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Small fish will work well with the redeyes. I think you can be pretty sure (I know thats an oxymoron) that the frogs won't eat your fish. I used to have zebra danios in the pond portion of a Polypedates dennysi tank and they were quite useful. They kept the water pretty clean and the dennysi's (which are much more aggressive feeders than redeyes) never messed with them. There are bunches of tropical fish that would work, white clouds, guppies, danios, even rasboras. Also, the redeyes shouldn't produce any skin secretions that would hurt the fish, which is a problem with people who put fish in with Bombina species. I also had some goldfish in with my common snapping turtle, they were supposed to be food but they turned into janitors, worked out great. @Averhoeven: I know this is divergent from your original idea, but it should work and might be pretty cool.
Just a thought. Many tropical fish commonly available in pet stores are bred in very unsanitary conditions in large industrial farms in the Far East. They come in with a myriad of health problems and can be a possible vector of disease to amhibians that have access to the same water as they do. Has anyone considered this posibility when recommending fish as possible companion animals. My suspiscion is that they would actually be worse as disease vectors than cb frogs recieved from a reliable source.
 

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I didn't even think to include anything about disease transmission. Yes the SE Asian fish farms can be really disgusting, but many are actually pretty high tech (excluding the Tilapia farms, google it if you wanna be grossed out). The zebras I used were healthy ones that I had already had for 6-8 months. I think it would be a good idea to keep any fish in a q tank for at least a couple of weeks, especially neons which can be wc.
 

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First off let me say I am sorry...I did not realize my caps lock was on until I posted my message.
Yes I have had experience with keeping smaller daytime living frogs with my red eye tree frogs. It has never worked out! Like it has been posted here they do love their peace and quiet during the day and do not like to be bothered. Smaller day loving frogs like darts are exploring all day for food and upset the red eyes. My red eye females as adults like now are a good 3.5 inches and have at night seeked out their food until I started bowl feeding. The crawled into caves and under logs at night chasing crickets and then decided to dine on my tins. Not a problem at all for them to eat a tinc. At one time I even tried to rescue a green sip female bas had no success.
Crickets even if fed well left loose in a terrarium can be vicious to a dart frog at night. I have had them eat my darts legs off before. All this had taken place in a very well planted 120 gallon terrarium.
Humidity and air flow was not such a big factor of not doing it for me. Both types of frogs can adapt to slight variances of each one way or the other.
I hope this helps some. My typing skills suck and I think much faster than my fingers move.
I never meant to offend no one here with what I first posted on this thread. Just some advice.:)
 

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p.s.
I have had much better luck keeping fish in with my red eyes than I have with any other type of frog. I have never had any of my red eyes try and eat a fish!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 · (Edited)
First off let me say I am sorry...I did not realize my caps lock was on until I posted my message.
Yes I have had experience with keeping smaller daytime living frogs with my red eye tree frogs. It has never worked out! Like it has been posted here they do love their peace and quiet during the day and do not like to be bothered. Smaller day loving frogs like darts are exploring all day for food and upset the red eyes. My red eye females as adults like now are a good 3.5 inches and have at night seeked out their food until I started bowl feeding. The crawled into caves and under logs at night chasing crickets and then decided to dine on my tins. Not a problem at all for them to eat a tinc. At one time I even tried to rescue a green sip female bas had no success.
Crickets even if fed well left loose in a terrarium can be vicious to a dart frog at night. I have had them eat my darts legs off before. All this had taken place in a very well planted 120 gallon terrarium.
Humidity and air flow was not such a big factor of not doing it for me. Both types of frogs can adapt to slight variances of each one way or the other.
I hope this helps some. My typing skills suck and I think much faster than my fingers move.
I never meant to offend no one here with what I first posted on this thread. Just some advice.:)
Thanks. This, combined with the cricket problem, is the kind of feedback I was looking for based on experience and reasoning. The tincs will most likely stay in their own tank (they've liked it for the past year). It would have all been dependent on the final product anyway as I'm not sure how much ground will be left after planting anyway. It was all just theory in case it was feasible as the idea seemed really neat in my mind.

If nothing else, combining the two to pare down tanks (darts + fish tank gone with shelving to hide the spider) would have simply made the RETF tank more palatable for the lady friend ;) As always, they tend to be intervening element!

**PS: As you can probably tell from the preceeding line, the tetras have been with me for almost a year at this point. I am simply moving them to clear out a tank so no worries about disease.
 

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That's more than I would be comfortable with for red eyes too, they are not the strongest swimmers.
I've kept RETFs over deep pools for over 16 years with good longeviity (over 8-9 years for some of the frogs and averaging 6+). They do just fine as long as they can get a grip on the sides to climb out. I have even seen them dive to the bottom and wedge under decorations and hide there for 5 or more minutes before surfacing.
 

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I've kept RETFs over deep pools for over 16 years with good longeviity (over 8-9 years for some of the frogs and averaging 6+). They do just fine as long as they can get a grip on the sides to climb out. I have even seen them dive to the bottom and wedge under decorations and hide there for 5 or more minutes before surfacing.
Good to know. My observation of red eyes and deep water has been limited to rain chambers, maybe the walls are just too slick in that type of setup.
 

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Good to know. My observation of red eyes and deep water has been limited to rain chambers, maybe the walls are just too slick in that type of setup.
Were they glass sided?
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 · (Edited)
It's not a full 7" of water all the way around. The water is mostly completely below the land. Think of it as a really high false bottom.
There is about a 4-5" gap at the front between the front glass and the land so there is some exposed water, but I designed the edges to be easy to get out of with fake tree buttress roots, etc leaving the water. In addition, I want to place some surface plants in that area for both looks and in case.

Here's a quick mock-up where I tossed in the main pieces while the silicone finishes curing to give you a better idea:
Early Mock-up.jpg
 

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Rob mentioned "bowl feeding". Is this possible with the RE's? The male in the tank seems more interested in trying to get out of the tank than eating. He is getting pretty thin. He seems kind of dominated by the female.
 

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Rob mentioned "bowl feeding". Is this possible with the RE's? The male in the tank seems more interested in trying to get out of the tank than eating. He is getting pretty thin. He seems kind of dominated by the female.
Yes, it is possible and does work well, you just have to monitor it for awhile to make sure that they figure it out. I used a cup like those used to hang in bird cages for seed or water. They will learn to feed out of it and it reduces the number of crickets drowning in the water.

Ed
 

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Yes, glass sides with potted plants and 2-3 inches of water at the bottom.
It is possible that on occasion if they get too panicked they may not get a grip as easily on the glass. When I kept them over water, three of the sides were fiberglass and there was a large branch extending out of the water and they were able to readily get a grip on those items.

Ed
 

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It is possible that on occasion if they get too panicked they may not get a grip as easily on the glass. When I kept them over water, three of the sides were fiberglass and there was a large branch extending out of the water and they were able to readily get a grip on those items.

Ed
That was the case, if they fell in the water they would swim around in an apparent panic until they found a vine or pot to climb out on, they did not seem to be able to grip the glass when wet.
 

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Rob mentioned "bowl feeding". Is this possible with the RE's? The male in the tank seems more interested in trying to get out of the tank than eating. He is getting pretty thin. He seems kind of dominated by the female.
Since I have several Red eyes in one large terrarium I use more than one bowl to feed. I have done this at night of course not much after lights off and they have learned very of this. Usually they are lined up and waiting for me as soon as lights are out ready to feed. With more than one bowls all usually get a share.
Since your male is getting thinner you may want to house him alone temporarily and make sure he is eating or even try feeding him with tongs. Just a suggestion.
 

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I have a mixed species tank, but I don't have dart frogs in there. Red eyes, several small day geckos, anoles, and a jackson chameleon. All have similar requirements.
Parasites are not so much of a problem with all CB animals.

And for the record, I built the tank in 1994. So, It has been running for 17 years.

And I have had a vert enclosure since 1998 with Auratus and imis. It is 5 feet tall which is why I was comfortable with this decision. And all CB. I would of never considered this 20 years ago, but most of the frogs sold in the early 90s were all WC.
 

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Thks I'll give the feeding dish a try. Not sure how high the sides of the dish needs to be to keep the cricks in but I will experiment. As for separating the little guy, I think he is doing okay, but am watching him closely.
 

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I use to keep a group of RETF with my leuc. They were in at vert. I put the crickets for the red eyes in tall plastic see through cups and feed the leuc with fruit flies. It was a custom build viv so the top 1/4th was screen and bottom was a water feature area i filled with cherry shrimp. It worked really well for the frogs and shrimps. I had a small ficus tree and some bambo in there where the red eyes sleep. I no longer have this because i moved and sold them all. just want to let you guys know that it can be done.
 
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