Dendroboard banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys this has probably already been covered in lots of other treads but if some one could point me in the right direction or give me some advice what would be great.

i am converting a 4 ft x 2 x 2 fish tank into a vivarium it also has a self supporting shelf in it so i can have 2 sperate levels within the tank

1) what type of spray foam do you use to make the back deigns i am un the UK and want to make sure i get some thing that is non toxic
2) in the backing do I need to leave holes to insert a small pot like a specimen pot for the frogs to breed in so i can easily remove them
3) any advice on the best home made soil mix
4) a list of the best type of plants would be great if possible
5) thinking of building my own mistking system by just buying one of there controllers do they run on standard 12v or 24v
6) should I leave a section on the left hand side of the tank without any substrate and have a pond like feature (if so do i need a water fall for water circulation and stop it going stagnate)

really sorry for all the question
cheers jon
298905
298906
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
The shelf is interesting.

The pond area should be left out of the plans, water features really don't give the darts any benefit and become a maintenance nightmare most of the time.

Seeing that it appears this is a reef ready tank (drilled with the overflow, I would drill a good size hole at the bottom of the overflow, that way the water can drain in and then down to a bucket or what ever you want to use. Use a false bottom where the eggcrate sits right at the top of the drilled hole so you know that you should never have wicking unless there is a major clog in the overflow or drain pipe (doubtful as you should have two holes in the bottom of that tank). Well this is what I did on mine.

As for the foam, I use Great Stuff Gaps and cracks, others also use the Pond and Stone version of Great Stuff. Either will work along with others. You can do the silicone and coco fiber to cover it, in the one I just did I use Dryloc instead, just painted it, about 5 different coats.

As for the breeding sites, what kind of darts are you looking to keep in this tank?

What will you be doing for the top? Ventilation is very important, you'll want a vent that will run the length of the tank on the front and the back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply

Not sure which Dart frogs to go for yet doing want to cover all bases just in case as I would ultimatelylike to breed them and it's easier to now than retro fitting something.

Over flow wise, I cant really drill the tank or the overflow do I am going to insert a 5 in acrylic ring into the back of the substrate where I can mount an auto topup pump and float valve system I have set In reverse, so when the water level gets to high it pumps it back out of the tank in to a storage tank below.

Ventilation wise I have 2 mesh panels which are 11 x 14 inches one on each side of the tank or I can cover these with glass and have 1 center mesh opening 8 x 11
298907
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,787 Posts
Not sure which Dart frogs to go for yet doing want to cover all bases just in case as I would ultimatelylike to breed them and it's easier to now than retro fitting something.
This would best be settled before anything else. There isn't a 'standard dart frog viv'; you can't cover all bases for all frogs, contrary to a lot of unfortunate misinformation out there.

Researching frog species first, and thoroughly, would also give suggestions as to whether such a large, and very-not-viv-ready, enclosure is a wise choice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This would best be settled before anything else. There isn't a 'standard dart frog viv'; you can't cover all bases for all frogs, contrary to a lot of unfortunate misinformation out there.

Researching frog species first, and thoroughly, would also give suggestions as to whether such a large, and very-not-viv-ready, enclosure is a wise choice.
thanks for the advice

having done some research on ventilation i understand your concerns. my intention is to install a 6inch 12 v fan on top of the tank that is wired into the the same circuit as my misting system. this way when the mister turns on it will also turns on the fan and moves the air around in the tank and push out any stale air. I would then mist regularly for small periods.

species wise I would like some thing a little rarer in the UK i.e. something that not everyone else would have so any suggestions welcomed.

cheers jon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,416 Posts
species wise I would like some thing a little rarer in the UK i.e. something that not everyone else would have so any suggestions welcomed.

cheers jon
This is such a bad idea since chances are very high you will make them even more rare with the construction you are building or have in mind.

I recommend you look at build topics here that are especialy designed for certain dart frogs. This will help you understand the basics of keeping dart frogs better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
422 Posts
I would agree with everyone here that you at least want to have the type of frog in mind when you build. A ranitomeya has different requirements than a tinc, which has different requirements than a terribilis, which has different requirements than pumilio, etc etc etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
[...] species wise I would like some thing a little rarer in the UK i.e. something that not everyone else would have so any suggestions welcomed.

cheers jon
Some species are uncommon because their care is more demanding, requires specialized knowledge, etc. So that's kind of the wrong way to start for a good experience. There are things you can only learn over time, not by reading...and that's best done with a more forgiving species.

Dendrobates leucomelas is labeled as a 'beginner' species because they're tough enough to be more forgiving of slight fluctuations in environment while a new keeper is learning the ropes, and they're generally less expensive having been in the hobby a very long time.

I've been in and out of herpetoculture for many years and kept some of the rare, high end species people drool over, and you know what? Dendrobates leucomelas -- which I keep right now -- are one of the most rewarding and fun species I've ever kept.

So try not to worry about what other people do or don't have, think about getting experience and having some fun. There are 'rare' frogs I would personally never keep because they're too shy for my taste, as another example.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
Just my two cents here, but given your tank and its ventilation issues, I would recommend placing the fan near the bottom of the tank rather than at the top.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
422 Posts
I've been in and out of herpetoculture for many years and kept some of the rare, high end species people drool over, and you know what? Dendrobates leucomelas -- which I keep right now -- are one of the most rewarding and fun species I've ever kept.

So try not to worry about what other people do or don't have, think about getting experience and having some fun. There are 'rare' frogs I would personally never keep because they're too shy for my taste, as another example.
Everything here. I've kept all kinds of different frogs that lots of people wish they got to work with, but my favorites were always my fat orange terribilis who just made shrill calls and ate their body weight in melongasters and my Costa Rican auratus.

There's always room for more frogs later once you've got the experience needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
Everything here. I've kept all kinds of different frogs that lots of people wish they got to work with, but my favorites were always my fat orange terribilis who just made shrill calls and ate their body weight in melongasters and my Costa Rican auratus.

There's always room for more frogs later once you've got the experience needed.
Yep. If I could keep only one species it'd be the Mighty Terribilis.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Over flow wise, I cant really drill the tank or the overflow do I am going to insert a 5 in acrylic ring into the back of the substrate where I can mount an auto topup pump and float valve system I have set In reverse, so when the water level gets to high it pumps it back out of the tank in to a storage tank below.
Having an overflow in the tank the entire height of the tank made me assume that the bottom of the tank is already drilled, in the photo I do see plumbing in it, so I was talking about drilling the plastic overflow and utilize the existing holes in the bottom of the with bulkheads for your drain.

I would also recommend Leucs.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,899 Posts
The shelf with its generous opening cut out, could be a dimensional positive for the frogs if the water plan was deleted and re blue printed in terra.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for all the replies guys sorry for the delay in coming back my notification didn't come through.

Please dont think i am entering in to this lightly as I am not. I have keep and breed diffcult thing before.

When I said rare species i did not mean from day one. But would like the option to swap over later without having to change what's need to breed.

I will look into terribilis

Unfortunately I can't drill the overflow it has a second glass wall
Cheers jon
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,899 Posts
I see a Level, with a generously sized opening to it. Which I see as a dimensional Plus of frog environment and activity use.

Large bodies of water never work out per longevity of non semi aquatic species. The rapid recoloninization rate of potentially harmful fauna and fungi will always, eventually, have its way. A cut, an interim of lowered animal flourish, a chill, a biological decomp event. It will occur.

I have never known a longevity notation of terrestrial anurans in these and I am including inside staff privy of the zoos in my location.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,899 Posts
"Near Water" in native circumstances doesnt compute to miniaturized water falls and tiny doll sized lakes and streams.

A clean puddle is ok though. And recognized by the subject.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,899 Posts
As a Pos that shelf looks excellent as a base for creating interesting habitat detail to your vivarium sans the water.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,899 Posts
People are attracted to moving water. This has been happening since the first fountain in ancient Greece.

Its happening now in glass cubes with colorful little anurans. Foggers are popular because of swirly novelty fortified by high arial photography of cloud forests.

On scale. Look down. Look out of what you like to see.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top