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howdy all,
i was wondering if mistking was the only misting system available? I had the dendro rain from azdr in the past and so i would like that same style again. thank you!
 

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I have used Rainmaker and Mistking. I would never, in a million years, go back to Rainmaker.
So, in my mind, Yes, Mistking is the only mister!
 

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What about hand misting? I have been just doing that since I was a youngin'.
 

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Automated misting makes a big difference in time expenditure in larger setups (not to mention it misting while you're away), and also is aesthetically pleasing, since you can sit back and watch it mist. Frogs that tend to pop out when you're misting may also be more likely to do so if your hand is not in the tank waving a big metal stick around. I also imagine the mist tends to be a bit finer, but that may depend more heavily on the quality of hand-mister I've dealt with in the past than anything.
 

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I have a Pro Mist system that I bought for my Veiled Chameleon, and it works flawlessly! I havent tried the Mistking but when I was researching misters they both seemed to be of equal quality. Hope this helps! Here is their website. I have the PM-50 kit.

Pro-Products | ProMist

Mark
 

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With a large number of tanks we find that controlling the climate and humidity of the entire frog room to be important. That way tanks can have lots of ventilation and they only need a small amount of occasional misting. We use our mist king to mist our entire room and not individual tanks.
 

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Automated misting makes a big difference in time expenditure in larger setups (not to mention it misting while you're away), and also is aesthetically pleasing, since you can sit back and watch it mist. Frogs that tend to pop out when you're misting may also be more likely to do so if your hand is not in the tank waving a big metal stick around...
CVB, I eventually do plan to get an actual misting system for my 125. In the mean time however I use a pressurized hand mister. Works well, fine mist etc. I rarely go anywhere far away so that's never an issue. It's just easier for me since my Pixie needs to be sprayed periodically. However what you said about the frogs is 100% true, my tincs are used to it now but they used to get freaked out.
I am guilty of always wanting to do everything DIY, that being said. You wouldn't happen to know anything about a DIY mister would you?
 

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I haven't encountered a DIY mister that performed as well as a commercial product at a level of cost and effort that I felt was worthwhile. Usable diaphragm misting pumps can be be acquired new for $100 or less and are very good at what they do. I am a huge fan of building everything I can myself, from glasswork to plumbing to electrical, but I would find myself purchasing a standard misting pump the same way I use off the shelf gear for water circulation. The off the shelf part is inexpensive and nearly perfect technology.

Aside from the pump itself, however, I think buying all the tubing and fittings separately and assembling a system to your spec is the way to go, assuming it is affordable. Until we get a wholesale deal arranged with our fitting supplier I'd probably get the MistKing parts simply because they're cheaper (or so close as to not be worth the effort) than our cost to put together ourselves. I believe he uses pretty standard Legris fittings and Tefen nozzles, as Tony has pointed out in other places, but offers them at a pretty solid price.

Not that it would dissuade me from piecing out my own kit myself just for the hell of it.
 

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I haven't encountered a DIY mister that performed as well as a commercial product at a level of cost and effort that I felt was worthwhile. Usable diaphragm misting pumps can be be acquired new for $100 or less and are very good at what they do. I am a huge fan of building everything I can myself, from glasswork to plumbing to electrical, but I would find myself purchasing a standard misting pump the same way I use off the shelf gear for water circulation. The off the shelf part is inexpensive and nearly perfect technology.

Aside from the pump itself, however, I think buying all the tubing and fittings separately and assembling a system to your spec is the way to go, assuming it is affordable. Until we get a wholesale deal arranged with our fitting supplier I'd probably get the MistKing parts simply because they're cheaper (or so close as to not be worth the effort) than our cost to put together ourselves. I believe he uses pretty standard Legris fittings and Tefen nozzles, as Tony has pointed out in other places, but offers them at a pretty solid price.

Not that it would dissuade me from piecing out my own kit myself just for the hell of it.
Umm, yeah. What he said! Except the last sentence.
 

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I think that you are probably right, but I came up with a crazy idea. Here's a schematic that I came up for it. Possibly may work, but maybe not enough pressure.


Basically the powerhead/ pump would be set up to timer for whatever times. The hose would have and air tight seal between the lid. The hose would go up to some kine of spray bar. I tube with spray nozzles connected to it or something like that.... maybe i'm trying to hard to come up with something.
 

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You can do that to create a drip system, but it will be unable to produce a fine mist. Mist requires pressurized water forced through a fine nozzle. Pressurizing water in that way, for small scale hobby purposes, generally requires a diaphragm pump like what MistKing sells (or a RO booster pump, for example). Drip systems can work well for watering plants like orchids hanging on porous media, but I don't think they're ideal for general frog purposes.

Also, if the system was truly air tight, the depressurization of the air space above the water would eventually overcome the pump's ability to move water, in effect continually increasing the effective head height the pump is working against as the water level inside drops. Plumbing is fun!
 

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Yeah that's something like what I was thinking, idk was worth a shot i guess.
 
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