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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know that it's generally frowned upon to mix species, but this is usually to prevent inter-breeding. There's no way Tincs and RETFs would interbreed. Their habitats are similar, they would use completely different parts of the terrarium, the tincs are big enough I don't think the RETFs could eat them, etc. Is there any reason I can't put a pair of tincs in my RETF cage?
 

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Darts in general require higher humidity than the red eyes and the red eyes will require more airflow than most of the stagnant air setups of darts. Also the crickets for the red eyes could feed upon the darts as they sleep. So it's best to keep them separate.
 

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You really should do a search on mixing before posting. Posts on mixing will NEVER be met with open arms here. You are trying to mix frogs that have different requirements. Besides the fact that you will be exposing both sets of frogs to possible diseases and "bugs" that they have absolutely no natural defense against.
 
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The higher humidity of a tinc tank would become a problem for your redeyes (a bacterial infection most likely). I have my redeye in with other conspecifics like Phyllomedusa tomopterna and Dendropsophus marmoratus (all c.b. by the same breeder). If you feel that you have to mix, keeping it to similar species will be much easier. Not only will you have better luck, your animals will be much happier!
 

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Assuming both sets of frogs are CB you shouldn't see any real problems. I keep Black Eye Tree Frogs in a mixed tank with my Citronellas, Orange Terribs and Super Tiger Leg tree frogs and the only problems I have seen have been as follows:

1) The heavier weight of the black eyes tends to crush many plants
2) Unless I feed crickets right before the lights go out the Terribs tend to consume all the crickets meant for the tree frogs.

I would agree with the statement that red eyes probably do need more ventilation so I would recommend leaving a portion of the top screen if you choose to go this route.
 

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I KEEP BOTH TYPES OF FROGS AND I WOULD NEVER NOR WOULD I EVER RECOMMEND TO ANYONE TO KEEP BOTH SPECIES TOGETHER!!! THEY ARE NOT ALIKE IN ANY WAYS!!! NOT A GOOD IDEA!!!:eek:
 

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I KEEP BOTH TYPES OF FROGS AND I WOULD NEVER NOR WOULD I EVER RECOMMEND TO ANYONE TO KEEP BOTH SPECIES TOGETHER!!! THEY ARE NOT ALIKE IN ANY WAYS!!! NOT A GOOD IDEA!!!:eek:
Is there a particular level of personal experience you would base that statement on? The fact that they are no alike in any way would actually be beneficial since they wouldn't compete for space, food or any other resources. In fact with the dart being durinal and the tree frogs being nocturnal their paths wouldn't even cross except in rare instances.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Is there a particular level of personal experience you would base that statement on? The fact that they are no alike in any way would actually be beneficial since they wouldn't compete for space, food or any other resources. In fact with the dart being durinal and the tree frogs being nocturnal their paths wouldn't even cross except in rare instances.
See... this kind of thinking is where I am. All the other posts so far seem to be gut reaction "don't mix them" without really giving me great reasons why. The tincs
Already have their own cage and have for a year. I was just thinking the environments are similar, the cage is bigger, there would be minimal competition for space or food and it might be neat. I was looking for whether there were any logical REASONS why I couldn't, not just all caps postings that say "i would never" without an explanation.

I acknowledge that 2 of the posts have given hints of reasons that I am considering. It was purely a planning question. There is a ton of knowledge and experience here that I was hoping to invoke.
 

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Is there a particular level of personal experience you would base that statement on? The fact that they are no alike in any way would actually be beneficial since they wouldn't compete for space, food or any other resources. In fact with the dart being durinal and the tree frogs being nocturnal their paths wouldn't even cross except in rare instances.
My major concerns would be the red eyes need for ventilation conflicting with the tinc's need for humidity, and the crickets for the red eyes stressing out the tincs. I could see it possibly working out if the tank was large enough to create the appropriate microclimates and the red eyes were trained to bowl feed, but it seems to me that a small hylid like D. ebraccatus would be a better choice to try with darts.
 

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See... this kind of thinking is where I am. All the other posts so far seem to be gut reaction "don't mix them" without really giving me great reasons why. The tincs
Already have their own cage and have for a year. I was just thinking the environments are similar, the cage is bigger, there would be minimal competition for space or food and it might be neat. I was looking for whether there were any logical REASONS why I couldn't, not just all caps postings that say "i would never" without an explanation.

I acknowledge that 2 of the posts have given hints of reasons that I am considering. It was purely a planning question. There is a ton of knowledge and experience here that I was hoping to invoke.
Here is a reason, don't RETF's eat quite large crickets? I'm asking because I don't keep tree frogs, but am pretty sure they eat decent size crickets. Well tincs can't eat the size of food that tree frogs eat. So the crickets could possibly hurt the tincs..
 

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My major concerns would be the red eyes need for ventilation conflicting with the tinc's need for humidity, and the crickets for the red eyes stressing out the tincs. I could see it possibly working out if the tank was large enough to create the appropriate microclimates and the red eyes were trained to bowl feed, but it seems to me that a small hylid like D. ebraccatus would be a better choice to try with darts.
Shoot sorry Tony, I didn't see you already talked about crickets in your post until I posted mine.
 

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My major concerns would be the red eyes need for ventilation conflicting with the tinc's need for humidity, and the crickets for the red eyes stressing out the tincs. I could see it possibly working out if the tank was large enough to create the appropriate microclimates and the red eyes were trained to bowl feed, but it seems to me that a small hylid like D. ebraccatus would be a better choice to try with darts.
If the tanks has a height of at least 2' you can create microclimates where there would be a fair bit of ventilation at the top but more humidity at the bottom. I actually believe that we tend to keep darts more humid than they would see in nature on a year round basis so more ventilation may actually be of benefit.

As for the criket issue that could be a potential danger but in a well planted tank the crikets aren't likely to bother the darts although the plants could well take a beating. Most issue I have seen or heard about with crickets nibbling on frogs or lizards have been in tank with little or no vegetation, where starving and dehydrated crickets had nothing else to turn to for food and moisture.
 

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First-- put your hardhat on because mixing threads always cause explosions here.

I knew someone with a 125 gallon vivarium with a mixed morph group of auratus (he never bred them though, only for display) and a female RETF. He gave the RETF prekilled crickets fed on forceps. I don't have as much of a concern about the crickets as I do if the tincs would bother the RETF during the daytime. Tincs I have owned DO like to climb, and I can see a RETF getting pretty irritated from tincs' hyperactive antics.

About humidity, I'm getting to the point where I ventilate my dart frogs more than was ever recommended when this hobby was "younger" based on personal experiences and reading current information.

While I personally do not mix frogs, I know several experienced hobbyists (notice, I said EXPERIENCED) that do it successfully. I'm not trying to be rude to the OP, but to be blunt and honest-- usually if you're asking if you can mix x with y, you haven't had enough experience with either x or y to make the decision. I even asked questions like this myself on here long ago.

They're your frogs, not mine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If it helps, the tank is a 47g column paludarium that I am constructing for the retfs. The fact that there is about 7" of water beneath the elevated land area makes me think there would be significant variation in humidity top to bottom. Like I said, just thought it would make for a more interesting tank having critters that are active on different cycles.

As for the crickets, it is something I hadn't thought of and is a good example of why I'm asking. Constructive feedback is helpful. Asking questions and asking people to defend their answers instead of just taking it on faith helps everyone learn. This forces us to give solid reasoning to our assumptions which may show exactly how right, or wrong, they are.

I realize there's thread after thread about mixing... I've read them. I was trying to think out loud sharing my thoughts and have them bounced off people with additional experience. That's the benefits of forums like this in theory... in practice there's often a huge amount of groupthink going on. I REALLY noticed this on the reef forums I used to frequent back in my reefing days.
 

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imo another problem is if you start off with larger RETF's and smaller Tincs couldnt the RETF's predate on the Tincs i know some tree frogs in the wild predate on other tree frogs and other frogs in geneeral
-scotty
 

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I have a big RETF. She is about 3.5 inches and if you determine food size by the space between her eyes, most small darts are definitely prey. They also don't like to be disturbed while they sleep, they get jumpy and they jump along way. Mine like to sleep in the open too so they would be vulnerable to daytime activity. It would be interesting to set up an environment where you would have an ecosystem. You could construct a jungle with snakes and ants and mosquitos and real fruit flies and monkeys and maybe a jaguar. Maybe safer to visit and bring back pictures....
 

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I think already by saying there's 7" of water at the bottom that its not suited for tincs. While mine do climb frequently, they still prefer more terrestrial space and a tall tank with a big pond wouldn't be to their liking.

What about putting tropical fish in the pond area instead? I don't know if the RETF would eat them or not, depending on what you put in, but it'd probably be a safer idea compared to a tinctorius.
 

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I think already by saying there's 7" of water at the bottom that its not suited for tincs. While mine do climb frequently, they still prefer more terrestrial space and a tall tank with a big pond wouldn't be to their liking.

What about putting tropical fish in the pond area instead? I don't know if the RETF would eat them or not, depending on what you put in, but it'd probably be a safer idea compared to a tinctorius.
That sounds like a really good idea. I would also suggest this. It could end up looking pretty nice! And you wouldn't have to worry about any of those possible problems with tincs and RETFs together.
 

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Small fish will work well with the redeyes. I think you can be pretty sure (I know thats an oxymoron) that the frogs won't eat your fish. I used to have zebra danios in the pond portion of a Polypedates dennysi tank and they were quite useful. They kept the water pretty clean and the dennysi's (which are much more aggressive feeders than redeyes) never messed with them. There are bunches of tropical fish that would work, white clouds, guppies, danios, even rasboras. Also, the redeyes shouldn't produce any skin secretions that would hurt the fish, which is a problem with people who put fish in with Bombina species. I also had some goldfish in with my common snapping turtle, they were supposed to be food but they turned into janitors, worked out great. @Averhoeven: I know this is divergent from your original idea, but it should work and might be pretty cool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I was already planning on having a school of neon tetras in the water portion. It's not so much a pond as a 12g "tank". The land portion is on stilts that sits above the water portion with a small opening towards the front of the tank.
 
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