Vietnamese Mossy Frog Theloderma corticale

Deb
 

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This is an old and poor quality pic. If you'd like I'll try and take some tonight when the sun isn't shining in. The water is about 4" and the frogs will put the eggs on the branches or stone going into the water where the eggs will develop and then the tadpoles will fall into the water and develop there. I then take them out once they are almost completely morphed or close.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've got a pair that have been breeding for me. They are in a 44 gallon pentagon tank. I usually have between 2 and 4 inches of water in there. The young ones seem to like the land more, but the adults will hang around in the water and swim. They also jump to the water if they feel threatened. I'll try and remember to post some pics of my setup tomorrow.

Yea, please do. Well, you just did! Thanks! haha
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

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About half of the tank is a waterfall. There is a pump but no filter. There are springtails and plenty of plants that are doing fine on keeping the water quality up. I just looked and they are in amplexus, so maybe by the time I take some clearer pics tonight there will be some new eggs.

These are really some neat frogs. They are easy to care for, breed readily, look interesting, have a beautiful call, and are fairly active for tree frogs. Similar to whites activity level. With a few in there, you should have one doing something all the time.
 

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I'm going to throw in a couple of observations based on breeding this species and others in the genus for the past couple of years:

1) They do not like moving water. As such I would recommend a sponge filter for filtration

2) They produce huge amounts of nitrates and are very susceptible to eye infection which is what if I remember correctly is what wiped out Patrick's(Saurian) breeding group. This problem can be treated with the addition of a turtle sulfa block to the water whenever noticed.

3) I suspect although I have no specific proof that temps play a big role in sex determination and temps above 75 are responsible for producing heavily male skewed ratio

4) Although males will start practice calling at 9-12 months of age maturity isn't reached until the age of 18-24 months and many of the reports you hear of male heavy groups are actually groups of immature calling males and female to young too breed. Patience is definetely a must when attempting to breed this species. On the bright side tads can be raised in the tank with the adults and I have never seen any signs of adult agression to the froglets that have metamorphed in the tank.


Please let me know if there is any additional advice or suggestions I can provide
 

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I've heard about the temp producing males too. Mine are 68-70 hopefully making a more even mix. I read somewhere that these get into some quite cold waters in the wild.

As promised, here is a little better pic. It doesn't have all the reflections at least. The dots you see on the black granite piece on the right and fresh eggs. There are more on the one piece of wood going into the water. Basically the whole section of land is stacked styrofoam with a small pump pumping water up to the top. This creates a small trickle.

 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Very nice! I started building my tank today, it will have a water area as well as a land area. I am going to put in a low flow water feature and a small sponge filter. I will have overhangs for them to be near the water and cork all around for them to blend in. I ordered some EpiWeb because I want to make this a nice looking tank as well as functional. I picked up a 18x18x20something from the super show this weekend when LLL was loading up.
 

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They produce huge amounts of nitrates and are very susceptible to eye infection which is what if I remember correctly is what wiped out Patrick's(Saurian) breeding group. This problem can be treated with the addition of a turtle sulfa block to the water whenever noticed.

I suspect although I have no specific proof that temps play a big role in sex determination and temps above 75 are responsible for producing heavily male skewed ratio
Agreed on both points. I once purchased a group of 6 that all turned out to be males. If you are lucky enough to find some adults, they are fairly easy to sex, however.

I also had issues with eye infections. One frog in particular was treated with turtle drops about every few months it seemed. The drops always cleared the eye up after a few days of treatment in a QT tank.

That being said, they are one of my favorites frogs. After I moved my group, I realized I had gotten so accustomed to their calls at night that I had trouble sleeping without the sound!
 

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I've heard about the temp producing males too. Mine are 68-70 hopefully making a more even mix. I read somewhere that these get into some quite cold waters in the wild.

As promised, here is a little better pic. It doesn't have all the reflections at least. The dots you see on the black granite piece on the right and fresh eggs. There are more on the one piece of wood going into the water. Basically the whole section of land is stacked styrofoam with a small pump pumping water up to the top. This creates a small trickle.

The neat thing about your setup is that you turned the entire land area into one giant sponge filter.
 

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What type of drops do you use to clear up the eyes. One of the frogs I purchased seems to have a misty eye that I want to clear up before he gets put into the finished tank.
I don't use drops. I get the slowly disolving sulfa block that you see in the turtle section of most pet stores and place it in the water area.

I would also recommend against the waterfall idea since Theloderma as a rule prefer stagnant water with very little to no current.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Just about done…

The waterfall is just a water trickle; the water area only has an air pump driven sponge filter and has no visible current to it. All that is left is to let it grow in and get a few more plants. Any other suggestions from you mossy keepers? Also, how long should I wait until I toss the frogs in?

 

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