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Discussion Starter #1
Anybody notice that Marcgravia 'small round' more mature foliage is niether "small" nor "round"? The cup on top is a couple of cuttings that I took a few days ago. The bottom cup is the mother plant with the evolved growth form. What is DB's observations with this plant?
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I have "round leaf" and I assume that's the same thing. I can verify the same behavior in mine. It grows with little round leaves at first then as it gets farther away from the nearest roots, it changes to look a whole lot like rectifolia.

Mark
 

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Greetings,

That transition is just the start: Mature fronds are 2 feet long and have leathery leaves with no shingling habit at all. These grow in pendant fashion and eventually form an insane chandelier inflorescence designed to present the flowers to pollinating bats. (Hummingbirds feed on the nectar too but the flower design doesn't work as effectively to recruit them as pollinators.)
 

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Slightly unrelated to your post topic - what is your grow out setup? I’m getting a shipment of plants soon and am looking forward to making some cuttings once they’re established.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have "round leaf" and I assume that's the same thing. I can verify the same behavior in mine. It grows with little round leaves at first then as it gets farther away from the nearest roots, it changes to look a whole lot like rectifolia.

Mark
I assume it's the same. Got mine from Glass Box and that's what I purchased it as so that's what I call it now. Don't really have a problem with the "new" look. Just wasn't expecting it and haven't seen it talked about before.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Greetings,

That transition is just the start: Mature fronds are 2 feet long and have leathery leaves with no shingling habit at all. These grow in pendant fashion and eventually form an insane chandelier inflorescence designed to present the flowers to pollinating bats. (Hummingbirds feed on the nectar too but the flower design doesn't work as effectively to recruit them as pollinators.)

Would love to see one like that in the wild. I know they will never fully mature in our vivariums, but still would love to see one in it's full glory.
 

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Slightly unrelated to your post topic - what is your grow out setup? I’m getting a shipment of plants soon and am looking forward to making some cuttings once they’re established.
I just use the humidomes that you can pick up at any hydroponics store. Some nurseries carry them too. They work great and are cheap. My only complaint is that as your stuff grows, you need to be careful putting the domes back on, or you can crush overflowing vines, runners,etc. I also haven't set them up for automated misting yet, having trouble figuring out a way to do it that doesn't require fighting hoses lifting the domes, or completely removing the tray from the racks. Misting them all by hand right now which is a pain (I have 12 set up right now with another 4 in planning).
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I just use the humidomes that you can pick up at any hydroponics store. Some nurseries carry them too. They work great and are cheap. My only complaint is that as your stuff grows, you need to be careful putting the domes back on, or you can crush overflowing vines, runners,etc. I also haven't set them up for automated misting yet, having trouble figuring out a way to do it that doesn't require fighting hoses lifting the domes, or completely removing the tray from the racks. Misting them all by hand right now which is a pain (I have 12 set up right now with another 4 in planning).
Very cool! I will have to get one of those. It seems like it would fit perfectly on my bookshelf.
 

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Would love to see one like that in the wild. I know they will never fully mature in our vivariums, but still would love to see one in it's full glory.
This is my friend and his big ones. One of the problems with describing Marcgravia is the fucked up polymorphism. Thinking you’re writing a description based on one thing and the leaves look four different states isn’t easy.
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This is my friend and his big ones. One of the problems with describing Marcgravia is the fucked up polymorphism. Thinking you’re writing a description based on one thing and the leaves look four different states isn’t easy.
Impressive! I've never seen them grown like that. Mainly just see them as climbers, never as cascaders. Very cool.
 
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