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Is there sny specific advantage of any of the different iso species over the others? In terms of both nutrition, reproduction time, etc? I know there are several species of dwarfs, and the ever-present orange giants, so I figured I'd ask.

The same is true for springtails. They come in a multitude of species as well. Any advantages/disadvantages with any of these?

I mean, obviously the smaller frogs NEED the smaller species, but the larger frogs can handle just about all the species..

Mark
 

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I guess one disadvantage for isos is their long developmental cycle; it takes a really long time for them to reproduce when compared to STs.... but they can handle bigger loads of poop haha
 

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There is a big difference in reproduction times between isopods. I have a crazy unidentified isopod I got from Tor Linbo that outbreeds my dwarf whites 2 to 1 easily, and at lower temps too. My dwarf whtes breed faster than my dwarf grey Porcellio. Same is true for my springtails... Folsomia candida breeds much faster for me than Sinella curvisetta. However there are advantaes o the others too. Sinella curvisetta spends more time above the leaf litter, making them easier prey. Same too with the isopods. My unidentified isos may breed much faster, but they are rarely at the surface of the substrate, so they are consumed less by my frogs. VIVA VARIETY! Besides, its fun to culture bugs.
 

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Springs and isos are great because they reproduce in tank once seeded, but don't forget about bean beetles, flour beetles, pinheads, etc. I think variety is very important since different insects provide different nutrients, and any animal in the wild is going to have a larger variety of food items than we can ever provide. I feed ff's daily, and try to feed another insect weekly. I think I culture 7-8 different insects, and I know that there are people one here that culture way more than me.
 

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Two thumbs up for variety!!
My Dwarf Gray/Striped produce faster than my Dwarf Whites. My Dwarf Gray/Striped have a harder shell than the whites and they are more active, spending more time above the leaf litter.
Dwarf Whites are (arguably) the most common in the hobby and the most used as a food source. Their "laid back", almost slothful mannerisms make them easy pikkins for young froglets. The softer shell may be more digestible.
Giant Oranges are big, fast, active, and often above the leaf litter. Their huge 5/8" adult size makes them the "Mofia" of bugs as they are pretty much "Untouchable". I'm pretty sure nothing less than an adult Teribilis would consider eating them. This means they are free to go about the viv without being bothered. This gives you an adult, breeding population, in your viv. The babies will still be lunch! I think they add some value in giving a more active food for your frogs to "hunt".
Springtails
My Temperate springtails are my fastest breeders but they also tend to stay below the surface much of the time.
My Pinks are bigger and meatier. They don't breed as fast but they seem to establish in the viv easier.
My Tomocerus/Giant Blacks/silvers are absolutely huge!! The biggest of them are well over 1/8 inch and pushing 1/4"!! They are blazing fast and can jump an easy 5 or 6 inches!! They seem to be a little harder to culture but are very prolific once they get going. These guys definitely add some "thrill of the chase" to your frogs lives.
I establish all of these to every one of my vivs. Viva la variety!!
 

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Awesome reponse. you just sold yourself a couple orders .. PM SENT


Two thumbs up for variety!!
My Dwarf Gray/Striped produce faster than my Dwarf Whites. My Dwarf Gray/Striped have a harder shell than the whites and they are more active, spending more time above the leaf litter.
Dwarf Whites are (arguably) the most common in the hobby and the most used as a food source. Their "laid back", almost slothful mannerisms make them easy pikkins for young froglets. The softer shell may be more digestible.
Giant Oranges are big, fast, active, and often above the leaf litter. Their huge 5/8" adult size makes them the "Mofia" of bugs as they are pretty much "Untouchable". I'm pretty sure nothing less than an adult Teribilis would consider eating them. This means they are free to go about the viv without being bothered. This gives you an adult, breeding population, in your viv. The babies will still be lunch! I think they add some value in giving a more active food for your frogs to "hunt".
Springtails
My Temperate springtails are my fastest breeders but they also tend to stay below the surface much of the time.
My Pinks are bigger and meatier. They don't breed as fast but they seem to establish in the viv easier.
My Tomocerus/Giant Blacks/silvers are absolutely huge!! The biggest of them are well over 1/8 inch and pushing 1/4"!! They are blazing fast and can jump an easy 5 or 6 inches!! They seem to be a little harder to culture but are very prolific once they get going. These guys definitely add some "thrill of the chase" to your frogs lives.
I establish all of these to every one of my vivs. Viva la variety!!
 

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Two thumbs up for variety!!
My Dwarf Gray/Striped produce faster than my Dwarf Whites. My Dwarf Gray/Striped have a harder shell than the whites and they are more active, spending more time above the leaf litter.
Dwarf Whites are (arguably) the most common in the hobby and the most used as a food source. Their "laid back", almost slothful mannerisms make them easy pikkins for young froglets. The softer shell may be more digestible.
Giant Oranges are big, fast, active, and often above the leaf litter. Their huge 5/8" adult size makes them the "Mofia" of bugs as they are pretty much "Untouchable". I'm pretty sure nothing less than an adult Teribilis would consider eating them. This means they are free to go about the viv without being bothered. This gives you an adult, breeding population, in your viv. The babies will still be lunch! I think they add some value in giving a more active food for your frogs to "hunt".
Springtails
My Temperate springtails are my fastest breeders but they also tend to stay below the surface much of the time.
My Pinks are bigger and meatier. They don't breed as fast but they seem to establish in the viv easier.
My Tomocerus/Giant Blacks/silvers are absolutely huge!! The biggest of them are well over 1/8 inch and pushing 1/4"!! They are blazing fast and can jump an easy 5 or 6 inches!! They seem to be a little harder to culture but are very prolific once they get going. These guys definitely add some "thrill of the chase" to your frogs lives.
I establish all of these to every one of my vivs. Viva la variety!!
You're right about the dwarf greys, Doug. They do produce faster and spend most of their time above the leaf litter. Until today, I thought I somehow killed the whites. :p They were nestled towards the bottom.

Variety is indeed the spice of life. When I had my reef going, the staff in the seafood section of my local supermarket always gave a me a weird look when I only purchased small amounts of uncooked shrimp, clams, oysters, you name it. It was cheaper and the food lasted me a long time. My snake's diet varies from quail, chicks to rodents. Variety is love!

EDIT:
My future list to add to the menu:
Pink springs, orange isos, tomocerus. Culturing buggies is fun.
 

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You're right about the dwarf greys, Doug. They do produce faster and spend most of their time above the leaf litter. Until today, I thought I somehow killed the whites. :p They were nestled towards the bottom.

Variety is indeed the spice of life. When I had my reef going, the staff in the seafood section of my local supermarket always gave a me a weird look when I only purchased small amounts of uncooked shrimp, clams, oysters, you name it. It was cheaper and the food lasted me a long time. My snake's diet varies from quail, chicks to rodents. Variety is love!

EDIT:
My future list to add to the menu:
Pink springs, orange isos, tomocerus. Culturing buggies is fun.
Hey Jessica, try putting some leaf litter or a couple pieces of moist corrugated cardboard on top of the whites and they will probably move up more. Culture may be a little bit dry too, causing them to seek the lower, moister areas.
 
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