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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just finished planting my 36x18x18 tank and after posting a photo of it on this forum and getting some feedback I am now trying to add more climbing space. I am thinking of getting three leucs. Here is what the tank currently looks like. I do have three cork bark tubes attached to the background and ramps going up to them. I outlined this in red because it is hard to make out. I was thinking of either doing one of those magnetic reptile ledges on the right side glass and using cork bark to make another ramp or perhaps gorilla gluing some cork bark to the glass (although now that it is planted and the CUC is in I am not sure if the glue fumes could harm them..). Do dart frogs typically like to climb on some of the things marketed for Crested Geckos? I would love to hear any other ideas. Thanks!
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You have some of the right ideas already built in (for example that manzanita branch and cork tube). Key is just to fill up more of that empty background space if you want to use it with more branches (including some that partially go into the "middle" and along the sides of the viv).

I actually build most of my vivs using removable branches / wood in case I need to go hunt down a frog / new juveniles I missed during breeding season. All the functionality of a breeder layout while still looking like a viewing / presentation tank.

For example this tank (for some Ranitomeya - ignore the old textbooks, just a placeholder for the substrate). All the branches are fully removable / added after the background / siliconing is done and there is lots of climbing space without taking up any floor space. Have a proper build log of this one here: New Build Thread - Custom Acrylic Viv

Key is to find branches that are Y-shaped or "curvy" and then either have them slanted down ward (like the one running from top left to right, a bit like a root) or the one that is stood up on the left and running up / to the right (a bit like a tree). Easy to lean those into your tank against a wall / background and "plant" them into your substrate. I've found that alone to be very sturdy, especially when "interlacing" the branches and using corners / natural nooks in your background as supports (for example your cork tube). Important is to use sturdy hard wood (ghostwood, manzanita, non-salty mangrove). These branches are the ghostwood branches from NE Herp.

If you're worried about stability, a few bamboo skewers into the background (or even a rooting plant / bromeliad) will firmly secure them.

You could easily add branches like this to the corners / middle of your viv and get the desired effect. Mount a few plants to them and you're in business.


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Same tank after planting:

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And here it is grown in:

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Same concept with another tank:
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you @eMCRay, that is really helpful. I was unsure if they could climb on the skinnier branches of spider wood (vs something flatter like cork). I will encorporate more spider wood.
 

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Thank you @eMCRay, that is really helpful. I was unsure if they could climb on the skinnier branches of spider wood (vs something flatter like cork). I will encorporate more spider wood.
Oh yeah these guys can even climb straight up glass. Branches are no problem for them... they also go straight up that cork background.

Anything that's as wide as their body will do, but add wider "resting" spots (plants, wider branches, moss, etc.) as well to encourage them to move up around there. Spider wood - make sure its not the grape wood since that doesn't do well in high humidity / wet environments. Ironwood or ghostwood or manzanita are best.
 

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You can also adhere (w/ silicone) some cork pieces on the end panes. Ledges, stair-steps, whatever. Play around with the dimensions. A table saw is a great tool for making a continuous flat edge on bigger pieces, which helps with adhesion. But you certainly don't need to use a table saw. A little oscillating multi-tool also works fine.

A nice wider "resting spot" as described above can be achieved with a partial (1/3 to 1/2 or just a little more) round, filled with substrate and maybe a small plant with a little room to sit underneath its leaves.

You can also do a cracked-cork mosaic, just put way less moss than normal in so you've got nice ledges on all your cork pieces. The moss in the back will help keep up the humidity, if you spray it regularly. (If you don't it tends to dry out and then it'll stay dry.)

Good luck!
 

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Manzanita branches are a core part of my work in progress build. I do have smaller frogs though, where I know my little guys will be all over this. I’m training some of my vining plants to hang off of these and attaching broms and till I Sandia on the upper branches for more coverage. Not my most recent photo, but for reference:
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perhaps gorilla gluing some cork bark to the glass (although now that it is planted and the CUC is in I am not sure if the glue fumes could harm them..).
I thought I killed my CUC with the fumes of the silicon, in this topic: Did I kill my CUC? the reactions if the fumes could kill were mixed.
I think you would be fine with some aquarium safe superglue, but I don't know how strong the bond between the cork bark and the glass will be then.
Silicon will defenitly work, but that would be risky.
 

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I think you would be fine with some aquarium safe superglue, but I don't know how strong the bond between the cork bark and the glass will be then.
Silicon will defenitly work, but that would be risky.
The very best thing to securely, "permanently" adhere most materials to glass, is silicone. If you are just adhering a few branch ends, and/or a few relatively small pieces of cork bark to the glass, then the volume of silicone required will be pretty minimal. A small fraction (10% or less) of a 10-oz tube.This acetic acid production will also be minimal.
  • If you have CUC-killing concerns then simply provide adequate ventilation, and also try to get the cure finished quickly and completely by providing enough ambient humidity.
  • If you have a cool-mist humidifier or a fogger you can provide both at the same time - just open up the viv and point the moisture into it.
Good luck!
 

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Yep - I wouldn't recommend superglue on glass as much. Small dabs of silicone if you want to glue, just ventilate. I've done it lots of times and no issues with CUC or darts (but be careful / avoid doing this if they are breeding - eggs / tads / froglets are more sensitive).

You could even use the silicone to create a "nook" or "ledge" that you can rest the wood against if you want to modify / adjust or remove it for maintenance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks everyone. I am going to pick up a few more various size and shape wood pieces and arrange them throughout. I think I should be able to wedge things in and won't have to worry about using magnets or glue or sillicon. I will post an updates photo when done.
 
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