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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A while ago i found a few millipedes in my auratus viv. I removed them, no biggie. Now there are 20+ crawling around the viv. The ones last week must have mated.
How do i get rid of them? The auratus are breeding and i want to keep any eggs safe.
These seem to be common garden millipedes.
 

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Ugh! I hate those! Some people have used CO2 to gas the tank. I'm not sure if any were totally successful. Here's a link to a thread about DIY CO2. http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/care-sheets/57367-building-using-co2-generator-2.html#post497332

If it was me, I'd run out to PetCo and get a 10 gallon tank to set up for them, temporarily, then I tear down their tank, sanitize, toss the substrate and anything else a millipede can hide eggs in. I'm not one to play games with millipedes. HATE THEM! :mad:
 

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When I was a kid I used to have tea parties with millipedes,(they were the tea) there were easily hundreds of them in the basement where I played. The little brown ones about an inch long.

I don't recall ever getting bit by one. I guess I have always had a hard time understanding the danger in those little guys.
 

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Millipedes typically come into the tanks via soil (around the roots of plants for example) or from inside wood that was collected and used. It is also possible for them to hitch a ride in leaves that aren't well dried before adding them to the enclosure.

Millipedes usually don't bother the eggs, however they can be an issue for tender plants. Some people choose to wait them out as the population typically booms and busts over time (but this can take more than a year).

It should also be noted that some millipedes are found in the diet of D. auratus (see Cuadernos de herpetología - Trophic and microhabitat niche overlap in two sympatric dendrobatids from La Selva, Costa Rica )

Ed
 

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I don't see why the frogs wouldn't eat them especially the small ones. Kind of a hard exoskeleton. They could be unpleasant to look at...
 

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I don't see why the frogs wouldn't eat them especially the small ones. Kind of a hard exoskeleton. They could be unpleasant to look at...
That and the medium term damage they do by feeding on plants typically makes people more interested in eliminating them.

Probably the best method would be to pull the frogs and CO2 the tank for several days followed by another round 2-3 weeks later to see if that did the job.

Ed
 

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I've been reading a bit about co2 bombing. (never hurts to be prepared) and I always wonder... Once everything is dead, do you pick out the dead bugs you can see? Or let them decompose and fertilized your soil?

Sent from my ADR6300 using Tapatalk
 

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I've been reading a bit about co2 bombing. (never hurts to be prepared) and I always wonder... Once everything is dead, do you pick out the dead bugs you can see? Or let them decompose and fertilized your soil?

Sent from my ADR6300 using Tapatalk
Let them rot...

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
UPDATE: Got a good look at some hand-removed ones and there are actually two species- a small brown spirobolid 1-2 cm long and a larger polydesmid about 3 cm long.
 
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