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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I just re-did my viv and mold is beginning to grow under the soil. I was not to concerned about it at first because it was satying in the soil and not spreading. Well now it is beginning to spread on the surface now. I sprayed one area with Methylane blue and then covered it up with fresh soil so the frogs cannot come into contact with it. But now the mold just seems to pop up in another area. Does any one have any recomendations on how to stop the mold growth? Also something wierd is it only grows where my fan blows in fresh air. Very strange.
 
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mold

mold is normal in new vivariums. i recently set min eup and the cocos panels got really moldy but then it just went away. now theres fungus on one of the bits of wood but the springtails eat it.
 
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When I set up my tanks, the first two months I also noticed mold. Especially on the places that aren't moist enough. However after some time it just disappeared and instead moss started growing on those places. So, I shouldn't worry :wink:
 
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Newt said:
I would not be worried about it. It will disappear soon.
As with other members...the same thing happened to my tank and it disappeared within a few weeks. I wouldn't worry to much about it if I were you. One thing for sure, is it gives it a natural look (In my own opinion).
 
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No, usually it should not. I have never had any problem with it. If it is a new set up mold usually appears,but if it is an old set up you better get some ventilation happening :D


Xavier
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all of the help. I was just worried about it becoming a problem with the frogs mainly. As far as ventilation...the mold is actually growing right under the fan that blows in fresh air so go figure. My frogs seems to be fine though so we'll see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I know...I have never seen anything like this before. I think I am going to spray the area with a fungicide like tea tree oil or something.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I did!!!! I have thrown in so many springtails I think I might have an infestation now. (j/k) But really I have dump a lot of those guys in there but the mold seems to spread quicker than they can eat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yeah i think I might do some digging and throw away all of that soil in the area. Spray it down with some water and then rebiuld with fresh soil. I'll keep you posted.
 
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jkinsey said:
I know...I have never seen anything like this before. I think I am going to spray the area with a fungicide like tea tree oil or something.
I honestly think you are overreacting. I get all sorts of molds, fungus, and bizarre mushrooms in my vivariums and I don;t lose any sleep over it. Don't worry about it. I would be more worried about what the fungicides would do to my frogs than the fungus.

Don't forget.. dart frogs come from the rainforest, and there are countless sorts of fungi down there, especially in the leaf litter where our frogs reside. Many of which that are far more bizarre than anything that will grow in a vivarium. The frogs are built to deal with them, and the fungi are an unavoidable part of any soil.
 

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I agree with Homer. Mold and other fungus is a natural part of the vivarium maturation process. When you set up a vivarium, you are creating perfect conditions and a new food source for fungus to grow. Any attempt to rid the vivarium of the mold only sets the maturation process back. I would leave it alone and let it run its course... and enjoy the show while it lasts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Very true about the fungus being prevelant in nature, the only problem is my frogs are not in nature. They are in a 40gallon tank. So there is no way they can get away from the fungus like they can in nature. In nature they are also very toxic, which is said to help with battling certain infections and fungus. Just my 2 cents on the deal. I appreciate the help though. Thanks, Josh
 

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jkinsey said:
Very true about the fungus being prevelant in nature, the only problem is my frogs are not in nature. They are in a 40gallon tank. So there is no way they can get away from the fungus like they can in nature. In nature they are also very toxic, which is said to help with battling certain infections and fungus. Just my 2 cents on the deal. I appreciate the help though. Thanks, Josh
The fact of the matter is that they can't get away from fungus in nature either, none of us can. You are breathing in fungus spores right now. Most fungi are beneficial. They are an important part of the nutrient cycling process. If you don't have fungus and bacteria in your vivaria, then you have big trouble. Think of it this way, if you throw a box full of cornflakes out your back door, something is going to eat those cornflakes. Some of the things that come to eat the flakes may not be desireable. Some things might be okay except the cornflakes have attracted too many of them and they become a nuisance. But when the corn flakes are gone, all those critters will go away, either starve themselves out or just leave looking for food elsewhere. When you set up a new vivarium, it is like dumping a box of corn flakes in a glass box. You have to let the fungi, bacteria, and invertebrate populations adjust to the levels of nutrients that are available so they can settle down into a stable system. Removing the fungus only means that bacteria populations will have to grow even more to take up the slack. If you have nutrients available, something is going to eat them. By allowing the fungi and bacteria to reach a "balance" (it's not really a balance), you create a population of hungry decomposers that are ready to rapidly break down frog poop and dead insects before they have a chance to build up toxic nitrogen levels in the vivarium.
 
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