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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all, hoping to get some advice on this unfortunate issue. It appears that a bunch of my houseplants have come down with a mosaic virus. Here are some pictures

https://imgur.com/a/Mx52a9A

If anyone can indeed confirm that this is a mosaic virus that would be helpful, I've only had 1 other opinion on it so far.

Its my fault for letting it spread, I'd really never heard of mosaic viruses before so for the past few months when seeing this kind of damage pop up on new leaves I assumed it was insect damage. My plan is to get rid of all the plants currently showing symptoms and carefully monitor everything else until I'm sure I've contained it.

I'm not sure how to approach this with my terrariums though. I have a few setups that I'm confident havent been exposed, but I have 1 in particular that sits right below 2 infected plants that I open regularly to mist. I also have a grow out bin that I unfortunately put a couple cuttings in that may have been exposed. Note that all of these setups are just plants, no frogs or other animals so I can take them down if need be. Any advice for how to approach this or how best to monitor for/contain the virus both in my terrariums and also in general? Im wondering how long I need to watch for symptoms before I can be confident that my remaining plants arent infected. Thank you for any help!
 

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If anyone can indeed confirm that this is a mosaic virus that would be helpful, I've only had 1 other opinion on it so far.
A nearby university may well have a plant pathology lab that does testing for the general public. UW Madison (near me) does, and in the past I've brought samples of landscaping plants in for testing for a nominal fee.
 
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
A nearby university may well have a plant pathology lab that does testing for the general public. UW Madison (near me) does, and in the past I've brought samples of landscaping plants in for testing for a nominal fee.
Thats a good idea, I'll look into that for UCLA and USC. Might be a bit difficult for me at the moment though what with everything else going on in the world. Thanks for the tip!

Edit: Ah looks like LA county will do it, I may give this a go: https://acwm.lacounty.gov/entomology-and-plant-pathology-laboratories/
 

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The likelihood of an aroid having something is high. Think about propagation methods. Hack them up and distribute.

If you continue to expand your plant collection, it’s also likely it will continue. If you can live with it, and exercise hygiene you could continue on.
 

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The likelihood of an aroid having something is high. Think about propagation methods. Hack them up and distribute.

If you continue to expand your plant collection, it’s also likely it will continue. If you can live with it, and exercise hygiene you could continue on.
Could you elaborate on this? I was under the impression that a virus like this would severely stunt the growth and eventually kill any infected plant. All the info I got told me to dispose of any infected plants. My plan was to get rid of everything thats visibly infected and then closely monitor everything else and dispose of things as needed. Thanks!
 

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There are lots of different mosaic virus. The most well known being tobacco mosaic virus, TMV.

Many times you may not be aware. Much like the pandemic we’re in asymptomatic individuals are the real worry. Your plants can continue, like they are, sometimes with the tissues altered like they are or other times asymptomatic. I don’t think their going to succumb to some viral load that’s going to kill the plant.

If you want to expand your collection, expect them to acquire it. Get rid of them, and sterilize any tools and materials that you will reuse. That’s how you’re going to realistically going to avoid this.

In the meantime, I suggest you take it as an experiment. Exercise good hygiene. Do not expose one individual to another’s tissue. This includes you taking off a dead leaf and touching the next plant. Watch what happens to the plants. Practice nutrition if you’re not already and observe for foliage changes.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Oh ok, interesting. Thanks for the advice. I think I'll be proceeding with caution, I'll get rid of some plants and isolate others. I'll definitely be keeping an eye on everything and I wont be bringing in any new plants until I have more of a grasp on whats going on.
 
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