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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm considering buying a 1:1 macro lens. Would you folks recommend going with 100mm or 150mm? (The camera has a APS-C sensor and my vivarium is 18" front to back)

It seems like the 100mm is more popular - How many owners of a 100mm find yourselves wishing it was longer?

Thanks.
 

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I've got a 180mm lens, on APS-C. It's too long indoors, go with the 100mm (or 90mm Tamron or 105mm Sigma).
 

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Ive owned the Sigma 50, 105, and 180mm macro lenses. For vivrium work, id say the 105mm range is the best suited. It gives you good distance from the animals as not to spook them, and is still short enough to be practical for indoor use. The 180mm is long, but only gives you about 3-4" more distance than the 105mm, so not too bad. The only thing is, the extra distance makes it MUCH more difficult to hold still without a flash. So that's something to consider. sigma offers a good middle round with their 150mm macro, and just released a version with OS (optical stabilization) tht will allow you to shoot at speeds 4 stops slower than normal.

Mark
 

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I <3 my Sigma 150 macro

A 100mm would probably be better suited for things other than macro photography though, so it would have more utility.
 

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I think something to concider is the type of frogs you will be getting, and the size of the tank you will house them in. For me, geting enough magnification to photograph my Leucs is no problem, but trying to get a detailed shot of my thumbnails is a different story. I use the canon 100mm to photograph the frogs, and at most they are 12" from the front glass. I am very happy with the results, but sometimes I want more.
 

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Do you plan on only using this with your frogs? If so the 100mm -->160mm on Aps-c, more than enough. You might even consider a 60mm. the tokina 90mm is one of the most competitively priced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I will be using it for more than just frogs. If I go with the 100mm macro I will probably sell my 85mm that I use for pictures of my little girl.

For my non-frog needs, there are several advantages to the 100mm. But I was worried that a lot of people would find 100mm too short to reach the back of the viv. But it sounds like 100mm is usually long enough.

Thanks for the input.
 

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If I remember correctly, a 100mm Macro will only let you be about 4" from the front of the lens to the critter to get a 1:1 magnification shot. Knowing what kind of body you have would be a huge plus. If it's a canon, you'll get 1.6:1 shots at this distance; 1.5:1 with Nikon; and, of course, 1:1 with any full-frame camera.If you don't want to be inside the camera while you take shots at this magnification, I'd opt for something like the Sigma 150 or 180mm. They give you something like 11-14" of working distance respectively. I own the 180mm and it's amazing. They just came out with a 150mm with OS, which is bound to be a spectical. If you don't mind being SUPER close, and you happen to shoot canon, they make a 65mm MP-E lens which allows you to get anywhere between 1:1 and 5:1 macro with a turn of a dial. I believe this lens loses infinity focus, though, so it is quite specialized. If you're going to be using it for other critters too, including bugs, I'd go for something more than 100mm. You'll lose alot less shots due to moving front elements, lack of silent AF motors, and having to be too close. Tamron makes a 180mm Macro as well, which is supposed to be superrrr sharp, but the AF isn't great.

Mark
 
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