Dendroboard banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,469 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I'm thinking of making a freshwater aquarium for raising mantella tadpoles. Basically it'll have water (of course), gravel, some freshwater plants, maybe a gentle HOB filter (for flow, filtration, aeration)?, and a sloped land area for froglets to climb out.

I'd also like to add some aquatic microfauna. I went on Carolina bio (don't know where else to get these things) and I'm thinking of getting Daphnia, copepods, and aquatic isopods (Asellus).

Any thoughts, comments, criticisms?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,469 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
No takers? Any thoughts as to Asellus isopods as the clean up crew?

I've been told maybe the isos might attack the tads, and that cherry shrimp might be better.

Yes? No? Maybe so?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Sadly I've no insight to offer, having no experience with aquatic microfauna, but I am very curious as to what kind of results you may get.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,691 Posts
This sounds like fun, hypostatic :)

A couple of things I can think of off the top of my head:

o Can I suggest a sponge filter like a Dirt Magnet? These have almost no water movement in any given place (unlike the intake of a HOB filter) and won't suck up any microfauna inadvertently. They can just be run with an air pump which would probably have other beneficial effects like oxygenation and further water movement.

o I like your idea of microfauna but not sure about those particular options. I am not telling you not to go with those critters - I just don't have experience with them :) Is the goal just aesthetic or did you have some function in mind for the microfauna? I really like the idea of shrimp, specifically algae-eating ones. Some of them can be bred easily in the tank (Cherry Red, Crystal Red but NOT Amano since they have a brackish larval phase). Since they eat algae and nearly microscopic food items, they won't probably be competing as much for the food you put in for the tads. I can't see any reason they would interact with the tads much, at all. Plus, they are really fun to watch and can be beautiful.

o For plants, I would just keep it simple. I have had great luck with java moss, java fern, some Cryptocorynes (wendtii is good and readily available) and annubias. Those are all low-light options. You can toss some Elodea or Hornwart in there, but I don't think it will be necessary or do especially well long term. The plants will also keep the nitrate down, which will probably be welcome for the tadpoles.

Good luck and keep us posted!

Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,469 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Did a bit more research and I think I'll go for the Asellus isos versus the cherry shrimps. Asellus gets to about 12mm, and cherry shrimp get to about 25mm. Also I've seen that shrimp get get quite voracious...

Here's a video I found on youtube:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,469 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
A couple of things I can think of off the top of my head:

o Can I suggest a sponge filter like a Dirt Magnet? These have almost no water movement in any given place (unlike the intake of a HOB filter) and won't suck up any microfauna inadvertently. They can just be run with an air pump which would probably have other beneficial effects like oxygenation and further water movement.
Yeah, I'm rethinking the filter situation. I've done a bit more research, and I think I'm going with something like this:


Amazon.com : TOM Aquarium Mini Internal Filter 45gph adjustable flow : Pet Supplies

Maybe something with an even lower flow rate. But yeah, I'd like something that agitates the surface, for more oxygenation especially. With the plants that I'm going to add, I don't think that having too high of a flow is going to be a problem, since the objects will disperse the flow. I know that tads can be totally grown in containers without flow; but I feel that for mantellas that grow up in streams especially, having stagnant water isn't the best option. I've also read anecdotal evidence from hobbyists that this is true.

o I like your idea of microfauna but not sure about those particular options. I am not telling you not to go with those critters - I just don't have experience with them :) Is the goal just aesthetic or did you have some function in mind for the microfauna? I really like the idea of shrimp, specifically algae-eating ones. Some of them can be bred easily in the tank (Cherry Red, Crystal Red but NOT Amano since they have a brackish larval phase). Since they eat algae and nearly microscopic food items, they won't probably be competing as much for the food you put in for the tads. I can't see any reason they would interact with the tads much, at all. Plus, they are really fun to watch and can be beautiful.
So the purpose of the entire setup is to be functional and servicing to the tadpoles. All of the microfauna will serve to either eat waste/algae, or as a secondary food source for the tads.

I've been thinking about it, and I think I'll also dose some microbe-lift, at least initially, to also deal with the NO3/PO4 from waste.

o For plants, I would just keep it simple. I have had great luck with java moss, java fern, some Cryptocorynes (wendtii is good and readily available) and annubias. Those are all low-light options. You can toss some Elodea or Hornwart in there, but I don't think it will be necessary or do especially well long term. The plants will also keep the nitrate down, which will probably be welcome for the tadpoles.

Good luck and keep us posted!

Mark
Yeah, definitely keeping it simple for the plants. I'm planning for low-light, cheap, and hardy options. The plants will also serve as waste sequestration, but they'll also importantly serve as hiding spots for the tads to they feel safe and less stressed, and potentially as a food source. As I mentioned above they'll also disperse the flow so that the flow isn't too strong, but there's still goof overall movement.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,691 Posts
That filter is closer to what I was thinking of. How big is the tank? That filter could be a lot for a smaller tank. If it's anything like mine, though, the sponge will start to fill up over time (even right after you clean it) so the first couple of days that it is in the tank are the most flow you will ever get. The plants will probably break up the flow quite a bit, too, as you said. I like that it looks like you can aim the outflow up toward the surface to disturb it more or less depending on what you are looking for.

Even with a low-light setup, I would not worry too much about the nitrate and phosphate situation. If you add enough plants, they will probably take care of the problem until you get your bacteria equilibrated. Just add a significant plant load right from the beginning rather than buying just a few and waiting for them to grow in.

Even though the main purpose of the tank is for grow out, if you are interested in the planted tank aspect and haven't seen it before, Diana Walstad's book, Ecology of the Planted Aquarium is an excellent reference for low-light planted tanks.

Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
I'm curious about your expierimentation with Asellus. One word of caution though, all the Asellus I have worked with needed really cool water.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top