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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All.

Its been almost 15 days I have started my moss wall. It is a Hygrolon wall with constant waterflow. Temp is between 21-23 degree C. Humidity 90% and more. But I can see hardly any growth in the wall overall. I have used Christmas Moss (Vesicularia montagnei). Is it normal that there will be a dormant period before they pick up the growth or something I am doing wrong?

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In my experience moss is not a fast grower. As long as it’s not going brown you should be ok
 

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In my experience moss is not a fast grower. As long as it’s not going brown you should be ok
Exactly. You're two weeks in. That is nothing. OP - have you looked to see if that species is known for rapid growth?

a dormant period before they pick up the growth
I don't know if this species does "dormant". Maybe it does, maybe it doesn't. Setting aside that word, which has a specific meaning, it is common for a plant that has been moved / divided / repotted / otherwise "bothered" to suffer a period of recalibration or readjustment. Plant people call it transplant shock. Honestly, to my mind that is more a behavior of vascular plants - plants with more advanced tissues that form basically a plant circulatory system.

Mosses, liverworts, clubmosses and such all lack these tissues. I'm not sure / I don't know if they even experience transplant shock (they might be advantaged precisely because they don't have vascular tissues that need to recover from slicing or ripping). The main thing about most mosses I have known is, they are just pretty slow growers. Honestly, your dense grid of large propagules, combined with your cultural approach, is probably the very best way of getting maximum performance from your patch.

If you need to watch something much, much faster, go watch some paint dry, or go watch some grass grow. Ha ha. Really though. Chill out, it's working.
 

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It has been several years since I have followed the planted tank scene but dry start methods for moss walls typically were something like 8 to 9 weeks from what I recall and Christmas moss often used.

Just keep the humidity up and the wall damp and should take over.
 

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I’ve been planting a lot of moss recently and I feel like at about 3 weeks I can see some definite new growth at the edges of planted patches but it’s still pretty minimal. When I say minimal I mean like you gotta stick your face up close to it to notice the tiny new branches on the moss. Like 5 o’clock shadow length type growth.

After about 3 or 4 months you will start be more satisfied with the overall look but it depends how far apart the patches are.

At least that’s been my experience but I don’t use christmas moss and each setup is unique.

I feel like growing moss is the type of thing where you stop looking at it because nothing happens and you just accept it will look that way forever. Then 6 months later you look back at pics from when you planted it and realized how much it grew.

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I’ve been planting a lot of moss recently and I feel like at about 3 weeks I can see some definite new growth at the edges of planted patches but it’s still pretty minimal. When I say minimal I mean like you gotta stick your face up close to it to notice the tiny new branches on the moss. Like 5 o’clock shadow length type growth.

After about 3 or 4 months you will start be more satisfied with the overall look but it depends how far apart the patches are.

At least that’s been my experience but I don’t use christmas moss and each setup is unique.

I feel like growing moss is the type of thing where you stop looking at it because nothing happens and you just accept it will look that way forever. Then 6 months later you look back at pics from when you planted it and realized how much it grew.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
This saves me from a load of frustration. Thanks for sharing the experience.

It has been several years since I have followed the planted tank scene but dry start methods for moss walls typically were something like 8 to 9 weeks from what I recall and Christmas moss often used.

Just keep the humidity up and the wall damp and should take over.
My growing experience fully come from Planted aquariums. Though moss are slow growers, still under water they perform little better. So I was skeptical if I am on right track.

Exactly. You're two weeks in. That is nothing. OP - have you looked to see if that species is known for rapid growth?



I don't know if this species does "dormant". Maybe it does, maybe it doesn't. Setting aside that word, which has a specific meaning, it is common for a plant that has been moved / divided / repotted / otherwise "bothered" to suffer a period of recalibration or readjustment. Plant people call it transplant shock. Honestly, to my mind that is more a behavior of vascular plants - plants with more advanced tissues that form basically a plant circulatory system.

Mosses, liverworts, clubmosses and such all lack these tissues. I'm not sure / I don't know if they even experience transplant shock (they might be advantaged precisely because they don't have vascular tissues that need to recover from slicing or ripping). The main thing about most mosses I have known is, they are just pretty slow growers. Honestly, your dense grid of large propagules, combined with your cultural approach, is probably the very best way of getting maximum performance from your patch.

If you need to watch something much, much faster, go watch some paint dry, or go watch some grass grow. Ha ha. Really though. Chill out, it's working.
After looking at all of your comments, now I am feeling relaxed. In aquarium world, we used to of a dormant phase mainly for the plants which initially have been grown imersed. They take time to transform into aquatic form before start growing.
 
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